Room to Thrive

Room to Thrive

Comments

Source: Room to Thrive
"Get over it" might be one of the most retraumatizing things that someone can say to an abuse survivor. Variations on the phrase like, "let that s**t go," or "move on" and even "trauma is not your fault, but it's your responsibility to heal" are equally dismissive.

Almost every single cult survivors I've met has heard the above phrases, even from well-intended loved ones who genuinely want to see us heal and thrive. The issue is that these phrases, and even those good intentions, come from a fundamental misunderstanding of trauma, how it wires the nervous system, and the long process that cult survivors face in integrating to the "real world."

To quote psychoanalyst Lorna Goldberg, from her article in a 2006 issue of theCultic Studies Review,

"I have worked with several individuals who told me that entrance into the world outside the cult is complicated by the fact that their cultic upbringing has left them deprived of many coping skills to adapt to that task. They have difficulty adjusting to the problems that the external world presents and difficulty dealing with a variety of situations that others would find to be commonplace.

The lack of mastery of these coping skills is exacerbated by the former cult member’s impoverished sense of identity, poor self-esteem, and fear of the outside world.
[...]

Furthermore, cult members are constantly exploited and shamed. This treatment leads many into believing they are failures because of their lack of success in the cult. This is true even if they left as a result of their recognition of cult hypocrisy or felt proud of their ability to leave a destructive environment."

Goldberg ends her article saying that cult survivors can lead rich, full lives.

However, our culture's tendency to want to obscure or speed the recovery process does more harm than good.
One of the best ways we can support someone in their healing is to hold space for their experiences without trying to fix anything.

To quote Room to Thrive, "There’s a great deal of healing potential here if we’re willing to sit with survivors without giving in to our impulse to fix it, solve it, make it go away, or in this example, ascribe responsibility."
"There is a common piece of advice that flows through many cultures once touched by Christian missionaries: Do unto others as you would have done to yourself.

What few of these well meaning warriors of Christ had ever paused to contemplate was that others might not wish to have done what you would wish for, and that this adage, taken to it’s conclusion, has always been one with the potential for causing catastrophic harm."

https://neuroclastic.com/2021/05/06/review-sensory-trauma-autism-sensory-difference-and-the-daily-experience-of-fear/?fbclid=IwAR0eyYw4KxbyJjD2P7w9ztXXeryQathyhjqguH6mJn4HEXM5jm2B2Y_2eyM
This relates to my previous post. Stop telling POC to be calm. Deal with the source of our fear instead!

This applies to our parenting as well. Rather than expecting our kids to calm down when they’re upset, let’s address the root issues and provide them with what they need.

#untigering #PeacefulParenting #GentleParenting #RespectfulParenting #ConsciousParenting #DecolonizingParenting #AsianParenting #AsianAmerican #AsianMentalHealth

Image: Room to Thrive
#deconversion #faith #deconstruction #leavingthechurch #religioustraumasyndrome
Source: Room to Thrive
Hey! My research partner and I are conducting a survey on the ways in which religious support and substance use can impact perceived adversity during the COVID-19 pandemic. The survey should take no more than 10 minutes, and all responses will remain anonymous. You have the right to withdraw at any time. Feel free to distribute the link as you see fit. Click the link in my bio for the survey. We really appreciate your time!
Hey! My research partner and I are conducting a survey on the ways in which religious support and substance use can impact perceived adversity during the COVID-19 pandemic. The survey should take no more than 10 minutes, and all responses will remain anonymous. You have the right to withdraw at any time. Feel free to distribute the link as you see fit. Click the link in my bio for the survey. We really appreciate your time!
While I haven't often detailed my deconstruction experience or my journey out of a deeply conservative, evangelical background—religious trauma is an issue that I care deeply about.

While I may have opportunities in the coming months to offer my story in a more comprehensive manner, I wanted to share this article, not only because it's powerful, but because a good friend of mine—who co-founded the Religious Trauma institute—was quoted.

