Carolina Lowcountry and Atlantic World Program, College of Charleston

Carolina Lowcountry and Atlantic World Program, College of Charleston

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We must highlight and understand our connections. See here.
Carolina Lowcountry and Atlantic World Program, College of Charleston, Simon Lewis, Gullah Geechee Cultural Heritage Corridor Commission, Slater, Padmore
Barbados, now a republic, takes on the challenge to rebrand its image from being the "Barbados Model," a "plantation society," the "culture hearth" of the British colonial era. Assets reposed on the island will inform this generation through disclosure to all, including some who were enriched on the island. Proud stewards of a history that touched many. Barbados Museum & Historical Society, The History Forum, Carolina Lowcountry and Atlantic World Program, College of Charleston, Gullah Geechee Cultural Heritage Corridor Commission, Randy Sparks, Hopkins, Simon Lewis, Younge, Fernando Silas
South Carolina Humanities is pleased to announce the 2021 recipients of the Governor’s Awards in the Humanities and the Fresh Voices in the Humanities Awards.

The 2021 Governor's Awards in the Humanities
🏆 Michael Allen, National Park Service Ranger for the Gullah Geechee Cultural Heritage Corridor
🏆 Jannie Harriot, chairperson and charter member of the South Carolina African American Heritage Commission
🏆 Simon Lewis, Director of the Carolina Lowcountry and Atlantic World Program, College of Charleston
🏆 The Rice Museum in Georgetown, SC

The 2021 Fresh Voices in the Humanities Awards
🏆 Dr. Lydia Brandt, Associate Professor at the University of South Carolina
🏆 Tamara Herring, Executive Director of the Morris Center For Lowcountry Heritage
🏆 The Rev. Christopher B. Thomas, Director of the Benjamin E. Mays Historic Site
🏆 Dr. Kasie Whitener, novelist, business owner, and instructor at the University of South Carolina

Learn more about our award winners on our website. Tickets and table sponsorships are available for the October 21st luncheon and award ceremony.

https://schumanities.org/featured/2021-governors-awards-in-the-humanities-announced/
Coming up THURSDAY, March 18 at 6:00:
Carolina Lowcountry and Atlantic World Program, College of Charleston and the Department of History - College of Charleston will feature a talk by Lorri Glover, author of "Eliza Lucas Pinckney," the enthralling story of an innovative, highly regarded, and successful woman plantation owner during the Revolutionary era. Tracing her extraordinary journey and drawing on the vast written records she left behind, this engaging biography offers a rare woman’s first-person perspective into the tumultuous years leading up to and through the Revolutionary War and unsettles many common assumptions regarding the place and power of women in the eighteenth century. Lorri Glover is the John Francis Bannon Endowed Chair in the Department of History at Saint Louis University.
Attend via Zoom: https://cofc.zoom.us/j/95031307652?pwd=SGF2MXpIdFNDQW9YNFdhYmJjYVl5UT09&fbclid=IwAR0uSYnhlOQsNSlvRpbRJMHd5pb8CG3pjCxGFk2lslk-4fOb8Waj6gMKpk8#success
Discover more about the fascinating life of Eliza Lucas Pinckney! The Carolina Lowcountry and Atlantic World Program, College of Charleston (CLAW) & the Department of History - College of Charleston will host Dr. Lorri Glover to discuss her compelling new book, Eliza Lucas Pinckney: An Independent Woman in the Age of Revolution on March 18 at 6pm. https://linktr.ee/cofc_dept_of_history
I have been trying to collect stories of family's oral histories of slavery.... With the passing of each older person, stories of family members and events of the past are lost.... Where should I start to research my project ??

CLAW was established to promote scholarship on the Lowcountry, the Atlantic World, and the connectio

Operating as usual

10/02/2022

The Middle Passage Markers Project has a recording available from a recent session on Africans on the Mississippi: "The recording of our most recent session, the viewing and discussion of Africans on the Mississippi – Cuttin’ Cane, is now available on our YouTube channel until October 16, 2022. Thanks to all of you who joined us, and for those who were unable to attend, please enjoy this limited-time-only session."

