AMWA at IAU College of Medicine

AMWA at IAU College of Medicine

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American Medical Women's Association branch at International American University College of Medicine

Thank you for taking the time to check out our page, we are the International American University College of Medicine Branch of the American Medical Women's Association. Our goal is to bring together those in medicine and health-related fields to promote women's advancement in medicine and support our members' professional and personal development. About the American Medical Women's Association (A

Operating as usual

Covid-19 has changed and so has our immunity. Here’s how to think about risk from the virus now | CNN 21/09/2023

The CDC estimates that 97 percent of people in the country have some sort of immunity to COVID-19 through vaccination, infection or both. However infections are on the rise again and more people are testing positive, but our immune systems are better with fighting the virus and providing immunity.

Covid-19 has changed and so has our immunity. Here’s how to think about risk from the virus now | CNN Experts say it’s less risky to catch Covid-19 than it used to be, but there are still good reasons not to treat it casually.

21/09/2023

Here are some ways to take care of your mental health:

💜Talk to someone you trust
💛Do some physical activity, like going for a walk
🧡Do things you enjoy
💚Give yourself time to rest
❤Know that having a bad day does not make you a bad person!

Up-and-coming physicians even more burned out than their senior colleagues, survey finds 21/09/2023

Up-and-coming physicians even more burned out than their senior colleagues, survey finds

[Via Fierce Healthcare]
Medical students and residents are no strangers to the widespread burnout taking a toll on America’s physician workforce. The Physicians Foundation recently released new survey data that shows residents and med students reported more mental health difficulties than practicing physicians

Up-and-coming physicians even more burned out than their senior colleagues, survey finds Recent survey data from The Physicians Foundation suggest residents and medical students are no strangers to the widespread burnout weighing down America’s physician workforce. | Medical students—and, in some cases, residents—more frequently reported mental health difficulties than practicing ...

5 Things the Anti-Aging Industry Won’t Tell You 01/09/2023

Today's Must Watch 📽
5 Things the Anti-Aging Industry Won’t Tell You

5 Things the Anti-Aging Industry Won’t Tell You With the anti-aging industry raking in over $261 billion in the last year, there's never been a better time to get smart about what you're putting on your body. Elizabeth O'Brien has five things the anti-aging industry won't tell you. Photo: Getty.

Cancer Runs in Families. Too Few Are Getting Tested. 01/09/2023

Cancer Runs in Families. Too Few Are Getting Tested. Doctors are recommending genetic tests to more cancer patients. The results are helping doctors choose newer targeted drugs and encourage relatives to confront their own cancer risk

Cancer Runs in Families. Too Few Are Getting Tested. Doctors are recommending genetic tests to more cancer patients and their families. Costs have dropped, and the results are helping doctors choose newer targeted drugs.

Are Fish Oils on the Hook for AF Risk? 17/08/2023

Today's must-read 📰

Are Fish Oils on the Hook for AF Risk? Some studies of fish oil supplements have shown a higher risk for atrial fibrillation with marine omega-3 fatty acids. Is it real? What are the implications for patients taking these capsules?

New COVID Shots Will Be Available in September 16/08/2023

For people who are considering now whether they should get the currently available COVID vaccine or wait until the new one comes out, Cohen said that depends on a person's individual risk. People who are 65 or older or who have multiple health conditions should go ahead and get the currently available shot if it's been more than 6 to 8 months since their last dose. For all other people, it's OK to wait for the new version.

New COVID Shots Will Be Available in September "We are likely to see this as a recommendation as an annual COVID shot, just as we have an annual flu shot."

Racial and Ethnic Identity and MD-PhD Training Program Attrition 03/08/2023

Black med students 50% more likely to leave MD training, study finds

JAMA Internal Medicine
New research found that half of Black medical students leave MD-PhD training before finishing, a percentage that is way higher than that of their peers

Racial and Ethnic Identity and MD-PhD Training Program Attrition This cohort study analyzes the attrition rates of students from MD-PhD training programs by race and ethnicity.

Women in medicine often delay starting families, face infertility challenges, study finds 03/08/2023

Female doctors often delay starting a family and face higher rates of infertility because of the hours required for medical training and career pressures. For female physicians, the competing priorities of parenthood and career will remain a difficult choice.

