Office of Archaeological Research

Archaeology and Historic Preservation in Alabama & Southeast The University of Alabama's Office of Archaeological Research (OAR) has over 38 years of experience providing archaeological and historic research and cultural resources management services to multiple federal, Native American tribe, state, and local governmental agencies as well as private and commercial clients.

Operating as usual

06/15/2021

SAVE THE DATES! πŸ“’ This year's Moundville Native American Festival will be held in-person and at the park from October 6-9! For more information about school groups, becoming a vendor, or how to volunteer, visit our website. πŸ”— https://bit.ly/3wh5OZP

05/26/2021

πŸ“’ : This year, Museum Expedition 43 will have three two-day programs throughout June and July, focusing on artifact cleaning and processing with the Office of Archaeological Research!

For more information, visit: πŸ”— https://bit.ly/3wrXHJM

04/14/2021

TONIGHT at 7 PM: UA Museums Student Members are invited to hang out over Zoom and play Jeopardy with us! We can't promise that the clues will be easy, but Final Jeopardy is sure to be dramatic! 🀯 Check your email for the link.

#UAMuseums #RollTide #TodayAtUA #Tuscaloosa #RTR

04/07/2021

TODAY at 11 AM: πŸ‘‰ UA Museums Student Members are invited to brew some coffee, tea, or your β˜• hot beverage of choice and join us for a Virtual Coffee Hour! Check your πŸ“§ email for the Zoom link.

#UAMuseums #RollTide #TideTogether #RTR #Museum #Tuscaloosa

04/06/2021

TOMORROW at 11 AM: πŸ‘‰ Hey, UA Museums Student Members! Come hang out with us for a Virtual Coffee Hour via Zoom. β˜•

To become a Student Member, fill out this online form: πŸ”— https://buff.ly/32eflV9

#UAMuseums #RollTide #TideTogether #RTR #Museum #Tuscaloosa

Bama Bug Fest – University of Alabama Museums 04/02/2021

Bama Bug Fest – University of Alabama Museums

Like and follow Bama Bug Fest for updates on this year’s #BamaBugFest virtual event and exhibits! πŸ‘‡

Bama Bug Fest – University of Alabama Museums

03/26/2021

Ancient Art and Technology Weekend: The Story of Flint

03/26/2021

Ancient Art and Technology Weekend: Clovis Point Activity

03/24/2021

πŸ“’ : Hey, UA Museums Student Members! Take some time to get outside and enjoy nature with Dr. John Friel (Director of Alabama Museum of Natural History TODAY at 3 PM for an iNaturalist.org hike πŸ₯Ύ at Manderson Landing!

#UAMuseums #RollTide #Tuscaloosa #Alabama #Nature #Hike #Hiking

02/18/2021

The University of Alabama Museums are teaming up with the OLLI at UA for a four-week class about our πŸ’» virtual programming in 2020! To register for the class, visit: πŸ”— https://olli.ua.edu/

#UAMuseums #RollTide #Tuscaloosa #Alabama #Museums

02/02/2021

TOMORROW at 11 AM: πŸ‘‰ Hey, The University of Alabama Museums Student Members! Come hang out with UA Museums for a Virtual Coffee Hour via Zoom. β˜•

To become a Student Member, fill out this online form:
πŸ”— https://buff.ly/32eflV9

Timeline Photos 01/10/2021

πŸ“Ί : Watch today's episode of Discovering Alabama about the Alabama Indigenous Mound Trail on Alabama Public Television at 11:30 AM! πŸ‘‡

"The Alabama Indigenous Mound Trail" -- this morning (1/10) at 11:30am. ​The world-renowned earthen Indian mounds at Moundville Archaeological Park are among the nation’s most impressive remnants of prehistoric human habitation. Around 1200 AD the site was the cultural center of native populations in the southeast. Less known are the many other prehistoric mound sites in Alabama, some dating back thousands of years and, like Moundville, revealing archaeological evidence of changing lifeways across the span of time. #DiscoveringAlabama #TheAlabamaIndigenousMoundTrail #mounds #archaelogy

01/07/2021

#ThrowbackThursday: πŸ‘‰ Reflecting the beautiful πŸ’š greens and πŸ’™ blues of Moundville Archaeological Park and Museum!