VIEW THE SESSION ON YOUTUBE

Penn Center on St. Helena Island celebrates 160th anniversary 09/24/2022

Penn Center on St. Helena Island celebrates 160th anniversary

Penn Center on St. Helena Island celebrates 160th anniversary Penn Center on St. Helena Island celebrates 160th anniversary

09/20/2022

On Thursday, September 29, 2022, from 7-8pm ET, Middle Passage Ceremonies and Port Markers Project (MPCPMP) will broadcast Africans on the Mississippi – Cuttin’ Cane, a short film introduction to a five-part docuseries that explores the African American connection to water – extending from the Senegal and Gambia Rivers to the Atlantic Ocean to the Mississippi River. Winner of the IndieFest Film Award, this episode focuses on Donaldsonville, Louisiana, one of numerous Mississippi River Black communities that is a product of the era when hundreds of plantations lined the Mississippi River.

After the film, there will be a conversation with the creators and film makers, Darryl Hambrick and Spencer Howard, and an opportunity to chat live with them.

The event will take place live via Zoom Webinar and Facebook Live. Please find the registration link for the Zoom Webinar below.

Register for the Zoom Webinar

REGISTER FOR THE SESSION | RSVP ON FACEBOOK

MPCPMP chose this date to air the film to commemorate the 496th anniversary of the first shipment of captive Africans who arrived in North America at Sapelo Sound, GA, on September 29, 1526, almost 100 years before the 1619 Point Comfort/Jamestown arrival, to build the Spanish settlement, San Miguel de Gualdape. Join us as we promote the stories of places that share the history and legacy of the Middle Passage.
Thank you,

Ann L. Chinn
Chair, Executive Board

09/20/2022
09/19/2022
09/17/2022

📕 When wordsmiths walk into Paper Based Bookshop asking for The Big Dictionary, this is the one they mean. 📕

Dingolay to dreevay, tootoolbay to tantie, bubulups to badjohn, Lise Winer’s tome of lexicography is a linguistic work of art. Long considered the definitive scholarly guide to the way Trinis and Tobagonians speak, this is a living monument to the expressiveness, character and full-fledged historical import of our English Creole. Highly sought after as a reference guide by locals and foreigners alike, you’ll find this famous red, white, and black-bound hardcover on the shelves of students, teachers, researchers, musicians, writers, historians, analysts, artists, politicians, even presidents!

Dictionary of the English/Creole of Trinidad & Tobago (McGill-Queen's University Press) understands that language is an animate, ever-evolving thing, and the results speak for themselves. Investing in this essential Caribbean text means furnishing the storehouse of not only your vocabulary, but the word-vaults of generations after you, with ever-deepening meaning.

From Charleston to Philadelphia: The Grimké Sisters and Their Legacy — Historic America 09/15/2022

From Charleston to Philadelphia: The Grimké Sisters and Their Legacy — Historic America

From Charleston to Philadelphia: The Grimké Sisters and Their Legacy — Historic America Despite being born into a wealthy, slave owning family in Charleston, sisters Sarah and Angelina Grimké would go onto to become some of the first female abolitionists in American history. After converting to Quakerism and moving to Philadelphia, the Grimké sisters became prominent anti-slavery and...

Africa holds up a mirror to India 09/15/2022

Africa holds up a mirror to India

Africa holds up a mirror to India Shobana Shankar's new book, 'Africa, India and the Spectre of Race' (Hurst/Oxford, 2021) explores this complicated history.

Lorna Goodison on what the Queen meant to Jamaicans 09/10/2022

Lorna Goodison on what the Queen meant to Jamaicans

Lovely tribute by Lorna Goodison -- balancing personal affection against political opinion.