If you're interested in following Brian's work, I highly recommend his page: Room to Thrive

For anyone that has ever sent me a note of encouragement or expressed appreciation for my voice—you can also thank Brian, as he has been an integral part of my journey.
This is such an important message. Please read Brian’s (Room to Thrive) insights below.

I don’t trust folks who want me to feel calm before I feel safe.

I've spent much of my life appearing calm, pleasing and appeasing, and feeling powerless. When well-meaning folks encouraged me to talk deep breaths with long slow exhales, I dutifully went along as best I could even when it was difficult to breathe.

The calm they promised almost never arrived, and the experience often reinforced what I already knew — I could survive their good intentions like everything else, by going along and doing what was expected even though it didn't feel safe. What looked like calm was actually dissociation.

We humans require some level of safety before our nervous systems allow us to be at ease. A long exhale is a beautiful thing when there's enough safety to sink into the experience of calm. Without safety, however, trying to feel calm is putting the cart before the horse.

I never felt truly at ease until I discovered the calm after a primal roar, the quite strength after harnessing my aggression, and the safety that only ensues from moving into and through fight/flight physiology.

I don't think I've ever successfully taken a deep breath that resulted in me feeling calm before I felt safe. However, I've come to appreciate how my lungs naturally expand after escaping to safety and the spontaneous sigh of relief that flows easy after neutralizing a threat.

Perhaps there is a shortcut, and we can breathe our way to safety. Maybe I wasn't trying hard enough or doing it correctly. In my experience, my nervous system didn't need slow easy breaths, it needed to feel strong in order to feel safe, and those breaths were quick and forceful inhales and exhales.

It's hard to describe, but there's an earned sense of safety that comes from doing what needed to be done and saying what needed to be said. Before achieving this sense of safety, deep breaths felt forced. From a place of safety, they come more naturally as a result of trusting my ability to defend and protect myself.

Each person's journey is unique and there are many ways to be human. I'm offering my experience as an alternative to what, for me at least...
Love these thoughts from @roomtothrive on Instagram:

"I'm learning to re-identify people I don't like as people with whom I don't feel safe. It's changing my entire perspective." -Michael Rupp
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
My friend Michael shared this idea today, and it really resonated with me.
There's a significant shift here that honors and prioritizes our need for safety. This isn't about what "types of people" we prefer, it's not about personalities, it's not even about our assessment of another's character. It's simply about trusting our body and prioritizing our safety.
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
Why is this shift so useful? Here are a few things that come to mind...
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
1) With more awareness of our felt-sense experience, we can access our internal and external resources more effectively.
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
2) When we're more aware of our felt sense of safety, we can begin to detect threats sooner, giving us more time and space in which to respond.
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
3) "I don't like them" tends to focus on, well, them. Whereas, "I don't feel safe" invites us to focus on what we can do in the service of our safety e.g., set boundaries, reach out to others, take some form of action, etc.
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
4) The reason I feel this shift is so significant is because it invites us to trust our bodies. We don't need to explain all the reasons why we don't like someone, it is enough that we don't feel safe.
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
I'd love to hear your thoughts about this subtle but profound shift.
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
-Brian”

#untigering
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
HT Room to Thrive
Love this from over at Room to Thrive

I'd prefer to belong than fitting in. You?

https://m.facebook.com/story.php?story_fbid=2533321403612406&id=1747280545549833

Resolve Religious Trauma and experience safety, vitality, and connection. Religious Trauma Therapy & Trauma-informed Coaching. I help survivors resolve religious trauma, so they can live a life of vitality, meaning, and connection. -Brian Peck, LCSW

Operating as usual

Eve - Stars from Streetlights 01/01/2022

Eve - Stars from Streetlights

This song from Stars From Streetlights is brilliant!

Many of us carry the weight of unquestioned and unexplored stories around with us. This song reimagines the story of Eve from a more empowering place.