01/01/2021

Hope your 2021 is off to a great start! Happy New Year from The University of Alabama Museums! πŸŽ‰

12/25/2020

#HappyHolidays from UA Museums! πŸŽ„ To find out more about πŸ—“οΈ when our museums will be reopening in the new year, visit: πŸ”— https://buff.ly/38eUlzj

We hope to see everyone in 2021! πŸŽ‰

#UAMuseums #RollTide #Tuscaloosa #Alabama #Museum #Museums

12/14/2020

#DYK: πŸ‘‰ December 14th is recognized as #NationalAlabamaDay by National Day Calendar! Learn about the great state of Alabama with the Alabama Museum of Natural History, The Gorgas House Museum, Moundville Archaeological Park and Museum, Mildred Westervelt Warner Transportation Museum, Office of Archaeological Research, Discovering Alabama, and the Department of Research & Collections!

About UA Museums πŸ”— : https://bit.ly/2Wfr2ao
National Alabama Day πŸ”— : https://bit.ly/2LAArXU

#UAMuseums #RollTide #Alabama

12/10/2020

DECEMBER 13 at 11:30 AM: Watch Discovering Alabama on Alabama Public Television as Doug Phillips explores a number of monumental earthworks created by Alabama's First Peoples. These earthworks were built from the Gulf of Mexico to the northern mountains of the state.

πŸ”— : https://bit.ly/3qBUaqi

12/01/2020

Today is #GivingTuesday, which is the perfect day to support the The University of Alabama Museums' Archaeological Curation Program Fund! The generous support and continued involvement of our donors and friends allows us to sustain a high level of quality in our research, and to continue to grow our collections.

DONATE HERE: πŸ”— https://bit.ly/2Jy0wFN

Today is #GivingTuesday, which is the perfect day to support the The University of Alabama Museums' Archaeological Curation Program Fund! The generous support and continued involvement of our donors and friends allows us to sustain a high level of quality in our research, and to continue to grow our collections.

DONATE HERE: πŸ”— https://bit.ly/2Jy0wFN

11/24/2020

Meet Ruby, the Tree-Rex! She's The University of Alabama Museums' entry into TTown Tinsel! πŸŽ„ πŸ¦–

Tonight is the first night of TTown Tinsel! When you go, don’t miss UA Museums’ entry: Ruby the Tree-Rex! πŸŽ„ πŸ¦–

#TTownTinsel #RollTide #UAMuseums

Photos from The University of Alabama Museums's post 11/06/2020

Photos from The University of Alabama Museums's post

11/02/2020

#MoundvilleMondays - Native American Heritage Month

Learn about the history of #NativeAmericanHeritageMonth!

11/01/2020

πŸŽ‰ Celebrate #NativeAmericanHeritageMonth with Moundville Archaeological Park and Museum! πŸ‘‡

November is recognized as #NativeAmericanHeritageMonth! Join Moundville Archaeological Park and Museum in celebrating with an exhibit, a πŸƒ virtual 5K, a πŸ‘¨πŸ½β€πŸ³ cooking demonstration, a πŸ“· photo challenge, and a 🏺 pottery activity!

πŸ”— : https://bit.ly/3kLkVVE

10/22/2020

Kristen R. Koors, Cultural Resources Investigator for The University of Alabama, is in the spotlight for today's #ArchaeologyMonth interview.

βš’πŸ§ΉπŸ“˜πŸ–ŒπŸ“πŸ”

1. What is your educational background?
BA in Anthropology, Master's in Library and Information Studies, working on a BS in General Business currently as well as a GIS certificate

2. What is your current job?
My present title is Cultural Resources Investigator for The University of Alabama. I have a research position requiring expertise in coordinating all aspects of archaeological field investigations (scheduling, documenting on paper and digitally the environmental conditions and condition of cultural resources and historic properties), cartographic and other computer graphic productions, technical report preparation and editing, and conduct and oversee project collection curation once reports are final.