Lorna Goodison on what the Queen meant to Jamaicans Her Majesty will always be tied to the island’s colonial past, but to the Jamaican poet laureate she was still their Queen

The Stono Rebellion of 1739: Where Did It Begin? 09/10/2022

The Stono Rebellion of 1739: Where Did It Begin?

The incomparable Nic Butler on the Stono Rebellion -- exactly 283 years ago.

The Stono Rebellion of 1739: Where Did It Begin? In early September 1739, dozens of enslaved men residing near the Stono River launched a violent campaign to gain their freedom. The events of that bloody uprising, commonly called the Stono Rebellion, form a pivotal and well-known episode in the history of South Carolina, but our understanding of i...

College to Host Conference on Stono Rebellion 09/06/2022

College to Host Conference on Stono Rebellion

College to Host Conference on Stono Rebellion Two powerful historical events that indicate the desire of enslaved Black people to seek freedom rather than sit idly by prior to the Civil War are the 1822 uprising in Charleston organized by Denmark Vesey and the Stono Rebellion of 1739 in southern Charleston County. The City of Charleston just ma...

Seeking | The Gullah Religious Tradition 09/05/2022

Seeking | The Gullah Religious Tradition

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8uP1Y-3Cemc

Seeking | The Gullah Religious Tradition Joining the church, at one time, was an ancestral African tradition called seeking. The practice was based in the thought that since God and the ancestors co...

09/02/2022

Our call for volunteers to help transcribe Civil War naval muster rolls went live on the Northumbria University website today- more below?

A new UK-led project will help tell the stories of British and other immigrant sailors in the American Civil War in ways never before possible.

The “Civil War Bluejackets” Project—so named because of the distinctive uniform worn by U.S. Civil War sailors—is a collaboration between historians at the Northumbria University and computer scientists at the University of Sheffield and the University of Koblenz-Landau. Funded by the UK Arts and Humanities Research Council, the project launches on 6 September 2022 with a call for citizen volunteers to help transcribe tens of thousands of Civil War “Muster Rolls”, documents that were carried on board U.S. ships and which capture the personal details of the c.118,000 men who fought on water for the Union between 1861 and 1865. The project team are making use of the online Zooniverse platform to share tens of thousands of these Muster Rolls, and are asking the public to help in revealing their contents.

Principal Investigator Professor David Gleeson of Northumbria University said: “We are calling on “people-power” to help us tell the story of common sailors in the Civil War in a way never before possible. We estimate that over 30 percent of these men were British or Irish immigrants—another 15 percent were African American. With your help, we aim to create a new freely available database of these men, and use the information generated by citizen scientists to explore the social and military experiences of these ordinary people in a way never before possible.”

As well as using public transcriptions to decipher the Muster Rolls, the team also hope to develop new software to allow computers to “read” 19th century hand-writing. Co-Investigator Dr Morgan Harvey of the University of Sheffield commented: “By comparing the public’s transcriptions with the original 19th century hand-writing, we hope to “train” computers to assist in the reading and deciphering of historic documents, thereby creating a major new tool in the armoury of anyone interested in uncovering the past.”

Included among the stories the team hope to reveal are the thousands of English, Scottish and Welsh men who helped the U.S. battle the Confederacy on water. The project will also look to discover more about some of those who returned to home shores—men like George H. Bell from North-East England, whose remains rest today in Elswick Cemetery, Newcastle Upon Tyne. In November 1864, George was awarded the Medal of Honor—the U.S. equivalent of the Victoria Cross—for his extraordinary courage off the coast of Texas during the American Civil War.