Women in medicine often delay starting families, face infertility challenges, study finds Female physicians often delay starting a family, in part due to career-related pressures and the hours required for medical training and residency programs. The competing priorities of parenthood a | Female physicians are not paid as well as their male counterparts nor do they have the same career o...

Long COVID 'Brain Fog' Confounds Doctors, but New Research Offers Hope 07/07/2023

Experts agree that long COVID may damage the brain. An April 2022 study published in the Nature Journal found strong evidence that SARS-CoV-2 infection may cause brain-related abnormalities, for example, a reduction in gray matter in certain parts of the brain, including the prefrontal cortex, hypothalamus, and amygdala. Additionally, white matter, which is found deeper in the brain and is responsible for the exchange of information between different parts of the brain, may also be at risk of damage as a result of the virus, according to a November 2022 study published in the journal SN Comprehensive Clinical Medicine.

Long COVID 'Brain Fog' Confounds Doctors, but New Research Offers Hope "I just can’t think anymore," she said. "It makes you realize that you’re nothing without your brain. Sometimes I feel like a shell of my former self."

Columbus researchers achieve medical breakthrough 06/07/2023

Nationwide Children's Hospital has produced a breakthrough treatment for a rare genetic disorder. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration recently approved Elevidys, the first gene therapy meant to treat Duchenne muscular dystrophy in patients 4 through 5 years of age

Columbus researchers achieve medical breakthrough They developed a treatment for Duchenne muscular dystrophy

Maternal deaths in the US more than doubled over two decades. Black mothers died at the highest rate 06/07/2023

[Via Associated Press]
According to a new study, published in the Journal of the American Medical Association, maternal deaths have more than doubled in the last 20 years. The study found that all racial and ethnic groups had high maternal mortality, but the highest rates were among Black and Native American women

Maternal deaths in the US more than doubled over two decades. Black mothers died at the highest rate A new study in the Journal of the American Medical Association shows maternal deaths across the U.S. more than doubled in two decades in unequal proportions.

What the end of affirmative action means to a fourth-year medical student 06/07/2023

The U.S. Supreme Court's landmark ruling that overturned affirmative action could have many repercussions for the medical education industry. Many medical education leaders view the ruling as a "seismic shift" in higher education.

What the end of affirmative action means to a fourth-year medical student STAT asked a fourth-year medical student about what affirmative action has meant to her, and about the wider impact of the recent Supreme Court ruling.

High Salt Intake Linked to Atherosclerosis Even With Normal BP 12/04/2023

💡The finding suggests that salt could be a damaging factor in its own right before the development of high blood pressure

High Salt Intake Linked to Atherosclerosis Even With Normal BP A high intake of sodium was associated with both cardiac and carotid atherosclerosis, even in people with normal blood pressure, a large cohort study from Sweden suggests.

SARS-CoV-2 Crosses Placenta and Infects Brains of Two Infants 08/04/2023

SARS-CoV-2 Crosses Placenta and Infects Brains of Two Infants: 'This Is a First'

Researchers have found for the first time that COVID infection has crossed the placenta and caused brain damage in two newborns, according to a study published online today in Pediatrics

[Via Medscape]

SARS-CoV-2 Crosses Placenta and Infects Brains of Two Infants It is the first study to confirm cross-placental SARS-CoV-2 transmission leading to brain injury in a newborn.

COVID in Pregnancy May Affect Boys' Neurodevelopment: Study 28/03/2023

Boys born to mothers infected with SARS‐CoV‐2 during pregnancy may be more likely to receive a diagnosis of a neurodevelopmental disorder by age 12 months, according to new research.

[Via Medscape]

COVID in Pregnancy May Affect Boys' Neurodevelopment: Study Boys -- but not girls -- born to mothers infected with SARS‐CoV‐2 during pregnancy were more likely to have a neurodevelopmental disorder by age 12 months, but the risk appeared to wane over time.