I also edit all of the technical reports that are produced by the Office of Archaeological Research for grammatical and data accuracy. Additionally, I plan Native American and federal agency government-to-government consultations, many times involving NAGPRA issues.

3. Your primary research interests?

My primary research interests involve tribal consultation and Southeastern Archaeology in general. Because I read and edit so many technical reports and need to have a broad knowledge of current issues in archaeology, I have very general research interests by necessity.

4. What motivated you to become an archaeologist or how did you become an archaeologist?

When I was a young teenager living in Selma, Alabama, Linda Derry and my cousin Julie Lyons, both archaeologists, had started an Explorer Post based on archaeology. They had us participate in local digs and do artifact analysis at the Cahawba Center for Archaeology. One of the digs we participated in was with The University of Alabama headed up by Dr. Vernon Knight. I only lived in Selma for about 9 months, but it was a very impactful time. I ended up loving that time so much that I enrolled at The University of Alabama and Dr. Knight became my advisor and is still a great mentor to me to this day. However, if it wasn't for those two fabulous and strong women influencing me very early, I may not be where I am today.

5. What is the most interesting archaeological site on which you’ve worked?

The most interesting site I have worked on thus far would be the Historic Creek town of Cusseta/Kasita on the Fort Benning military base in Georgia.

6. Who was your most influential mentor? How did they influence your work?

My three most influential mentors were Linda Derry, Julie Lyons, Dr. Vernon Knight, and Dr. Keith Jacobi. Linda and Julie were early influences who laid down a good foundation and love for historic preservation and archaeology and showed me that it was possible to have a career in archaeology. Dr. Knight helped to guide several decisions along my career path and taught me how to do fieldwork properly. I still follow his principles and practices today. Dr. Jacobi also helped guide me in several decisions along the way and was a person who made learning such fun. I took every class he offered. We ended up collaborating in different ways throughout the years and I value his opinion.

7. Do you work with volunteers? If so, how do interested people become volunteers?

I do work with volunteers. I work with them through the Moundville Native American Festival and have volunteered myself a few times to speak to children about archaeology as a practice and as a career choice. To volunteer at the Moundville Archaeological Park, contact Lindsey Gordon, Educational Outreach Coordinator for the park, at 205-371-8732.

8. What public archaeological site do you think best handles preservation and interpretation? why?

I am going to be blatantly biased here and plug Moundville Archaeological Park since I work there. Only about 10% of the site has been excavated. The thought is that technology will advance, and noninvasive techniques will be developed that can be used to continue to interpret the site. The museum does a good job of interpreting the site based on the materials that were unearthed during the large excavations of the 1930s as well as guidance from the experts who have worked at the site in more recent years.

9. What is your favorite thing about being an archaeologist?

My favorite thing about being an archaeologist is that every day is different, and I work with a great group of people who I respect and enjoy being around.

10. What is your least favorite thing about being an archaeologist?

Working in the Southern heat. The older I get, the less I enjoy it.

11. Who do you most admire in our field and why?

Stacye Hathorn, Dr. Heather Puckett, Dr. Ashley Dumas, and Dr. Brooke Persons are all strong female leaders in our field, and I have great trust in their work.

12. Do you have advice for people who want to pursue a career in archaeology?

If you are in it for the money, pick another career. Participate in a field school or two and see if you want to spend a lot of time outdoors with red bugs, ticks, and snakes. Lastly, in all likelihood, you will spend a lot of time away from home, especially in the early years of your career; be prepared for this.

13. How do you feel about the Hollywood and/or reality tv portrayal of archaeology?

There is a sense of adventure that is true in the field of archaeology. This is what is amplified on the movie/tv screen. The true reality of the adventure is more like, oh no, the company vehicle broke down again and I am in the middle of nowhere and have to try get it towed or fix it myself. Or perhaps, I just got the truck stuck in the mud and now I have to get the crew to help dig me out. And a little, β€œwait, do you hear that rattling, don’t move” thrown in for good measure.