Those interested in finding out more about the project can visit the www.civilwarbluejackets.com website, or go direct to the Zooniverse Civil War Bluejackets page

Anthony Ashley Cooper, Lord Shaftesbury 09/02/2022

Anthony Ashley Cooper, Lord Shaftesbury

Another neat potted biography -- of Anthony Ashley Cooper, first Earl of Shaftesbury -- by former CLAW-person Professor Emeritus Peter McCandless: https://mycandles.blogspot.com/2022/08/anthony-ashley-cooper-lord-shaftesbury.html?fbclid=IwAR0ZqNzwrvlFC0HNBGtuouIrzAJINqVRuZHVi5gT4EzR1UNSApSXcQs-ljA

Anthony Ashley Cooper, Lord Shaftesbury Visitors to Charleston, South Carolina quickly become familiar with two names: Ashley and Cooper. The Charleston peninsula, where the town w...

REVIEW: The brilliance of Rothman's 'The Ledger and the Chain' 09/02/2022

REVIEW: The brilliance of Rothman's 'The Ledger and the Chain'

REVIEW: The brilliance of Rothman's 'The Ledger and the Chain' Timothy B. Tyson, a historian of the South, calls Joshua D. Rothman's "The Ledger and the Chain: How Domestic Slave Traders Shaped America" one of the best history books he's ever read.

Editorial: Stono Rebellion isn't a happy part of SC history, but it's worth remembering 08/31/2022

Editorial: Stono Rebellion isn't a happy part of SC history, but it's worth remembering

Sorry I missed this when it was published (Aug 25th). Slave Dwelling Project/CLAW program conference coming up at the end of next week.

Editorial: Stono Rebellion isn't a happy part of SC history, but it's worth remembering Next month, a group of scholars will convene in Charleston to share their understanding of colonial America's most deadly revolt of enslaved African Americans. The event underscores how the Stono

Timeline photos 08/31/2022

More on Gwendolen Midlo Hall from a site that knows a thing or two about representing slave history itself.

We mourn the loss of Dr. Gwendolyn Midlo Hall (June 27th, 1929 - August, 29th, 2022) beloved friend of Whitney Plantation and renowned historian of African culture and contributions throughout the Americas. Dr. Hall's book, Africans in Colonial Louisiana, is considered the seminal book of Afro-Creole history and has received numerous awards. Perhaps Dr. Hall's most monumental work is her contributions to the field of African American genealogy. Hall built the Louisiana Slave Database composed of 107,000 entries documenting the people enslaved in Louisiana from 1719 with the arrival of the first slave ship directly from Africa to 1820 when the domestic slave trade from the East Coast became the almost exclusive supplier of slave labor to the Lower South. Hall found the names of the enslaved people in official documents located in parish courthouses, the notarial archives, the Old US Mint, the public library in New Orleans, the state archives in Baton Rouge and university special collections. Beyond plantation inventories and criminal cases, Hall also identified enslaved people in wills, marriage contracts, leases, seizures for debt, mortgages of slaves, and reports of deaths. Whitney Plantation's Alles Gwendolyn Hall is named in her honor and contains the 107,000 entries found in her database. The database has helped thousands of African Americans find ancestors, connect families, and trace cultural roots. Gwendolyn Midlo Hall taught at the University of New Orleans and Rutgers University, and been recognized by numerous professional awards. She was a prolific writer of articles and books, most of whose subjects deal with African-American and Afro-Creole Culture. We are eternally grateful for Gwendolyn Midlo Hall's contributions to African American history and for her loving support of Whitney Plantation. Rest in power. We will miss you.

08/23/2022

A creek, near to Savannah, and bordered by plantations with slave villages, was named Runaway Negro Creek from 1785 until at least 1875.
Runaway Negro Creek, located 8 miles SE of downtown Savannah, GA, Nestled next to the Skidaway Island State Park.
It did not formally appear on any map until 1906.
The creek was often referred to as Habersham Creek. That creek was the site of some military action during the American Civil War.
It wasn’t until April 2019, that the United States Board on Geographic Names voted to rename the creek Freedom Creek.

08/23/2022

Today is the International Day for the Remembrance of the Slave Trade and its Abolition.

