Public History at American University

AU's Public History program prepares students to collaborate with communities and institutions to document and interpret the past.

American University's Public History program prepares students to practice history in public, collaborating with communities and cultural institutions to document and interpret both local and national histories. A degree in public history opens doors to a number of professional fields, including museums, cultural tourism and community history, historic preservation and cultural resource management, libraries and archives, and new media.

Operating as usual

05/05/2024

Frederick Douglass stopped by to check out the Humanities Truck this afternoon at the Anacostia River Festival.

04/12/2024

Please join us in celebrating the accomplishments of our graduating MA Public History students. We will feature the incredible work our first year cohort students have done in collaboration with the National Park Service, highlighting the role of Punk, GoGo, and African Drumming in the parks.

We will gather on April 25th from 3:30 - 5:00 pm in the Battelle- Tompkins Atrium.

Sherrell says, "As a public historian, my professional goal is to make museums more accessible to everyone while also highlighting the importance of diverse perspectives in historical narratives. I aim to challenge traditional ideas of what history is and who it belongs to, giving voice to those who have been excluded from the historical record. Ultimately, I hope to inspire visitors to engage critically with the past and to consider its relevance to contemporary issues. During my time at AU, I explored different roles within the museum, which has allowed me to gain a deeper understanding of the curatorial process and develop skills in areas such as exhibition evaluation, oral history, digital archiving, and public programming. While at AU, I created summative evaluations for the Girlhood (It's Complicated) exhibition as part of a practicum project, which gave me the opportunity to acquire valuable experience in audience evaluation. I also had the opportunity to intern as a curator in the Work and Industry division at the National Museum of American History, where I acquired valuable skills in curatorial work, and collections management. As a graduate fellow at the Humanities Truck, I was able to gain skills in oral history, digital archiving, and public programming. This experience has allowed me to work directly with communities to capture and preserve their stories, making their voices heard through historical record. Overall, my experiences at AU have allowed me to further my goals. I am grateful for everything I have learned and experienced during your time here."

Congrats Sherrell! We're so proud of you! 04/26/2023

Sherrell says, "As a public historian, my professional goal is to make museums more accessible to everyone while also highlighting the importance of diverse perspectives in historical narratives. I aim to challenge traditional ideas of what history is and who it belongs to, giving voice to those who have been excluded from the historical record. Ultimately, I hope to inspire visitors to engage critically with the past and to consider its relevance to contemporary issues. During my time at AU, I explored different roles within the museum, which has allowed me to gain a deeper understanding of the curatorial process and develop skills in areas such as exhibition evaluation, oral history, digital archiving, and public programming. While at AU, I created summative evaluations for the Girlhood (It's Complicated) exhibition as part of a practicum project, which gave me the opportunity to acquire valuable experience in audience evaluation. I also had the opportunity to intern as a curator in the Work and Industry division at the National Museum of American History, where I acquired valuable skills in curatorial work, and collections management. As a graduate fellow at the Humanities Truck, I was able to gain skills in oral history, digital archiving, and public programming. This experience has allowed me to work directly with communities to capture and preserve their stories, making their voices heard through historical record. Overall, my experiences at AU have allowed me to further my goals. I am grateful for everything I have learned and experienced during your time here." Congrats Sherrell! We're so proud of you!

Molly says, "Like many of my classmates, I came to American University after time away from the academic realm, after a pandemic that rocked what we knew to be true in the world, and after our country seemed to slide further into a cultural and social decline. I came to American University with a lot of hope for how public history might be able to remedy some of these big questions we have about how to be informed and knowledgeable citizens of the world. I still don’t know the answers to the biggest questions, but my time at American has taught me so much about the role public history has to play in shaping our future. 

The past two years have sharpened my abilities to do history well, and to do justice to the stories I would like to tell. My position as a research assistant for Dr. Pamela Nadell has allowed me to witness an expert in her field at work, helping me understand the way a professional historian thinks about her topics. My classes have been eye-opening in many ways and I want to whole-heartedly thank all of the professors that I had the opportunity to work with. I have learned to question silences, to notate absences, and to center stories that I would not have thought to center a few years ago. My work with Moment Magazine and the American Institute of Physics has given me the space to practice aspects of public history, through oral histories, collections, and writing and editing for the public. 