14. What is your least favorite question that you are frequently asked by non-archaeologists and why?

Anything about dinosaurs and what is the coolest thing I have ever found.

15. What can the general public do to protect and preserve archaeological sites?

The general public should not pick up artifacts on public lands

17. What was the professional culture in archaeology like from a female perspective when you began your career?

I began my professional career in 1998. There were more males in the higher positions than females, but there were a lot of females in the profession. I felt like I was treated equally and given similar opportunities as the males and was expected to perform all the same tasks that the men were doing. I do feel I was expected to β€œbe one of the guys” and endure a lot of sexist jokes.

18. Do you think that your gender made it more difficult to become an archaeologist? If so, how?

I don’t think my gender made it more difficult to become an archaeologist. I do think my parents, especially my dad, worried about me making a living as an archaeologist. This was mostly because he didn’t really know anything about the field and of what he did know, it was hard physical labor that men performed.

19. What barriers or challenges unique to women did you encounter?

When I began my career, there were lots of sexist remarks and things said as jokes by my male colleges that you were expected to go along with or at the very least, not make a big deal out of. There were also some men in positions of authority taking advantage of that authority with, many times, younger, female students, employees, and colleagues.

20. What advantages unique to women did you enjoy?

I have done oral interviews on occasion where I felt it was an advantage to be a female. I think my gender allowed people to feel comfortable with me and open to sharing their experiences with me. I also believe that there is a solidarity between female archaeologists that exists. We tend to give each other support, especially those with children, because we know the additional challenges faced by being the female parent.

21. Does being a woman influence your interpretation of the archaeological sites that you excavate? If so, how?

Based on conversations about site interpretation that I have had, I don’t think so.

22. Are there ongoing stories or interpretations in archaeology that you think would be different if they had been interpreted by women?

I can’t think of a situation I have been in where an interpretation would be different based on the interpreter’s gender, but I am sure that they are out there.

23. Have you ever found something in the archaeological record that was specifically female? If so what? How did it make you feel?

I have found jewelry that was very feminine. I thought about the woman or girl who lost it and how they were feeling when they realized it was missing. I thought about the story that the piece of jewelry had to tell.

10/21/2020

Archaeology Month interviews continue with Lindsey Gordon, Education and Outreach Coordinator at
Moundville Archaeological Park and Museum

βš’πŸ§ΉπŸ“˜πŸ–ŒπŸ“πŸ” #ArchaeologyMonth #Archaeology #WomensHistory #ThisPlaceMatters #AHCSites

1. What is your educational background?

a. Double Major: BS in Chemistry and BA in Anthropology from the University of Mississippi

b. MA in Biological Anthropology California State University Los Angles

2. What are your primary research interests?

a. Public Archaeology, Biological Anthropology, Forensic Anthropology, Geophysics

3. What motivated you to become an archaeologist or how did you become an archaeologist?

a. It was all by accident. lol I attended field school at the University of Mississippi, and I worked on a site called Carson Mounds. It was at that field school that I learned about Geophysics and Biological Anthropology and I've kind of being doing it ever since.

4. What is the most interesting archaeological site on which you’ve worked?

a. Moundville
b. Midnight Cave Belize

5. Who was your most influential mentor? How did they influence your work?

a. Zora Neale Hurston: Taught me the importance of representation in a field of study and she was my introduction into anthropology. "You can't be what you can't see" -Dr. Marian Wright Edelman
b. Dr. Jay Johnson: He taught me the basics of archaeology and he taught me the importance of meticulous note taking. It's because of him that I keep a journal.

6. Do you work with volunteers? If so, how do interested people become volunteers?

Yes, we do work with volunteers. You can visit our website at
moundville.museums.ua.edu for more information.

7. What public archaeological site do you think best handles preservation and interpretation? why?

a. Is this a trick question. Moundville Archaeological Park.
i. I love the work that is done to preserve the park and the care that is taken to also include descendant communities in the preservation and interpretation of the park.
b. Biltmore Estate
i. I loved going there as a child. Even as a teenage I also thought their interpretive signage and tours were always well put together.