Today is the International Day for the Remembrance of the Slave Trade and its Abolition.

The night of 22-23 Aug 1791 saw the beginning of the Haitian Revolution leading to the overthrow of slavery in Saint-Domingue and independence on the island, in 1804.

Our research guide, relating to Slavery and the British transatlantic slave trade, highlights some of the most useful records in the archive to understand the history of slavery across the British Empire.

Our guide is presented in a very factual manner and does not address the horrors and violence of the transatlantic slavery and all forms of slavery. By sharing these important resources, we support this act of remembrance and actively encourage further research in this area.

https://nationalarchives.gov.uk/help-with-your-research/research-guides/british-transatlantic-slave-trade-records/

📷: CO 137/111/1

Loyalist by Marriage: Sarah Izard Campbell 08/22/2022

Loyalist by Marriage: Sarah Izard Campbell

CLAW fans have probably found their way to Peter McCandless's blog-site by now, but if you haven't, you might be interested in this recent posting on Sarah Izard Campbell: https://mycandles.blogspot.com/2022/08/loyalist-by-marriage-sarah-izard.html?fbclid=IwAR1UPU5uzuI1b4M_s4nO8215oMUzLycuJS9PVIoENp7a8RieKIVrrCyUCoc

Loyalist by Marriage: Sarah Izard Campbell In Revolutionary South Carolina, people became Loyalists for various reasons. Some held office under the British government and/or had taken...

08/21/2022

The first Merikins arrived in Trinidad in May 1815, and settled in Laventille and Caroni as preparations were not yet in place for their arrival. By the time the third group arrived in November 1815, land had been cleared in the Naparima district in south Trinidad for distribution. In many cases, the First Peoples were tasked with clearing this land.

The fourth and largest group of Merikins arrived in 1816 and also settled in the Naparima district. Forty-two women captured from a French slaver that had landed in Barbados also joined the Merikin settlements in 1817 and another group of about 95 people arrived from Halifax, Canada in 1821.

The Merikins were each granted 16-acre lots in remote areas in Moruga, where they settled according to the six companies of the Colonial Marines. They initially occupied land without any evidence of ownership but this was later petitioned by the Merikins.

From 1847 to 1848, they were given deeds to their land with proper titles and were required to pay an annual rent. They initially engaged in subsistence agriculture and sold their produce in the markets. Among the principal crops grown were corn, pumpkin, plantain and rice.

As the Naparima settlements were located close to sugar estates, many undertook employment on the estates during crop time. With the discovery and exploration of oil in the late nineteenth century, many Merikins went to work on the oil fields or entered into land lease agreements with the oil companies.

This photo of a map showing the Merikens’ Refugee Settlements is courtesy of the book “The Merikins: Forgotten Freedom Fighters in the War of 1812” (2015) by Tina Maria Dunkley.

References:

NATT Exhibition on the Merikins, available in PDF format on our website via https://natt.gov.tt/sites/default/files/pdfs/Celebrating-the-Merikins.pdf.

Dunkley, Tina Maria. The Merikins: Forgotten Freedom Fighters in the War of 1812. Plain Vision Publishing, 2015.

Weiss, John McNish. The Merikens: Free Black American Settlers in Trinidad 1815-16. McNish & Weiss, 2002.

These books are part of the National Archives of Trinidad and Tobago’s Reference Collection.

08/20/2022

Tomorrow marks 206 years since the largest group of Merikins arrived in Trinidad on August 20th 1816.

From 1815 to the 1820s, Trinidad became home to over seven hundred formerly enslaved Black people from the American South who had served in the British Colonial Marines during the War of 1812 in the US.

In exchange for their service, they were freed from slavery in the US and given land on which to settle in Trinidad. Known as the Merikins—an abbreviated version of the word, “Americans”—they settled mainly in six Company Villages in isolated forested areas in South Trinidad during a time when slavery was still being practiced.