What comes next for me remains to be seen, but I hope to bring everything I have learned through this program into all of my future endeavors, whether that’s in a museum, in an athletic department, in a publishing house, or in a classroom."

Congrats Molly! We're so excited to see what you do next! 04/24/2023

Molly says, "Like many of my classmates, I came to American University after time away from the academic realm, after a pandemic that rocked what we knew to be true in the world, and after our country seemed to slide further into a cultural and social decline. I came to American University with a lot of hope for how public history might be able to remedy some of these big questions we have about how to be informed and knowledgeable citizens of the world. I still don’t know the answers to the biggest questions, but my time at American has taught me so much about the role public history has to play in shaping our future. The past two years have sharpened my abilities to do history well, and to do justice to the stories I would like to tell. My position as a research assistant for Dr. Pamela Nadell has allowed me to witness an expert in her field at work, helping me understand the way a professional historian thinks about her topics. My classes have been eye-opening in many ways and I want to whole-heartedly thank all of the professors that I had the opportunity to work with. I have learned to question silences, to notate absences, and to center stories that I would not have thought to center a few years ago. My work with Moment Magazine and the American Institute of Physics has given me the space to practice aspects of public history, through oral histories, collections, and writing and editing for the public. What comes next for me remains to be seen, but I hope to bring everything I have learned through this program into all of my future endeavors, whether that’s in a museum, in an athletic department, in a publishing house, or in a classroom." Congrats Molly! We're so excited to see what you do next!

"During my time at AU, I have been encouraged to find new and unique ways to engage the public. By listening to the people I serve as a Public Historian, I am able to craft better ideas that bring history to anyone ready to learn.

For over a year, I have worked at Museum of the Bible in Washington, DC, developing, guiding, and implementing Public Programs. While many museum educators focus on school learning, there is an entire demographic of adult lifelong learners who influence children. By creating contextual experiences that encourage dialogue, I gain more and more experience on what museum education looks like. 

Not only do I have the privilege to work with adults, but I am learning new ways to bring history alive for the next generation. Through inquiry-based curiosity-driven methodologies, I have worked to create accessible lesson plans for teachers that engage primary sources in the classroom. To know that the future generations of learners can grow in classrooms where collections are within their grasp is wonderful. To play a part in presenting those collections and encouraging critical thinking drives me to be a better public historian and museum educator.

I look forward to continuing my study of the past. I anticipate even more the opportunity to daily engage those I come in contact with with the stories that have led us here. To the present. To know history is to understand our culture. Our world. Our impact. Our identities. Non-traditional learning is so important. And I look forward to seeing where this path will continue to lead and who I have yet to meet." 

Congrats Michaela! We're so excited to see your continuing success! 04/24/2023

"During my time at AU, I have been encouraged to find new and unique ways to engage the public. By listening to the people I serve as a Public Historian, I am able to craft better ideas that bring history to anyone ready to learn. For over a year, I have worked at Museum of the Bible in Washington, DC, developing, guiding, and implementing Public Programs. While many museum educators focus on school learning, there is an entire demographic of adult lifelong learners who influence children. By creating contextual experiences that encourage dialogue, I gain more and more experience on what museum education looks like. Not only do I have the privilege to work with adults, but I am learning new ways to bring history alive for the next generation. Through inquiry-based curiosity-driven methodologies, I have worked to create accessible lesson plans for teachers that engage primary sources in the classroom. To know that the future generations of learners can grow in classrooms where collections are within their grasp is wonderful. To play a part in presenting those collections and encouraging critical thinking drives me to be a better public historian and museum educator. I look forward to continuing my study of the past. I anticipate even more the opportunity to daily engage those I come in contact with with the stories that have led us here. To the present. To know history is to understand our culture. Our world. Our impact. Our identities. Non-traditional learning is so important. And I look forward to seeing where this path will continue to lead and who I have yet to meet." Congrats Michaela! We're so excited to see your continuing success!