8. What is your favorite thing about being an archaeologist?

I learn something new every single day.

9. What is your least favorite thing about being an archaeologist?

Believe it or not, I don't like hot weather. Summer is my least favorite season.

10. Who do you most admire in our field and why?
All of the women that I have worked with and/or I have seen working in the field, seeing them help me become a better archaeologist and gives me hope and it's inspiring.

11. Do you have advice for people who want to pursue a career in archaeology?

Absorb as many skills that you can because you never know when you will need to use them.

12. How do you feel about the Hollywood and/or reality tv portrayal of archaeology?

I really don't like shows that encourage looting.

13. What is your least favorite question that you are frequently asked by non-archaeologists and why?
I don't think I have a least favorite question. But I most often get questions that would more than likely need to ask a paleontologist.

14. What can the general public do to protect and preserve archaeological sites?

If you are visiting or come across a site, "Visit with Respect" and leave all artifacts in place. Donate to archaeological sites and intuitions to further their preservation. Make sure to notify an archeologist if you come across a new site

17. What was the professional culture in archaeology like from a female perspective when you began your career?

Most of my colleagues and classmates were female but most of the Professors/Chairs and/or people in "powerful" academic and professional positions were men. I unfortunately did not have a chance to meet another African American female archaeologist until I was in graduate school, so I was typically the only African American in all of classes and represented a small majority at conferences and other archaeology driven talks and events.

18. What barriers or challenges unique to women did you encounter?

Being an African American female archaeologist in the state of Alabama has its challenges. Sometimes working with clients, if accompanied by other men, I would sometimes be overlooked as the person in charge or even as part of the crew. It can be dangerous at times. I have to always think about my safety. Racism still exists!

I have also had colleges to believe that because I am a woman, I couldn’t get things done. I've had to prove myself over and over again to get where I am and sometimes that can be struggle.

I never let anyone tell me that I can't do something. That is not their decision to make. With practice and tenacity, you can do anything you set your mind to.

19. Does being a woman influence your interpretation of the archaeological sites that you excavate? If so, how?

We all have recognized that we have bias, so yes it may influence.

20. Have you ever found something in the archaeological record that was specifically female? If so what? How did it make you feel?

I HAVE, with doing cemetery relocations, I often come across a lot of decorative hair pins/combs. Those that know me, know that I love my hair and I love to put different decorative items in myself. It always amazes me how the past always meets the present.

Videos (show all)

Museums From Your Home: Gulf Coast Archaeology - Water, Canoes, and Canals
Museums From Your Home: Coosa River Valley Archaeology - Part 2
Museums From Your Home: What Is Archaeology?
Museums From Your Home: Archaeology and the Main Street Enhancement Project
Museums From Your Home: Paleontology vs. Archaeology
Museums From Your Home: Coosa River Valley Archaeology
Museums From Your Home: Alabama Indigenous Mound Trail Part 3
Museums From Your Home: Alabama Indigenous Mound Trail - Part 2
Museums From Your Home: Gulf Coast Archaeology
Museums From Home: Alabama Indigenous Mound Trail - Part 1
OAR's Owlet - Check Up
Check out this incredible video πŸ“Ή of a fledgling owl spotted today at the Office of Archaeological Research!⁣ πŸ¦‰β£#UAMuseu...

Location

Category

Products

Archaeological Survey, Testing, and Mitigation, Cemetery Identification and Relocation, Remote Sensing, Architectural Assessments and Historic Documentation, Educational Outreach

Telephone

Address


13075 Moundville Archeological Park
Moundville, AL
35474

General information

Located at Moundville Archaeological Park, the University of Alabama's Office of Archaeological Research provides a variety of services for Cultural Resource Management (CRM) as well as research and educational opportunities.

Opening Hours

Monday 8am - 4:30pm
Tuesday 8am - 4:30pm
Wednesday 8am - 4:30pm
Thursday 8am - 4:30pm
Friday 8am - 4:30pm
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