The cultural heritage of the Merikins is kept alive today by descendents of the Merikins both in and out of the Company Villages. Organizations like the Merikin Commission, Merikin Inc. and the Merikin Heritage Foundation, which were formed by members from the community, work to educate the public on the rich history of these freedom fighters.

Our exhibition, “Celebrating the Merikins” provides some history on the Merikins and their cultural heritage. Follow this link to view or download the exhibition:https://natt.gov.tt/sites/default/files/pdfs/Celebrating-the-Merikins.pdf

At the National Archives, we have a Merikin Collection, which includes colonial correspondence and records pertaining to the arrival of the Merikins in Trinidad.

08/20/2022

Tomorrow marks 206 years since the largest group of Merikins arrived in Trinidad on August 20th 1816.

From 1815 to the 1820s, Trinidad became home to over seven hundred formerly enslaved Black people from the American South who had served in the British Colonial Marines during the War of 1812 in the US.

In exchange for their service, they were freed from slavery in the US and given land on which to settle in Trinidad. Known as the Merikins—an abbreviated version of the word, “Americans”—they settled mainly in six Company Villages in isolated forested areas in South Trinidad during a time when slavery was still being practiced.

The cultural heritage of the Merikins is kept alive today by descendents of the Merikins both in and out of the Company Villages. Organizations like the Merikin Commission, Merikin Inc. and the Merikin Heritage Foundation, which were formed by members from the community, work to educate the public on the rich history of these freedom fighters.

Our exhibition, “Celebrating the Merikins” provides some history on the Merikins and their cultural heritage. Follow this link to view or download the exhibition:https://natt.gov.tt/sites/default/files/pdfs/Celebrating-the-Merikins.pdf

At the National Archives, we have a Merikin Collection, which includes colonial correspondence and records pertaining to the arrival of the Merikins in Trinidad.

The opera "Omar," on a Muslim slave in America 08/16/2022

The opera "Omar," on a Muslim slave in America

The opera "Omar," on a Muslim slave in America "Omar," an opera that recently had its world premiere, tells the story of Omar Ibn Said, a 19th century Muslim scholar stolen from Senegal and sold into slavery in America, who left behind a remarkable autobiography written in Arabic. Correspondent Martha Teichner talks with Rhiannon Giddens and Mic...

08/11/2022

Good to see how widely the upcoming conference is being promoted. If you haven't already checked out what's on offer, please make a point of doing so now!

Register today by clicking link 🔗in bio‼️

We are pleased to announce Dr. Edda L. Fields-Black, Associate Professor, Carnegie Mellon University in the Department of History as one of our keynote speakers at the 7th national Slave Dwelling Project: the Stono Rebellion and the Atlantic World. Dr. Fields-Black has written numerous scholarly studies on the trans-national history of West African rice farmers, including Deep Roots:

Rice Farmers in West Africa and the African Diaspora and the forthcoming book, ‘Combee’: Harriet Tubman, the Combahee River Raid, and Black Freedom during the Civil War, which will be released Juneteenth 2023 and is the first full-length study of Harriet Tubman’s Civil War activities. The conference will take place at College of Charleston in partnership with National Underground Railroad Network to Freedom Program and Carolina Lowcountry and Atlantic World Program (CLAW) at the College of Charleston and presented by The 1772 Foundation.

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66 George St
Charleston, SC
29424

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66 George St
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The MUSC College of Pharmacy has a rich tradition of educating outstanding pharmacists for more than 100 years. Every day, we build on that foundation and break new ground in each area of our trifold mission: education, research, and patient care.

College of Charleston Friends of the Library College of Charleston Friends of the Library
Addlestone Library, 205 Calhoun St
Charleston, 29401

They built the library of the future. Now it's time to ensure the future of the library. Join the Friends of the Library in this important effort!

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Chem and Biochem at the College of Charleston Chem and Biochem at the College of Charleston
66 George St
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Find us on Twitter @CofCChem