"I have enjoyed and learned so much during my time at American University! I chose AU’s Public History program as it afforded me the opportunity to learn new skills that will aid me in my future career. For instance, I had the opportunity to conduct my own oral history interviews and gain hands-on digital humanities skills in classes.
One of the most exciting aspects about AU is its location in Washington, D.C., since it is home to numerous museums and archives. For my internship and classes, I researched at the National Archives and the Library of Congress. It was a surreal experience combing through numerous documents in those famous archives. Being in D.C. also allowed me to become the History & Cultural Resources Intern at the Department of Homeland Security (DHS). I was tasked with researching and uncovering stories of St. Elizabeths Hospital, the current headquarters of the department, for a walking tour of the campus that will be shared with DHS employees and visitors. 
One of the reasons I wanted to become a public historian was to research and share with people stories that have hardly been researched in the past. At AU, I had the opportunity to do just that in Graduate Research Seminar. My first topic pertained to St. Elizabeths Hospital during World War II. I was curious about detailing how this federally owned hospital dealt with wartime demands on the home front. My second research paper pertained to Woodlawn Cemetery in D.C., which is a historically African American cemetery. During my research, I became interested in telling the story of community advocacy from the 1930s to the present to save the cemetery from closing and succumbing to commercial development as other African American cemeteries unfortunately had.
While I can hardly believe my time at AU is almost complete, I am excited for my next chapter: starting as a Genealogist at the National Society Daughters of the American Revolution in June!"

Congrats Meredith! We're so proud of all your work! 04/24/2023

"I have enjoyed and learned so much during my time at American University! I chose AU’s Public History program as it afforded me the opportunity to learn new skills that will aid me in my future career. For instance, I had the opportunity to conduct my own oral history interviews and gain hands-on digital humanities skills in classes. One of the most exciting aspects about AU is its location in Washington, D.C., since it is home to numerous museums and archives. For my internship and classes, I researched at the National Archives and the Library of Congress. It was a surreal experience combing through numerous documents in those famous archives. Being in D.C. also allowed me to become the History & Cultural Resources Intern at the Department of Homeland Security (DHS). I was tasked with researching and uncovering stories of St. Elizabeths Hospital, the current headquarters of the department, for a walking tour of the campus that will be shared with DHS employees and visitors. One of the reasons I wanted to become a public historian was to research and share with people stories that have hardly been researched in the past. At AU, I had the opportunity to do just that in Graduate Research Seminar. My first topic pertained to St. Elizabeths Hospital during World War II. I was curious about detailing how this federally owned hospital dealt with wartime demands on the home front. My second research paper pertained to Woodlawn Cemetery in D.C., which is a historically African American cemetery. During my research, I became interested in telling the story of community advocacy from the 1930s to the present to save the cemetery from closing and succumbing to commercial development as other African American cemeteries unfortunately had. While I can hardly believe my time at AU is almost complete, I am excited for my next chapter: starting as a Genealogist at the National Society Daughters of the American Revolution in June!" Congrats Meredith! We're so proud of all your work!

Mckenna says, "The Public History Program at American University has taught me more than I ever could have imagined about my field, but also given me the most amazing opportunities to grow professionally. Throughout my time in the program I worked as a full-time history teacher in Fairfax County Public Schools teaching middle school history and civics. When I grow up, I want to be the director of education in a museum or historic site so being able to take when I was learning in my classes back to my classroom was amazing. Not only was I learning first hand how to implement public history practice into my classroom, but I was engaging students with the learning as well. I valued the flexibility I was able to have at AU so I could pursue my master’s while also working and doing something I loved. 

The program also helped me to create amazing connections that helped me to receive my internship with the National Park Service. The internship I received for the program shaped the rest of my graduate career, expanded my historical focus, and has led me to amazing opportunities like being part of a NCPH working group on the subject. Had it not been for this program and the opportunities I received during it, I would not have found my historic niche or opportunities to work with it. 

I graduated in December of 2022 and have recently accepted and started a position at Ball State University as the University Youth Camp Coordinator for the Indiana Youth Programs on Campus where I will be managing a grant from the Eli Lilly Foundation and creating and implementing programming for the camps. This connects a lot of my passions including education, summer camps, and public history by being able to give quality programming to youth in my area for free."