“I am curious and I am not ashamed.”

Lyrics

Eve - Stars from Streetlights

I’ve been thinking about Eve
She ate the apple from the one forbidden tree
She was curious, oh god, he was furious

He said, “I told you you would surely die, if you believed the serpents lies. It’s dust you are, to dust you will return.”

Who am I without you?
I am strong enough without you
Can I live without you?
I am strong enough

I’ve been eating from that tree
My opened eyes, I’ve found my sight
Now my mind has been set free
I am curious
And I’m not ashamed

I’ve left the garden far behind
The serpent’s words were never lies
It’s dust I am, to dust I will return

Who am I without you?
I am strong enough without you
Can I live without you?
I am strong enough

I just wanted to be powerful
I wanted to know the truth
But you were keeping secrets
When I was at my weakest
I just wanted to be powerful

Who am I without you?
I am strong enough without you
Can I live without you?
I am strong enough

Words and music by Austrian Banman and Steve Birss

#Deconstruction #ReligiousTrauma

Eve - Stars from Streetlights Eve means life. Within the Christian mythology, Eve is the first woman and she has come to represent many things for many people. For some, she represents th...

11/03/2021

Two years ago, I was laying in bed scrolling through Facebook when I encountered the original meme "Trauma is not your fault, but healing is your responsibility."

Like many of you, I had a visceral response to the dismissive "but" and the individualistic notion that "healing is your responsibility."

After jotting down a few thoughts in the notes folder of my phone, I went to bed thinking I might eventually create a post to share on my page.

When I awoke the following morning, I knew I had to say something. Survivors needed to know...

Trauma is not your fault. [period]

So, I copy/pasted my thoughts from my notes folder, created the accompanying meme, and hit publish.

I had no idea the post would be shared over 41k times, reach over 2 million folks on Facebook alone, and be republished on The Mighty, Yahoo Lifestyle, and numerous blogs and websites.

It still feels surreal that these late-night musings sparked an ongoing conversation about trauma and our collective responsibility to support the healing process.

I've learned so much from all of you who have shared your insights in the comments and via messenger and email.

Thank you!

Here's to the collective wisdom of this amazing community!

-Brian

#Trauma #ReligiousTrauma #RoomToThrive

Trauma is not your fault. (Period)

(Take all the time you need for that to sink in)

Over the past several years, the following phrase/meme has made its rounds.

“Trauma is not your fault, but healing is your responsibility.”

There’s something about it that never sat well with me, and last night I jotted down a few of my thoughts. I’d love to know what you think.

Folks who’ve experienced trauma are familiar with the dismissive “but” that often follows, “trauma is not your fault, but...”

“...but I should have fought back.”

“...but I shouldn’t have gone to that party.”

“...but I should have seen the red flags.”

“...but what were you wearing?”

“...but healing is your responsibility.”

This last “but” appears well-intentioned while still carrying a similar weight of individual responsibility for a process that is rarely possible on one’s own.

It has that familiar individualist ring to it that has folks grabbing for their bootstraps while standing alone in their suffering.

Trauma is not your fault. Period.

*long pause*

I can’t begin to describe the importance of that full stop or the healing potential contained within the space that follows.

As soon as we add a “but...” we knock some of the air out of this realization. It feels like a punch in the gut or that sinking feeling that accompanies “...but I should be over it by now.”

While the idea of personal responsibility comes with a bit of hope, it also comes with pressure. In my experience, this burden outweighs the hope for many trauma survivors.

When pressure outweighs hope, it’s no longer empowering. Embodied hope has the potential to be a resource for a survivor’s nervous system. Pressure, on the other hand, comes with the risk of overwhelming one’s nervous system or keeping it stuck in freeze/collapse physiology.

Trauma is already an isolated place, and making healing “your” responsibility remains limited to one person. Trauma already feels like a personal failing or weakness, and “your responsibility” adds one more shortcoming to your list, that of not yet healing.

