DoPeace.org-Al-Falah Mohammadpur

Sazzad Ali, Hasan Mohammad, and Mr. Ahmed Ilias of Al-Falah manage this page with the mission of pr Access is the priority.

DoPeace, in conjunction of Al-Falah Bangladesh, is implementing an innovative model that combines technology with traditional teaching. We strive to give access to the impoverished children in the slums to pre-school education, discouraging them from becoming a street child with no education. To facilitate access, we open basic classrooms within the slum community for the parents to bring childre

Operating as usual

04/06/2019

Md.Izhar L.C
Coaching Class

28/05/2019


Center: Nezamkhursaidi L.C
Teacher: Afsana Akter Putul.

06/05/2019

Mohammad Sazzad Ali

Assalamu Alaikum
Ramadan Mubarak to everyone.

Alhamdulillah.

Endless gratitude to Allah for letting us enter into the most blesssed month, Ramadan for yet another time.

May He enable us to adhere to all the DO's and avert all the DON'Ts ever so sincerely.

May the ultimate goal of attaining TAQWA, be accomplished in true sense.

Ameen.

Photos from DoPeace.org-Al-Falah Mohammadpur's post 02/05/2019

Representative Mr. Dewan Abu Wasek Surprised visit at the two learning center of Market Camp & Geneva Camp Afternoon Pre-School Class and Evening Coaching Classes.

02/05/2019
Photos from DoPeace.org-Al-Falah Mohammadpur's post 31/07/2017
31/07/2017

Dear NGO partners, staff, teachers, and the supporters:

DoPeace is proud of your commitment to our mission to educate small children in the slums. Our wide range of supporters would like to hear directly from each of the DoPeace members about their daily activities. Please click the following links and like the pages so you can the posts from each other and from our supporters. Thank you.

https://www.facebook.com/DoPeaceUSA/
https://www.facebook.com/DoPeaceMohammadpur/
https://www.facebook.com/dopeacerangpur/
https://www.facebook.com/dopeacemirpur/
https://www.facebook.com/dopeacesaidpur/
https://www.facebook.com/dopeacechittagong/
https://www.facebook.com/dopeacehouston/
https://www.facebook.com/DoPeaceBangladesh/
https://www.facebook.com/DoPeaceorg-RBNS-Saidpur-129567630983368/
https://www.facebook.com/DoPeaceorg-EAKOK-Mirpur-1818597541788422/
.org

Check out this link

21/07/2017

World’s unique method of mass educating the poorest of the poor

Tens of thousands of children who have graduated from DoPeace learning centers in the last three years are in more than 100 preschools throughout Bangladesh.

The DoPeace model of solving the educational problem in the slums is already one of the worlds unique low-cost methods for rapid implementation on the mass scale. We enroll 10,000 poorest of the poor disadvantaged children into the DoPeace school system every year. This at a low-cost of $1 per child per month.

The quality of our preschool graduates is well known among the primary schools within the community. All of our eligibile graduates get rapid admission to grade one. Thus, we have avoided the cost of starting our own schools which will otherwise require millions of dollars.

Rapid and high quality of education for the masses-that is what our seven local NGOs and more than 100 teachers and staff are accomplishing - making the world a better place for the poorest of the poor children.