What's Driving the 'World's Fastest-Growing' Brain Disease'? 28/03/2023

A common chemical that is used in correction fluid, paint removers, gun cleaners, aerosol cleaning products, and dry cleaning may be the key culprit behind the dramatic increase in Parkinson's disease (PD), researchers say.
[Via Medscape]

What's Driving the 'World's Fastest-Growing' Brain Disease'? A common chemical that's used in everything from paint remover to dry cleaning solution may dramatically increase the risk of Parkinson's, 'the world's fastest growing brain disease.'

By the next RSV season, the US may have its first vaccine | CNN 03/11/2022

Some doctors say this season for respiratory syncytial virus infections is shaping up to be one of the most severe the country has seen. After decades of trial and error, 4 new RSV vaccines may bring some hope for the future. These 4 vaccines may soon be ready for review by the FDA with more than a dozen others in testing.

By the next RSV season, the US may have its first vaccine | CNN It's shaping up to be a severe season for respiratory syncytial virus infections -- one of the worst some doctors say they can remember. But even as babies struggling to breathe fill hospital beds across the United States, there may be a light ahead: After decades of disappointment, four new RSV vac...

The Health Risks of Getting Covid-19 a Second (or Third) Time 06/07/2022

Protection provided by vaccines and prior infection has greatly improved Covid outcomes since the pandemic’s early days, and reinfections are typically less severe than initial ones. Yet each new infection carries a risk of medical problems, including hospitalization, death and long Covid, according to preliminary data from a study of patients in the Veterans Affairs health system.

The Health Risks of Getting Covid-19 a Second (or Third) Time New research details the risks of Covid-19 reinfection as more-infectious Omicron subvariants circulate.

Photos from Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health's post 28/06/2022
How Japan achieved one of the world’s lowest COVID-19 death rates 21/06/2022

A core pillar supporting the low death rate was the underlying good health of Japan’s population. The country has the longest life expectancy in the world, and was one of only six OECD members not to see a reduction in 2020.

Just 5% of Japanese people are obese, one of the conditions that increases the risk of severe illness from COVID, versus 36% of the population in the U.S.

https://www.japantimes.co.jp/news/2022/06/18/national/science-health/japan-coronavirus-deaths-low/

How Japan achieved one of the world’s lowest COVID-19 death rates Health experts point to continued mask wearing, extensive vaccination and an already healthy population as the core factors behind its success.

Brain fog after COVID-19 has similarities to ‘chemo brain,’ Stanford-led study finds 15/06/2022

“We found that even mild COVID can cause prominent inflammation in the brain that dysregulates brain cells and would be expected to contribute to cognitive impairment,” said Michelle Monje, MD, PhD, professor of neurology and neurological sciences.

The overlap between what happens in COVID-19’s cognitive aftermath and chemo brain, as it’s colloquially known, could be good news for patients because it may speed research on treatments, Monje said. “The exciting message is that because the pathophysiology is so similar, the last couple of decades in cancer therapy-related research can guide us to treatments that may help COVID brain fog.”

🌐:https://med.stanford.edu/news/all-news/2022/06/brain-fog-covid-chemo-brain.html

Brain fog after COVID-19 has similarities to ‘chemo brain,’ Stanford-led study finds Researchers found that damage to the brain’s white matter after COVID-19 resembles that seen after cancer chemotherapy, raising hope for treatments to help both conditions.

Most workers who died of COVID in 2020 had something essential in common, study finds 04/06/2022

The death rate of low socioeconomic position adults, those whose education attainment level did not go beyond a high school diploma, was five times higher when compared to high socioeconomic position adults, and the mortality rate of intermediate socioeconomic position adults was two times higher.

“We need really strong worksite protections against airborne pathogens,” he said. “It’s got to go beyond, ‘In certain situations, wear a well-fitting mask.’ .... Employers can do a lot to help keep people safe. But even members of the community, and those of us lucky to be working from home, the more we can reduce community spread of the virus the more we can protect people in these positions that are in the line of fire.”

https://www.miamiherald.com/news/coronavirus/article262129007.html

Most workers who died of COVID in 2020 had something essential in common, study finds Most working-age Americans who died of COVID-19 during the first year of the pandemic were so-called essential workers in labor, service and retail jobs that required on-site attendance and prolonged contact with others, according to a recently published study led by a University of South Florida ep...