Something happens when we add a well-placed full stop at the end of, “Trauma is not your fault [full stop]”

This pause creates some much-needed space. A space that is frequently punctuated with a sigh of relief. It’s a place without a dismissive “but...” or added pressure of any kind. This pause may be the first time a survivor feels heard and understood.

It’s important to hang out here for a while.

There’s a great deal of healing potential here if we’re willing to sit with survivors without giving in to our impulse to fix it, solve it, make it go away, or in this example, ascribe responsibility.

To be clear, I believe in survivors’ capacity for healing, which is why I’m passionate about helping to create a supportive and empowering context. I’m not convinced that saying, “...,but you’re responsible for your healing” creates a supportive context.

We don’t heal alone. We’re social mammals who require the presence of another nervous system for critical developmental tasks, and our ability to co-regulate is vital for healing trauma.

Humans need to feel safe, strong, and connected, and we’d be well-served to keep these in mind as we search for what to say next.

So, what do we say to a trauma survivor after they’ve had the space and time to acknowledge trauma is not their fault?

Here are a few possibilities:

“...and healing is possible.”

“...and you have the capacity to heal within safe and supportive relationships.”

“...and I’m committed to being here with you as a resource for your nervous system.”

What would you add?

Again, I assume the original idea is offered with the best intention. However, language is powerful and “but” is often dismissive and may do more to reinforce trauma physiology than to create a context for healing.

I also recognize that each person’s experience is unique, and the original phrase may be helpful for some folks. If that’s the case for you, I validate your experience and celebrate what works for you!

If, however, you’ve felt uneasy when you encountered the original phrase, I’d love to hear your reaction to my rambling thoughts above.

-Brian

#Trauma #ReligiousTrauma #RoomToThrive

Photos from Room to Thrive's post 10/20/2021

Acknowledgement is a simple, powerful way of showing respect.⠀

Room to Thrive is located on the ancestral homeland of the Shoshone & Bannock peoples.⠀

I celebrate & honor the rich history, diverse cultures, and embodied wisdom of those who first called this land home.⠀

I acknowledge that I live, work, and recreate on land that is sacred to the original inhabitants of the Boise Valley.⠀

I acknowledge the US Government exploited and forcefully removed the Shoshone & Banock people to acquire this land.⠀

I acknowledge the many ways religion & white-bodied supremacy continues to subjugate Indigenous people and exploit their land.⠀

I acknowledge the historic, intergenerational, and ongoing trauma of the Shoshone & Bannock people.⠀

We must work to correct the stories and practices that erase Indigenous people’s history and culture.⠀

Text your zip code to 855-917-5263 to find out which Native Land you’re living on.⠀

I invite you to acknowledge and honor Native Land in the comments.⠀

#HonorNativeLand #ShoshoneBannock #ShoshoneBannockTribes #BannockTribe #ShoshoneTribe #IndigenousLivesMatter #Boise #IndigenousPeoples #IndigenousLand #IndigenousHistory #ReligiousTrauma #AdverseReligiousExperiences #Deconstruction #RoomToThrive

Photos from Room to Thrive's post 10/20/2021

I’ve selected the Trevor Project for my Birthday charity this year.⠀

The Trevor Project is a life-saving resource for LGBTQ young people — 24/7 and always free.⠀

Together, we can make sure that LGBTQ youth who need support nationwide know they are not alone.⠀

You can donate to the Trevor Project year round, but if you want to help me celebrate my birthday (October 25th) with a donation, this fundraiser will run through the 31st.⠀

There’s a link to donate on my profile’s Linktree.⠀

A special thanks to my clients who’s contributions allow me to provide free and reduced-cost support for LGBTQIA+ survivors of religious trauma.⠀

With deepest gratitude,⠀

-Brian⠀

The Trevor Project's 24-hour crisis support line is 1-866-488-7386 or text "start" to 678-678⠀