Photos from DoPeace.org-Al-Falah Mohammadpur's post 16/07/2017

My 7th Visit to Bangladesh
Education in the Slums
Post 3: The haunting past
I was at the Panel Discussion at Al-Falah in the Geneva Camp in Mohammadpur and at PBUS in Mirpur, both located in Dhaka. We have instituted this new format to discuss with the stakeholders that included local businesses, community leaders, parents, teachers, and the students. I was not sure where the panel discussion was going to go, but it turned out to be intense. I needed to discuss the responsibilities and the ownership of educating the children.
It was an emotional roller coaster, as each person (of about 15 participants) started to talk about their past, and how he or she ended up where they are now. The discussion spanned three generations -- their parents and their children. The parents had up to 5th grade education or less, except one who had a Bachelor's degree in Psychology.
Naseema (real names are being withheld for privacy) talked about her father. She got married and moved from their original residence in Dinajpur to Geneva Camp, where she is living for 7 years. She had this fond memories of their parents raising her and her 5 siblings; he tried his best to educate them. Her father ran a small general store, but that barely met their needs. Education was an additional expense they could not afford. She talked about her father who worked so hard and lovingly raised the family with the meager means, tears rolled down her eyes as she spoke. She stated in no uncertain words that she loved her parents, which was a little startling as open verbalization of such emotions is rare in the culture. She is definitely committed to educating her two children as she realized by experience the value of it.
The one with totally grey hair, Abid, runs a small grocery store at the corner of Geneva Camp. The business is not as brisk as he would like to have as the location is a little away from the main market. During Ramadan the business has slowed down anyhow. His father was a skilled laborer in Nawabpur, near the center city. He had good income, but then he died, leaving the family without any income. He was the eldest so the responsibility of raising his 3 brothers and 2 sisters essentially fell on his shoulders. Then he got married and had several children. He worked hard all his life and now he has problems with his hands and the manual work has become very difficult. He was very sad that his children are all married, gone their own ways, and do not care about him. They don’t even check if their father has proper food to eat, he lamented.
The discussion on who is responsible for educating their children was illuminating. When I asked if Mr. Abid’s sons are not taking care of their own father, why someone from all the way from the USA should come in and take the responsibility of teaching their kids. I kept the argument simple, not discussing that there are other compelling reasons for us and the world to get involved. Finally it was settled that they are solely responsible for educating their children, and they welcome that we are there to help them in this pursuit. That has always been DoPeace’s position, and we keep articulating this on every occasion.
The community's contribution to educating their children, however, remained unresolved. .org

Photos from DoPeace.org-Al-Falah Mohammadpur's post 13/07/2017

My 7th Visit to Bangladesh
Education in the Slums
Post 2: Opportunity for Whom?

After our meeting with Al-Falah teachers and management, we started heading back through the meandering narrow streets of Geneva Camp. If you walk the streets for the first time, i promise it will be an unforgettable experience, reminiscent of a dilapidated world you may have seen in movies with piles of dirt, unbearable stench, open sewage next to the walkways, and overcrowded one room residences.

As I followed the staff, negotiating the muddy lane after the heavy rain, I saw a half-naked boy about four years old, standing on the doorway to his house. I paused for a moment and looked at him, our eyes locked for a moment. My mind jumped back when I was a kid of the same age in the same city.

If you take back the intervening time, I find very little difference between the two kids. I was not a gifted child by any stretch of imagination. The brain capability is definitely the same. It is a luck of the draw that dictated the difference. I cannot explain why I am not there in place of that kid.

Now let’s say a philanthropist shows up in the slum at the moment from the USA and decides that he would provide for food and the basic necessities for the child. Will it change anything for the child, besides being well fed and better clothed? The answer is No, as the destiny of the child will still not change much.

The child is still not provided something call the Opportunity - the opportunity to shape his life - while the visitor had this opportunity in the past. The difference is the opportunity of education.

There is no conceivable reason that, given the opportunity, this kid will not be able to complete, say, his engineering degree, find ways to get his Ph.D., and earn to have a respectable life. It is already done. I am there as a proof. The two from the same city.

May be this child could grow up to be a better philanthropist than I can ever be. Maybe he will educate thousands of children in the slums of the world. May be he will make the world a better place to live than I can imagine.

By providing the opportunity of education to this child, are we doing a favor to the child or are we creating opportunity for ourselves? Our future generations may live a better life because this child gets the education.
As I walked away from the child, I just wished that there will be a school for him to go to when he is of the age. I wish he will have the opportunity to rise up and save the world!

21/06/2017

My 7th Visit to Bangladesh
Education in the Slums
Post 6: A debate with the stakeholders


The room was packed with the parents, slum community leader, several key individuals of the camp, some of the invited teachers, and our Partner NGO. The words were already out and the concern of the community was high that DoPeace was thinking about changing the rules of engagement. The concern was valid. I was on the front line ready to make my argument.