Food allergy is associated with lower risk of SARS-CoV-2 infection 04/06/2022

A National Institutes of Health-funded study has found that people with food allergies are less likely to become infected with SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, than people without them. In addition, while previous research identified obesity as a risk factor for severe COVID-19, the new study has identified obesity and high body mass index (BMI) as associated with increased risk for SARS-CoV-2 infection. In contrast, the study determined that asthma does not increase risk for SARS-CoV-2 infection.

🔗: https://bit.ly/3GFt1Lf

Food allergy is associated with lower risk of SARS-CoV-2 infection NIH study finds high BMI and obesity raise infection risk, but asthma does not.

How Australia Saved Thousands of Lives While Covid Killed a Million Americans 17/05/2022

"A lifesaving trait that Australians displayed from the top of government to the hospital floor, and that Americans have shown they lack: trust, in science and institutions, but especially in one another"
[via The New York Times]

How Australia Saved Thousands of Lives While Covid Killed a Million Americans The United States and Australia share similar demographics, but their pandemic death rates point to very different cultures of trust.

25/04/2022

Vaccines are among the most successful and cost-effective public health tools available for preventing infectious disease and death.

We almost forget about the seriousness of diseases like polio and measles thanks to the protections of vaccinations.

National Infant Immunization Week is a great time to learn about the vaccines your baby needs.

If you have questions about childhood immunizations talk to your pediatrician.
View the latest child immunization schedule: cdc.gov/vaccines/parents/index.html

Estrogen and COVID-19: Is there a link? 16/03/2022

📰 Today's must read

Estrogen and COVID-19: Is there a link? A recent observational study from Sweden suggests that women with higher levels of estrogen may have a lower risk of severe COVID-19.

Dr. Sanjay Gupta: Is America ready to take the next step in its Covid-19 recovery? 12/03/2022

Despite recent CDC guidelines changes, COVID-19 is not endemic yet.
Smallpox was 'endemic' when it killed somewhere between a third and half a billion people in the 20th century. Malaria is endemic, and it's killing millions. Tuberculosis is endemic, and HIV/AIDS was sort of thrown out of people's consciousness by just labeling it 'endemic,'. To say that this pandemic has gone endemic right now is failure.

Dr. Sanjay Gupta: Is America ready to take the next step in its Covid-19 recovery? As we reach the second anniversary of the World Health Organization acknowledging Covid-19 as a pandemic on March 11, 2020, we appear to be standing on the edge of the endemic phase of this global health crisis. For many, that's the moment when we hope we can get back to our regular lives.

Predicting the next booster 31/01/2022

Today's must read 👓

Predicting the next booster The next big scientific discussion bubbling to the surface is the potential of another booster: Will SARS-CoV-2 continue to mutate to escape antibody protection? Do we need another booster? If so, what’s the next formula?

Omicron: What the Data Really Show 01/12/2021

As long as we have COVID-19 infections, we will have variants. The way to beat this pandemic is to get the world vaccinated to reduce the chances for this virus to mutate and further prolong the pandemic.

[Via Medscape]

Omicron: What the Data Really Show Dr F Perry Wilson summarizes the hard facts about the latest SARS CoV-2 variant, Omicron— transmissibility, pathogenicity, and immune escape potential.

Photos from Florida Department of Health (DOH)'s post 08/10/2021
Photos from AMWA at IAU College of Medicine's post 19/08/2021

Vaccine Boosters are NOT unusual

18/08/2021

Important announcement 👇

18/08/2021

Let's talk epidemiology 💡

Pediatric numbers: 3 things to keep an eye on

There’s no lack of anecdotal evidence that pediatric hospitals are reaching capacity in many states. But, anecdotal evidence can be very different than population-level evidence. So, what are we seeing on a population-level? And, is there anything we should be concerned about?

***Epidemiology***
In the past week, 121,427 kids tested positive for COVID19, which represented 18% of the weekly reported cases in the United States. This is increasing at an exponential rate, but adult cases are also increasing exponentially.