#ReligiousTrauma #AdverseReligiousExperiences #TrevorProject #TheTrevorProject #MentalHealthAwareness #SupportOurYouth #LGBTQ #LGBTQIA #SuicidePrevention

Photos from Room to Thrive's post 10/12/2021

🚪 I'm sorry for the closets I built when I valued my religion more than your humanity.⠀

🏳️‍🌈 I deeply regret the suffering I caused others with my harmful beliefs and behaviors.⠀

I was wrong.⠀

My beliefs were dehumanizing and harmful.⠀

You deserved so much more.⠀

📐 I think about how closets are designed and built. From a trauma perspective, I think about the survival function closets serve within societies that demonize the humanity of others.⠀

🔑 I think about the space outside of the closet, and I ask myself, what am I doing to make it less cruel, dehumanizing, and uninhabitable? What am I doing to celebrate, cherish, and affirm the humanity of others?⠀

As a trauma therapist, I recognize the adaptive survival function of freeze/collapse and please/appease physiology in situations that are unsafe. These nervous system responses allow us to survive when there aren’t other options available to us.⠀

⏸️ Pause with me for a moment and consider that are folks existing in closets because it's unsafe to come out.⠀

Do you feel the weight of that? Do you feel personal responsibility for creating enough safety for others to move freely in the world?⠀

I do, and I recognize that LGBTQIA+ folks deserve more from me — from all of us.⠀

There's no shame in being in the closet or doing whatever is necessary to survive.⠀

There's no shame in coming out in whatever way feels safe and authentic to you.⠀

If there’s any shame around coming out, it’s in the shameful way we treat LGBTQIA+ folks.⠀

I played a role in creating the need for closets, and for that I am deeply sorry. I was wrong. I'm taking responsibility for my previous behavior by committing to new, humanity-affirming behavior.⠀

❤️ You are loved.⠀

🤗 You are valued.⠀

👭 You are appreciated.⠀

🎉 You are celebrated!⠀

🌎 You deserve to feel safe in the world.⠀

-Brian⠀

❤️ 🧡 💛 💚 💙 💜 💗 💙 🖤⠀

#ReligiousTrauma #LGBTQIA  #LGBTQ #Pride🌈 #Affirming #ComingOut #ComingOutDay #Pride #LGBT #Deconstruction #Exvangelical #LoveIsLove #EqualityMatters #LoveWins #Equality #Evangelical #ToxicTheology #AdverseReligiousExperiences #RoomToThrive

Photos from Room to Thrive's post 10/09/2021

Why does Marketing trigger my Religious Trauma?⠀

🔹 Is it the message that I'm inherently flawed & broken without this product?⠀

🔹 Is it the claim that this product alone can save me?⠀

🔹 Is it the appeal to fear reminiscent of every altar call I've experienced?⠀

🔹 Is it the "expert" who claims to know more about what I need than I do?⠀

🔹 Is it the Peer Pressure or how shame is leveraged?⠀

🔹 Is it the artificial sense of urgency or The abysmal lack of ConsenT? ⠀

🔹 Is it the feigned interest or the blatant attempt to convert me?⠀

🔹 Is it the feeling I'll be "left behind" or that I'm not "one of the chosen?"⠀

🔹 Is it the way my survival instincts are repeatedly exploited for another's profit?⠀

What would you add to this list?⠀

Be sure to check out my conversation with Emily Ann Peterson “What do Altar Calls & Sales Funnels Have in Common?”⠀

You can find the IGTV video in my previous post.⠀

Here’s to continued healing and growth!⠀

-Brian⠀

#ReligiousTrauma #Marketing #AdverseReligiousExperiences #Deconstruction #Exvangelical #ToxicTheology #ToxicReligion #RoomToThrive

10/05/2021

I was thinking about this line from Tara Westover’s memoir Educated tonight and wanted to share it with you.⠀