It was not antagonistic, as we have developed some trust in the community over the last two years. We are serving over 1200 children in that community. A civic dialog was brewing, and I was there to defend my position.

As each one was introduced, they also started to put their questions out front. Are you now going to charge tuition for the services? Other schools provide not only free education, but they also provide uniforms and food. We are here because we can’t afford to go to proper schools, and this is convenient. We cannot find schools as they have very limited enrollment. Do you understand that we are poor people and we struggle to make our ends meet? We appreciate what you are doing, but you are now disengaging yourself from us. Why can’t you continue the way it is going, as we are very happy the way it is?

I listened to them intently, trying very hard to understand what they are really saying. I collected the questions in my mind, nodding all the time and responding intermittently just to clarify their questions. The community leader, with whom I have a good rapport, tried to intervene occasionally to blunt the sharp questions by sugarcoating the points being made, but I gently asked him to back off. My NGOs were sitting over next to me and wondering what is going to happen.

This is not the first time, I had engaged the slum community in civic dialog. I did it twice this week before I ended up with this community.

I started talking to them, and there was a pin drop silence.

My Board of Directors (I used much simpler language and not the lingo) wants to know if the community really wants to educate their children?

A silly question, perhaps. Of course, they want their children to get educated. Why else are they there?

My Board of Directors wants the proof, I emphasized. I pointed out that there were three nonprofit organizations before, some of them quite flush with money. They had schools in the community, and they are all long gone. So, eventually, we will go away as well.

They looked at me, bewildered. Why would you go away and betray us, like others, the mother of a student asked?

Let me tell you a simple reason, I said. If I am dead today, this enterprise is going end. But there could be other reasons.

They were aghast and there were sympathetic murmurs in the room. We want a long-life for you, someone said loudly, and there was resounding agreement. (secretly, I was relieved)

I laughed. I do not have any plans to die that quickly, I said, but I am trying to make a point, as anything can happen and it is a risky position to depend on me on or any other organization 100%.

You have to be a partner in this endeavor and make sure that the schools continue in perpetuity, I said. You are solely responsible for educating your children, and for the last 40 years you have not taken any steps whatsoever, I was a little dramatic. You have been walking around these neighborhoods for years, you see the children on the streets, and you never got together to seriously plan for their education on your own.

But we do not have any money for that, said one woman.

In this community of 15,000 people, I am sure that many of them can contribute one Taka per month towards the community fund for education, I replied. Has any of you contributed one Taka in the last 40 years for education? I raised my voice a little, looking at the leader and the two businessmen sitting there. There was silence.

That shows that you have no concerns about educating your children, and I cannot provide any proof to my Board of Directors to continue helping you, I was a little combative.

I want you to be engaged and stop asking for free stuff. I want a partnership. I want joint venture. I kept going.

I saw them getting my point. I saw some of them relenting.

19/06/2017

My 7th Visit to Bangladesh
Education in the Slums
Post 4: The cultural gap


As I discussed with the full house of 16 teachers from our NGO named EKOK, who is serving more than 1600 students in the 8 DoPeace learning centers in Mirpur, Dhaka, we stumbled into a topic that I have only discussed in passing in the past - the importance of education across the diversity of various ethnic groups.

Many of our learning centers are located among very poor Urdu-peaking Bihari population. The question of performance and attendance, which are our central theme of the outcome we closely monitor, hovered around a trend of students missing classes during their observance of festivities. The students have a tendency, with blessing from their parents, to miss the day before, on the day, and the day after the festivals. We are talking about the festivals that are not national holidays, or the holidays that our schools allows.


The issue may appear to be minor, but it cuts deep into the priority. Our teachers have approached the parents frequently to not allow the students to be absent, and have them attend the festivities after the class time, as most activities take place in the evenings anyhow.


This simply alludes to the complacency to education that frustrates us. Routinely missing classes leave the students behind, thus the teachers are unable to attain the target they are required to meet.

Teaching the community to become serious about educating their children has become the central issue in some of our DoPeace learning centers, and we are scrambling to find an acceptable solution.