In 23 states, 1.9% of child COVID-19 cases resulted in hospitalization. Last Saturday, 1,902 kids were hospitalized for COVID19. The CDC has also made MIS-C (serious condition associated with COVID-19) data publicly available. As of July 31, 4,404 kids were diagnosed with MIS-C associated with COVID19 in the United States.

We are very lucky that kids aren’t as high of risk for severe disease as older adults. But, even given this, I’m still concerned about three things…

***First, the rate in which hospitalizations are increasing.*** We are far beyond the January peak, which is particularly apparent in the South (second graph). This could be due to pandemic fatigue (we just don’t care anymore). Or this could be due to Delta being more serious than previous variants. There is preliminary evidence from Scotland and Canada that adult hospitalization is more severe with Delta. We have yet to see kid data, but I don’t have reason to believe that it’s different.

***Second, pediatric ICU (PICU) capacity.*** We desperately need to flatten the pediatric hospital curve. Only ~38% of kids have “natural” immunity and the majority of kids aren’t eligible for vaccines, which means we have an estimated 34 million susceptible children in the United States. If 1.9% of infected children are hospitalized, 33% of the kids go to the PICU, and the average hospital stay is 4 days, that means we need 6,800 PICU beds. The U.S. only has 4,500 PICU beds total. (If you want to check the math, go to this amazing thread by Dr. Denise Dewald).

We could easily overwhelm our pediatric hospitals. And this is just with COVID19. RSV is also at an all time high. Car accidents and drownings, for example, are also still happening in the background. We can’t just put kids in adult hospital beds. Kids aren’t tiny adults, they need special equipment, correct dosages, and trained hospital staff (who are getting more and more difficult to find because they are burned out). We also can’t just systematically fly children from Texas (where hospitals are full) to Maryland (where hospitals aren’t full).

What schools do (or do not do) will impact case growth and, thus, impact how our hospitals fare too. A group of scientists in North Carolina modeled what may happen across schools that implement masks and/or surveillance testing. Without masks or regular testing, up to 90% of susceptible students may become infected by the end of the semester.

***Third, kids’ role in the transmission chain.*** Yesterday, an important study was published in JAMA. Scientists sought out to answer how kids of all ages transit COVID19 in Canadian households from June 1 and December 31, 2020. They studied both the index cases and the rate of transmission in the household.

Out of 89,191 households, 6,280 households had a pediatric index case
-The proportion of index cases increased with age. For example, 12% of households had an index case aged 0 to 3 years and 38% had an index case aged 14 to 17 years
-Younger index cases had a higher proportion associated with a school/childcare outbreak than older kids
-Kids aged 4 to 8 years and 9 to 13 years had higher proportion with no symptoms reported compared with index case individuals aged 14 to 17 years or aged 0 to 3 years

1717 households (27%) experienced secondary transmission (i.e. spread in the house)
-Of these households, the index case passed it, on average, to 2 other household members
-Younger children (aged 0-3) were more likely to transmit SARS-CoV-2 compared with older children (aged 14-17). This was irrespective of factors such as symptoms, school/childcare reopening, or school/childcare outbreaks.

This study tells us that we will not stop transmission in the community without stopping transmission among kids, especially younger kids. This is not only important for pediatric health, but also for adults’ health and to stop this virus from mutating.

***Bottom Line:*** We aren’t sure if this pediatric case increase is the iceberg or just the tip of the iceberg. Delta may be changing the severity of disease, but we have yet to see the science for children. Children could certainly overwhelm hospitals and play an important role in transmission. The next few months will be critical for our children and our community.

Love, YLE

As always, there are more graphs and figures (and all the data sources) in my newsletter here: https://yourlocalepidemiologist.substack.com/p/pediatric-numbers-3-things-to-keep

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Our Story

Thank you for taking the time to check out our page, we are the International American University College of Medicine branch of the American Medical Women's Association.
Our goal is to bring together those in medicine and health-related fields to promote women's advancement in medicine and support our members' professional and personal development.

About the American Medical Women's Association (AMWA):
AMWA is comprised of women physicians, residents, medical students, pre-medical students, health care professionals, and supporters. Founded in 1915, AMWA is the oldest multi specialty organization dedicated to advancing women in medicine and improving women's health.

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