"We are all of us more complicated than the roles we are assigned in the stories other people tell." -Tara Westover⠀

Here’s to living beyond the constrictive roles you’ve been assigned in the stories other people tell.⠀

Here’s to being more generous with the roles you assign to others in your own narrative.⠀

-Brian⠀

#ReligiousTrauma #Deconstruction #RoomToThrive

I was thinking about this line from Tara Westover’s memoir Educated tonight and wanted to share it with you.⠀

"We are all of us more complicated than the roles we are assigned in the stories other people tell." -Tara Westover⠀

Here’s to living beyond the constrictive roles you’ve been assigned in the stories other people tell.⠀

Here’s to being more generous with the roles you assign to others in your own narrative.⠀

-Brian⠀

#ReligiousTrauma #Deconstruction #RoomToThrive

08/31/2021

Over these past few weeks, I’ve been thinking a lot about this quote from Lisa Feldman Barrett…⠀
"The best thing for your nervous system is another human and the worst thing for your nervous system is another human."⠀

I’m reminded that our ability to co-regulate each other's nervous systems can be both a powerful resource for safety and connection, and a source of disconnection and harm.⠀

If you’re new to my account, my name is Brian Peck, I’m a licensed clinical social worker, my pronouns are he/him, and I’m glad you’re here!⠀

I’m white, middle-aged, cisgendered, and mostly straight…although I’m uncomfortable with simplistic binaries.⠀

I’m a parent to two amazing humans.⠀

My partner and I have been together for over 16 years, and she’s largely responsible for the relative security our family enjoys.⠀

I owe so much to the humans in my life who care enough to challenge me to do better.⠀

I have more questions than answers, and I wouldn’t trust myself to do this work if it weren’t for the diverse group of colleagues and friends I’ve personally invited to call me in when they see me engaging in behavior that’s not congruent with my values.⠀

There are many ways to resolve religious trauma, and what works for one person may not work for another. It’s my sincere hope that each of us will connect with resources that encourage us to trust ourselves more on our healing journeys.⠀

I value your perspective, welcome your skepticism, and appreciate your feedback.⠀

Thank you for caring enough to challenge me to do better, and for the many ways you’ve been the best thing for my nervous system!

-Brian⠀

#ReligiousTrauma #AdverseReligiousExperiences #Trauma #PolyvagalTheory #SomaticExperiencing #RoomToThrive

Over these past few weeks, I’ve been thinking a lot about this quote from Lisa Feldman Barrett…⠀
"The best thing for your nervous system is another human and the worst thing for your nervous system is another human."⠀

I’m reminded that our ability to co-regulate each other's nervous systems can be both a powerful resource for safety and connection, and a source of disconnection and harm.⠀

If you’re new to my account, my name is Brian Peck, I’m a licensed clinical social worker, my pronouns are he/him, and I’m glad you’re here!⠀

I’m white, middle-aged, cisgendered, and mostly straight…although I’m uncomfortable with simplistic binaries.⠀

I’m a parent to two amazing humans.⠀

My partner and I have been together for over 16 years, and she’s largely responsible for the relative security our family enjoys.⠀

I owe so much to the humans in my life who care enough to challenge me to do better.⠀

I have more questions than answers, and I wouldn’t trust myself to do this work if it weren’t for the diverse group of colleagues and friends I’ve personally invited to call me in when they see me engaging in behavior that’s not congruent with my values.⠀

There are many ways to resolve religious trauma, and what works for one person may not work for another. It’s my sincere hope that each of us will connect with resources that encourage us to trust ourselves more on our healing journeys.⠀

I value your perspective, welcome your skepticism, and appreciate your feedback.⠀

Thank you for caring enough to challenge me to do better, and for the many ways you’ve been the best thing for my nervous system!

-Brian⠀

#ReligiousTrauma #AdverseReligiousExperiences #Trauma #PolyvagalTheory #SomaticExperiencing #RoomToThrive

Resolve Religious Trauma

Hi, my name is Brian Peck, I’m a licensed clinical social worker, my pronouns are he/him, and I understand religious trauma.