Congrats McKenna! We're so proud of your new positions at BSU! 04/24/2023

Mckenna says, "The Public History Program at American University has taught me more than I ever could have imagined about my field, but also given me the most amazing opportunities to grow professionally. Throughout my time in the program I worked as a full-time history teacher in Fairfax County Public Schools teaching middle school history and civics. When I grow up, I want to be the director of education in a museum or historic site so being able to take when I was learning in my classes back to my classroom was amazing. Not only was I learning first hand how to implement public history practice into my classroom, but I was engaging students with the learning as well. I valued the flexibility I was able to have at AU so I could pursue my master’s while also working and doing something I loved. The program also helped me to create amazing connections that helped me to receive my internship with the National Park Service. The internship I received for the program shaped the rest of my graduate career, expanded my historical focus, and has led me to amazing opportunities like being part of a NCPH working group on the subject. Had it not been for this program and the opportunities I received during it, I would not have found my historic niche or opportunities to work with it. I graduated in December of 2022 and have recently accepted and started a position at Ball State University as the University Youth Camp Coordinator for the Indiana Youth Programs on Campus where I will be managing a grant from the Eli Lilly Foundation and creating and implementing programming for the camps. This connects a lot of my passions including education, summer camps, and public history by being able to give quality programming to youth in my area for free." Congrats McKenna! We're so proud of your new positions at BSU!

Madeline says, "The past two years at AU have allowed me the incredible opportunity to both grow my own passion for history and to learn how to help others engage with the history that excites them. As a public historian, I believe that every person has a history that they are passionate about, whether that be the history of their community, the story of a favorite local building, or that one historical event that they learned about in high school and have been obsessed with ever since. For me, Public History is about creating avenues for the public to explore the history that excites them, to discover new perspectives, and to tell their own stories. 

I stumbled across AU Public History by accident my senior year of college, but within moments of learning what Public History was I knew that was what I wanted to study. I have always been interested in learning about what history means to people and how they react and respond to it, so AU Public History was the perfect fit. AU Public History has helped me hone my skills as a researcher, historian, and storyteller (It also allowed me to explore some pretty niche research interests). Through AU, I discovered that my passions for public history line in interpretation, inclusivity, and engagement. Nothing gets me more excited than nailing down the perfect museum label in 80 words, elevating narratives that have been left out of historic sites, or working with community partners to find ways to tell the stories that are relevant to them. 

I am incredibly grateful for the skills and connections that I have fostered at AU. I am excited to be part of this fantastic class of emerging public historians."

Congrats Maddie! We're so excited to see your future work! 04/24/2023

Madeline says, "The past two years at AU have allowed me the incredible opportunity to both grow my own passion for history and to learn how to help others engage with the history that excites them. As a public historian, I believe that every person has a history that they are passionate about, whether that be the history of their community, the story of a favorite local building, or that one historical event that they learned about in high school and have been obsessed with ever since. For me, Public History is about creating avenues for the public to explore the history that excites them, to discover new perspectives, and to tell their own stories. I stumbled across AU Public History by accident my senior year of college, but within moments of learning what Public History was I knew that was what I wanted to study. I have always been interested in learning about what history means to people and how they react and respond to it, so AU Public History was the perfect fit. AU Public History has helped me hone my skills as a researcher, historian, and storyteller (It also allowed me to explore some pretty niche research interests). Through AU, I discovered that my passions for public history line in interpretation, inclusivity, and engagement. Nothing gets me more excited than nailing down the perfect museum label in 80 words, elevating narratives that have been left out of historic sites, or working with community partners to find ways to tell the stories that are relevant to them. I am incredibly grateful for the skills and connections that I have fostered at AU. I am excited to be part of this fantastic class of emerging public historians." Congrats Maddie! We're so excited to see your future work!