18/06/2017

My 7th Visit to Bangladesh
Education in the Slums
Post 3: The haunting past

I was at the Panel Discussion at Al-Falah in the Geneva Camp in Mohammadpur and at PBUS in Mirpur, both located in Dhaka. We have instituted this new format to discuss with the stakeholders that included local businesses, community leaders, parents, teachers, and the students. I was not sure where the panel discussion was going to go, but it turned out to be intense. I needed to discuss the responsibilities and the ownership of educating the children.

It turned out to be an emotional roller coaster, as each person of about 15 participants started to talk about their past, and how he or she ended up where they are now. The discussion spanned three generations -- their parents and their children. The parents had up to 5th grade education or less, except one who had a Bachelor's degree in Psychology.

Naseema (real names are being withheld for privacy) talked about her father. She got married and moved from their original residence in Dinajpur to Geneva Camp, where she is living for 7 years. She had this fond memories of their parents raising her and her 5 siblings; he tried his best to educate them. Her father ran a small general store, but that barely met their needs. Education was an additional expense they could not afford. She talked about her father who worked so hard and lovingly raised the family with the meager means, tears rolling down her eyes as she spoke. She stated in no uncertain words that she loved her parents, which was a little startling as open verbalization of such emotions is rare in the culture. She is definitely committed to educating her two children as she realized by experience the value of it.

The one with totally grey hair, Abid, runs a small grocery store at the corner of Geneva Camp. The business is not as brisk as he would like to have as the location is a little away from the main market. During Ramadan the business has slowed down anyhow. His father was a skilled laborer in Nawabpur, near the center city. He had good income, but then he died, leaving the family without any income. He was the eldest so the responsibility of raising his 3 brothers and 2 sisters essentially fell on his shoulders. Then he got married and had several children. He worked hard all his life and now he has problems with his hands and the manual work has become very difficult. He was very sad that his children are all married, gone their own ways, and do not care about him. They don’t even check if their father has proper food to eat, he lamented.

The discussion on who is responsible for educating their children was illuminating. When I asked if Mr. Abid’s sons are not taking care of their own father, why someone from all the way from the USA should come in and take the responsibility of teaching their kids. I kept the argument simple, not discussing that there are other compelling reasons for us and the world to get involved. Finally it was settled that they are solely responsible for educating their children, and they welcome that we are there to help them in this pursuit. That has always been DoPeace’s position, and we keep articulating this on every occasion.

The community's contribution to educating their children, however, remained unresolved. .org

17/06/2017

My 7th Visit to Bangladesh
Education in the Slums
Post 2: Opportunity for Whom?


After our meeting with the meeting with Al-Falah teachers and management, we started heading back through the meandering narrow streets of Geneva Camp. If you walk the streets for the first time, i promise it will be an unforgettable experience, reminiscent of a dilapidated world you may have seen in movies with piles of dirt, unbearable stench, open sewage next to the walkways, and overcrowded one room residences.


As I followed the staff, negotiating the muddy lane after the heavy rain, I saw a half-naked boy about four years old, standing on the doorway to his house. I paused for a moment and looked at him, our eyes locked for a moment. My mind jumped back when I was a kid of the same age in the same city.


If you take back the intervening time, I find very little difference between the two kids. I was not a gifted child by any stretch of imagination. The brain capability is definitely the same. It is a luck of the draw that dictated the difference. I cannot explain why I am not there in place of that kid.


Now let’s say a low-level philanthropist shows up in the slum at the moment from the USA (via resting in a 5-star hotel in Doha) and decides that he would provide for food and basic necessities for the child. Will it change anything for the child, besides being well fed and better clothed? The answer is No, as the destiny of the child will still not change much.


The child is still not provided something call the Opportunity - the opportunity to shape his life. While the visitor had this opportunity in the past. The difference is the opportunity of education.


There is no conceivable reason that, given the opportunity, this kid will not be able to complete, say, his engineering degree, find ways to get his Ph.D., and earn to have a respectable life. It is already done. I am there as a proof. The two from the same city.


May be this child could grow up to be a better philanthropist than I can ever be. Maybe he will educate thousands of children in the slums of the world. May be he will make the world a better place to live than I can imagine.