You deserve to work with someone who understands the life-altering impact of adverse religious experiences. Not only do I get it, I’ve devoted my professional life to helping survivors resolve their religious trauma.

As a Therapist, I help survivors resolve their religious trauma with body-based therapy and resources.

As a Coach, I empower folks who have been harmed by religion, to clarify their values and learn to trust themselves with trauma-informed coaching and resources.

Videos (show all)

Transforming Shame
You are enough.
Religious Trauma & Race
An Experiment in Connection
Post-traumatic Growth
It's okay to be human.
Social Connection while Social Distancing
How Can Curiosity Help You Thrive After Religion?
There's Power in Your Story
You do not have to be good.
The ACT Question

Location

Category

Products

Religious Trauma Therapy available in Idaho
Trauma-informed Coaching available online

Telephone

Address


6126 W State Street Suite 406
Boise, ID
83703

Opening Hours

Monday 9am - 5pm
Tuesday 9am - 4pm
Wednesday 9am - 4pm
Thursday 9am - 6pm
Friday 10am - 5pm
Other Personal Coaching in Boise (show all)
Passion Provokers Passion Provokers
951 E Front St, Suite 420
Boise, 83712

Dynamic Relationship and Forgiveness Mentoring and Coaching! We offer short-term packages at the highest impact for you to find love, to build love, and/or to heal love.

Diamond Life Fitness Diamond Life Fitness
10051 W Smoke Ranch Dr
Boise, 83709

My purpose is to create a culture of Fun Fitness through advanced mentorship, one-on-one counseling for health and exercise, & new and innovative movements

Arbor CrossFit Arbor CrossFit
2516 S. Apple St.
Boise, 83706

We offer a friendly and fun atmosphere that welcomes everyone! Our Arbor CrossFit team is here to inspire, motivate and support you as you transform yourself mentally and physically. Join us and start making fitness the best part of your day!

Daily Tarot Daily Tarot
Boise

The Daily Tarot is dedicated to inspiring others via the art of Tarot. Life is a journey full of ups and downs and I want to share my gift those looking for insight, inspiration, and coaching though daily tarot draws, videos, group readings and more.

Spring Acupuncture & Wellness Spring Acupuncture & Wellness
5622 W State St
Boise, 83703

At Spring we make health simple by using cutting-edge skills, compassion, and practicality to provide whole-person health care through acupuncture, Chinese herbology, and life coaching.

73 Athletics LLC 73 Athletics LLC
Boise, 83687

Athletic training and fitness consultation group for personal health goals and sports training for all ages.

Melissa Plumeau-Fitness Melissa Plumeau-Fitness
816 W Bannock
Boise, 83702

Kick ass fitness at your fingertips. Workouts, playlists, tips for success, recipe links and more! Welcome to my world.

Allie Smith Figure Allie Smith Figure
4585 S Cloverdale Rd
Boise, 83709

Empowering women to create sustainable fitness solutions. Train to be strong and the weight loss will follow!

Cristin Russell: Illuminated Life & Soul Energy Coaching Cristin Russell: Illuminated Life & Soul Energy Coaching
Boise

Coaching to help you open to new possibilities for yourself and your life by awakening and aligning with the deeper layers within you.

Empower U Life Coaching Empower U Life Coaching
Boise, 83705

Empower U Life Coaching offers life coaching to empower individuals with awareness, strategies, encouragement, and support as they identify and achieve their personal desires in life.

Dalton Baseball Dalton Baseball
10460 W Fairview
Boise, 83704

Baseball and Softball | Think Like A Champion Series Camps every Fall and Winter Select Teams Year Round

TRIM Coach Nique TRIM Coach Nique
Boise, 83704

Life transformation, whether it be nutritional, mindset or vision of the future is 100% Mindset Chan