"My name is Lauryn Baehr and through my time at American University I have learned that objects are essential to making history real to an audience and can illustrate history in a tangible and visual way that text cannot. By studying objects which were important to people in the past, we are able to understand more about other generations and what they valued and how that has changed over time. Through collections management work, I strive to ensure the preservation of items for future generations. As I believe that the basis of museums are the items; the preservation of their historic integrity is essential. I do public history by preserving collections items and interpreting their stories for public audiences. 
I have done two internships during my time at American University. The first was a collections management internship in the Graphic Arts and Printing Collection at the National Museum of American History for which I worked to organize a collection of 68,000 artifacts. My second internship, also at NMAH, is working to digitize over 6,000 catalog cards and to prepare a 5 million dollar exhibit for transport. In addition to these projects I have also spent time learning to make artifact mounts and to do basic object conservation. A majority of my projects I have done at American University and NMAH have centered around material culture. These projects have included interpreting Huguenot material culture, writing exhibit labels for a collection of Chinese American costumes, and writing a blog for NMAH interpreting a American Revolution woodblock. My time at American University has helped me discover my passion for collections work and material culture. "

Congrats Lauryn! We're so proud of you! 04/24/2023

"My name is Lauryn Baehr and through my time at American University I have learned that objects are essential to making history real to an audience and can illustrate history in a tangible and visual way that text cannot. By studying objects which were important to people in the past, we are able to understand more about other generations and what they valued and how that has changed over time. Through collections management work, I strive to ensure the preservation of items for future generations. As I believe that the basis of museums are the items; the preservation of their historic integrity is essential. I do public history by preserving collections items and interpreting their stories for public audiences. I have done two internships during my time at American University. The first was a collections management internship in the Graphic Arts and Printing Collection at the National Museum of American History for which I worked to organize a collection of 68,000 artifacts. My second internship, also at NMAH, is working to digitize over 6,000 catalog cards and to prepare a 5 million dollar exhibit for transport. In addition to these projects I have also spent time learning to make artifact mounts and to do basic object conservation. A majority of my projects I have done at American University and NMAH have centered around material culture. These projects have included interpreting Huguenot material culture, writing exhibit labels for a collection of Chinese American costumes, and writing a blog for NMAH interpreting a American Revolution woodblock. My time at American University has helped me discover my passion for collections work and material culture. " Congrats Lauryn! We're so proud of you!

Joshua says,"Throughout my development as a public historian, storytelling has been at the heart of my work. American University’s Public History program has allowed me to interpret a wide variety of topics into accessible interpretive content. Over the last two years I have been American University’s Public History Graduate Fellow in the History of Slavery and Its Legacies in Washington, D.C. During the first year of the fellowship, I created social media posts and published two articles for the White House Historical Association on a variety of topics surrounding White House history from civil rights to Hawaii’s statehood. The second year of my fellowship has been with American University’s Antiracist Research and Policy Center, where I have been designing a StoryMap to visualize American University’s relationship with slavery within the greater context of DC’s history with slavery. 

American University’s Public History program has provided me a platform to develop as a storyteller interpreting academic research methodologies into publicly accessible content. This foundation put me into a position to intern with the Museum Team at National Geographic Society where I witnessed the power behind connecting with public audiences through diverse storytelling. Whether it is highlighting histories that have been forgotten and silenced with stakeholders or analyzing the things we see around us, storytelling is at the heart of public history work. I hope to establish myself as a diverse storyteller that allows everyone to feel heard, valued, and included."

Congrats Josh! We're so excited to see your continuing work! 04/22/2023

Joshua says,"Throughout my development as a public historian, storytelling has been at the heart of my work. American University’s Public History program has allowed me to interpret a wide variety of topics into accessible interpretive content. Over the last two years I have been American University’s Public History Graduate Fellow in the History of Slavery and Its Legacies in Washington, D.C. During the first year of the fellowship, I created social media posts and published two articles for the White House Historical Association on a variety of topics surrounding White House history from civil rights to Hawaii’s statehood. The second year of my fellowship has been with American University’s Antiracist Research and Policy Center, where I have been designing a StoryMap to visualize American University’s relationship with slavery within the greater context of DC’s history with slavery. American University’s Public History program has provided me a platform to develop as a storyteller interpreting academic research methodologies into publicly accessible content. This foundation put me into a position to intern with the Museum Team at National Geographic Society where I witnessed the power behind connecting with public audiences through diverse storytelling. Whether it is highlighting histories that have been forgotten and silenced with stakeholders or analyzing the things we see around us, storytelling is at the heart of public history work. I hope to establish myself as a diverse storyteller that allows everyone to feel heard, valued, and included." Congrats Josh! We're so excited to see your continuing work!