By providing the opportunity of education to this child, are we doing a favor to the child or are we creating opportunity for ourselves? Our future generations may live a better life because this child gets the education.

As I walked away from the child, I just wished that there will be a school for him to go to when he is of the age. I wish he will have the opportunity to rise up and save the world!

16/06/2017

My 7th Visit to Bangladesh
Education in the Slums
Post 1: Long-term strategy


I should first talk about my long journey from Philadelphia to Dhaka - 24 hours door to door. Although I have done it several times, it has never gotten easier for me. At the expense of showing my vulnerability, I must admit that this is the most dreadful part of my trip. But I am glad that I have made it. Now my journey begins to oversee our seven local NGOs in Dhaka, Chittagong, Saidpur, and Rangpur, along with the 48 Learning Centers with more than 10,000 students.


I started this enterprise of bringing poor slum children from the streets to the one-room classrooms starting in 2014, not knowing what I am getting into. With some IT background, and experience in running post-secondary school called PITC Institute in Wyncote, PA, I was convinced that technology will solve the educational problem for the slum kids. I wanted them to leapfrog into the 21st century by making the resource available over the Internet.


I created online courses geared for the 5th grade curriculum in Bangladesh and made it available from my server in Pennsylvania. In 2014 I brought in 15 Chromebooks, set up the classrooms in Rangpur, Bangladesh, and trained my teachers to access and teach the courses using Moodle learning platform.

Alas, I quickly learned that it was an exercise in futility, for many reasons. I totally did not get it at the time. I will not go into the details of why that did not fly at this time, in the interest of not making this blog too long.


After many iterations of different approaches, I concluded that we need to be in the middle of the slum community, not on the outskirts of it, where the children below six years old will have difficulty reaching. I wanted to be one of them, and operate in the environment of their familiarity, so they are comfortable in going to these one-room classrooms.


The environment of the slums is difficult to comprehend, if you have not seen them, and particularly if you live in the USA or in any of the European countries. However, there are millions of small children who are extremely vulnerable, and they are the product of generations of neglect. Their forefathers have been unable to break the cycle of poverty and lack of education. Without education, the next generation of millions of children are going to be left behind as well, and the nightmare of extreme poverty will continue for us. Leaving millions of children behind has consequences, we as human beings cannot simply put the severe problem under the rug and hope that the problem will go away. We have paid the consequences of leaving the children behind, and it will escalate with geometric progressions if we do not do anything about it.


We need to have a long-term humane strategy and chip in the problem for the well-being of the mankind and for the peaceful co-existence that we so much desire.

Timeline photos 11/06/2017

Vision can be a reality


When you look at the poor children in the slums, it is hard to imagine that they can have believable lofty goals. Illiteracy is rampant and most of them will not come across strong role models. They will generally not encounter successful people as a source of motivation.


Yet, imagination is what propels us. The vision of what we could be is a force that conquers obstacles. The vision is something each child needs to have. The vision should be written, and it should be internalized by repeating them. The vision should be burned in the brain, until it appears plausible. It should be talked about often until they start believing in it. The vision should give the children the direction to move forward. In fact the vision becomes the implicit central focus of children's family, so the family starts believing in the child.


This kind of implicit vision routinely exists within the educated families. Children of educated parents are more likely to inherit the vision of becoming educated.


We have created the cards with vision for more than 10,000 small children going to DoPeace.org schools in the slums of Bangladesh. Children are required to carry these cards when they come to the classrooms. The teachers will read and clarify the meaning to the children.


Einstein believed that imagination was more important than knowledge. We will settle for imagination as well, particularly when it will ignite the desire for knowledge.

Timeline photos 24/05/2017

How would DoPeace.org survive?

There is no guarantee that DoPeace.org will survive for ever. In fact, it is quite certain that it will not. What will happen when we fold?

The answer is that DoPeace.org survives if the mission is kept alive. That is, if the 10,000 or more (if, and when, we expand even more-and that is the objective) little children are educated every year for, say, next 20 years. The only way this can happen is when we make the communities self-sufficient, and not rely on handouts. The communities should educate their own children. The objective of DoPeace.org is to show the way, so they are trained to be on their own.