Jane talks abut her time with the program as,"From an early age, I knew history was where I wanted to be in the future. But I had no idea where I would go in that field. American University’s Public History Program became a way for me to play with ideas and test my skills and gain new experiences. I found that the telling of stories through objects and visuals was where my passion lay.
Through my time here, I had three key internships that influenced me, and I got to research so many topics. I was a communication intern at the American Battlefield Trust, and it inspired my public-facing writing skills. I was an intern for the Fine Art and Collections Management Departments at the State Museum of Pennsylvania, and I lived and breathed the museum world behind the scenes. I was an intern at Chevy Chase Historical Society, and I fell in love with the power of local history. My research has led me to creating an archive for abandoned locations around Washington, D.C. in an attempt to preserve their lost history in the digital world. Also, I explored disaster history in order to emphasize its importance in the present as lessons and as underrepresented social and environmental history.
Through institutions and organizations, it is incredibly important how the public engages with history. The past is incredibly complicated, but the connection the public forms with history is beyond powerful. Whether managing a collection, giving a tour, creating exhibits, or reaching out to the public in social media, we work to make those connections and ensure we do not lose our past—your past. "

Congrats Jane! We're so excited to see your next adventures! 04/21/2023

Jane talks abut her time with the program as,"From an early age, I knew history was where I wanted to be in the future. But I had no idea where I would go in that field. American University’s Public History Program became a way for me to play with ideas and test my skills and gain new experiences. I found that the telling of stories through objects and visuals was where my passion lay. Through my time here, I had three key internships that influenced me, and I got to research so many topics. I was a communication intern at the American Battlefield Trust, and it inspired my public-facing writing skills. I was an intern for the Fine Art and Collections Management Departments at the State Museum of Pennsylvania, and I lived and breathed the museum world behind the scenes. I was an intern at Chevy Chase Historical Society, and I fell in love with the power of local history. My research has led me to creating an archive for abandoned locations around Washington, D.C. in an attempt to preserve their lost history in the digital world. Also, I explored disaster history in order to emphasize its importance in the present as lessons and as underrepresented social and environmental history. Through institutions and organizations, it is incredibly important how the public engages with history. The past is incredibly complicated, but the connection the public forms with history is beyond powerful. Whether managing a collection, giving a tour, creating exhibits, or reaching out to the public in social media, we work to make those connections and ensure we do not lose our past—your past. " Congrats Jane! We're so excited to see your next adventures!

"My time at American University has been greatly impactful for my development as an emerging public historian. Before, I wasn’t even aware of public history as a field, and now I see this as the perfect place for me to use all of the random assortment of skills and interests I have acquired over my life, from history to creative writing to geology. As a generalist, I have found that the perspective I have has been incredibly useful for integrating absolutely anything into my research and projects, which is greatly attractive for the general public’s limited attention. There’s a lot out there in the world that keeps people’s eyes away from knowing why they should care about the people and the places around them, and any way that we as public historians can keep the public inspired to enact change and rectify wrongs is a way worth pursuing.

I got into history after having been enamored by the stories of the past all my life, and I’ve been fortunate enough to have ample support from friends and family to get me to where I am now. History is the greatest story ever told, and one that will continue long past any of our times in the spotlight. The chapters that we are in and even the chapters that we write are just one small part of this great tapestry that we all constantly weave, a tapestry that we will never truly see yet cannot help but feel proud of what we are weaving. What we do is we give those who will come after us a chance of knowing those who came before like the friends they would have been. It is a noble task, and like all such things it is full of love and heartbreak, of secrecy and discovery, of loss and fulfillment. And in this way, we understand who it is we are destined to be, no matter how terrifying or uplifting."

Great Job Evan! We're so proud of you and your work with the department! 04/20/2023

"My time at American University has been greatly impactful for my development as an emerging public historian. Before, I wasn’t even aware of public history as a field, and now I see this as the perfect place for me to use all of the random assortment of skills and interests I have acquired over my life, from history to creative writing to geology. As a generalist, I have found that the perspective I have has been incredibly useful for integrating absolutely anything into my research and projects, which is greatly attractive for the general public’s limited attention. There’s a lot out there in the world that keeps people’s eyes away from knowing why they should care about the people and the places around them, and any way that we as public historians can keep the public inspired to enact change and rectify wrongs is a way worth pursuing. I got into history after having been enamored by the stories of the past all my life, and I’ve been fortunate enough to have ample support from friends and family to get me to where I am now. History is the greatest story ever told, and one that will continue long past any of our times in the spotlight. The chapters that we are in and even the chapters that we write are just one small part of this great tapestry that we all constantly weave, a tapestry that we will never truly see yet cannot help but feel proud of what we are weaving. What we do is we give those who will come after us a chance of knowing those who came before like the friends they would have been. It is a noble task, and like all such things it is full of love and heartbreak, of secrecy and discovery, of loss and fulfillment. And in this way, we understand who it is we are destined to be, no matter how terrifying or uplifting." Great Job Evan! We're so proud of you and your work with the department!

Want your school to be the top-listed School/college in Washington D.C.?

Click here to claim your Sponsored Listing.

Videos (show all)

Location

Telephone

Address


4400 Massachusetts Avenue NW
Washington D.C., DC
20016
Other Colleges & Universities in Washington D.C. (show all)
Corcoran School of the Arts and Design at the George Washington University Corcoran School of the Arts and Design at the George Washington University
500 17th Street NW
Washington D.C., 20006

Visit us virtually! See events, talks and performances online at go.gwu.edu/atcorcoran.

UBIS University of Business Innovation and Sustainability UBIS University of Business Innovation and Sustainability
1401 H Street NW Suite 100
Washington D.C., 20005

One of the BEST Swiss private Business University which proposes BBA, MBA and DBA program online and

Georgetown University Georgetown University
3700 O Street NW
Washington D.C., 20057

Georgetown University is the oldest and largest Catholic and Jesuit university in America.

The Graduate School of Political Management The Graduate School of Political Management
805 21st Street NW
Washington D.C., 20052

www.gspm.gwu.edu; www.twitter.com/gspmgwu; http://politicalmanagementmasters.online.gwu.edu/; http://publicrelationsmasters.online.gwu.edu/

Georgetown Club of Metropolitan Washington, D.C. Georgetown Club of Metropolitan Washington, D.C.
P. O. Box 18126
Washington D.C., 20036

The Georgetown Club of Metro DC is the flagship club of the Georgetown University Alumni Association.

Georgetown University Jewish Life Georgetown University Jewish Life
Georgetown University
Washington D.C., 20057

Georgetown Jewish Life --Because there is more way than one way to be GUish!

Semester in Washington Semester in Washington
Washington D.C.

A hands-on academic program for college students interested in politics. Take classes on applied pol

American University School of Professional & Extended Studies American University School of Professional & Extended Studies
4400 Massachusetts Avenue NW
Washington D.C., 20016

The School of Professional & Extended Studies/SPExS

American University Career Center American University Career Center
4400 Massachusetts Avenue NW/5th Floor Butler Pavilion
Washington D.C., 20016

The AU Career Center teaches students and alumni to develop career goals, decision-making skills, and job search strategies to manage their professional and academic pursuits.

Georgetown Alumni Georgetown Alumni
3604 O Street NW
Washington D.C., 20007

Georgetown Alumni on Facebook is your first stop in reconnecting with your alma mater and classmates on Facebook.

University of the Potomac University of the Potomac
1401 H Street NW, Ste 100
Washington D.C., 20005

University of the Potomac offers Associate, Bachelor, and Master degree programs that are in high dem

Howard University Department of Music Howard University Department of Music
2455 6th Street NW
Washington D.C., 20059