It might occur that this objective is in conflict with the partner NGOs, but, in the long-run, it is not. It is like a doctor who is not in conflict with his or her business objectives by curing the patients, as the pool of patients will always be sufficient, against all wishes to eradicate all the diseases. Similarly, our partner NGOs (currently seven of them) will attracts more projects for the communities, as they achieve startling success on the DoPeace.org projects.

DoPeace.org model for the education of the slum children is designed to be low-cost and robust and works closely with the communities. However, educating them to take the ownership of educating their children is a daunting task, and requires hard work. But I am confident that we will be able to get the message through.

It is not as much the survival of DoPeace.org that is at stake, but the survival of our mission. We are determined to change the world, one disadvantaged child at a time.

And we have tens of thousands of you who have responded in support of the mission.

Photos from DoPeace.org-Al-Falah Mohammadpur's post 10/01/2017

Al-Falah Bangladesh has organized Annual sports event 2017, which is
by: Dr. SONYA S.NOOR, USA,
Pre-school and coaching student are participate in several indoor games like chocolate graving, marble balance, musical chair. All the students & our Teachers, staff of Al-Falah Bangladesh passing a wonderful moment.
Thanks to Feroz Shaikh also that he help us to do the event nicely.

Photos from DoPeace.org-Al-Falah Mohammadpur's post 02/01/2017

Al-Falah Bangladesh under it's education program continuing pre-school and specialized coaching classes for the children of Geneva Camp and Market Camp. A total of 9 shifts of pre-school and 6 shifts of specialized coaching classes conducted in 2016.
Students at the age of 4-5 years old attended pre-school classes. After one year of their class they attended a final test and today is their Pre-School Graduation Ceremony.
Al-Falah Bangladesh has invited Ms. Headmistress of Ideal Govt. Primary School and Ms., Teacher at the same school were our guests and distributed result card among the children.
Earlier the guests were met the parents of the students so that they convey messages on norms and condition for admission and attend classes as the students mostly will get admission in the Govt. primary school.
Future generation is growing up and they need attention and care for their brought up.

Photos from DoPeace.org-Al-Falah Mohammadpur's post 29/12/2016

Pre-School is an exceptional opportunity for the camp dwellers kids to learn alphabets, play with the other class mates and finally they accommodated themselves with the school environment. After a year of their learning they attended a final exam where the teacher assessed their learning skills.
Then the teacher prepare a result and today we have awarded the pre-school graduation with a result card to the students.
The beauty of the school is all are same and we don't discriminated among the children saying 1st, 2nd , 3rd.
Hope this will a glorifying days for the children with the result card.
Wishes a brights future for all of them.

Photos from DoPeace.org-Al-Falah Mohammadpur's post 28/12/2016

After windup of annual exam PCCI has organized indoor games for the pre-school and specialized coaching student at Geneva Camp campus. Dr. Sonya S.Noor, cardiovascular surgeon from USA was very kind to sponsor after play refreshment. This is 3rd day of sports day

18/12/2016

My 6th Visit to Bangladesh
Education in the Slums
Post 2: The Government School Principal Speaks

DoPeace Learning Centers are the holding places for the children in the slums. They are not schools. We take the little children in the streets and bring them into the a one-room classrooms right in the middle of the slum community. They are the preschool children. We teach them the habits of going to school. They are required to show up on time, have clean clothes, and behave well with the teachers and the peers -- these characteristics, we determine, are more important than the learning itself. These habits will pave the way to their long-term success.
Children in the slums have the appearance and mannerism, by virtue of their unfortunate circumstances, that is a roadblock to the education.

These facts were starkly delivered to me by the Principal of Government Ideal Primary School, Ms. Shuli Shabna Bano, when we met her yesterday. This school has about 700 students Grades 1 - 5, at the outskirts of Geneva Camp, a sum consisting of about 40,000 residence, where we have three Learning Centers, educating 690 slum children.

After graduation, our preschool children are admitted to the primary schools, like the Government Ideal Primary School we visited.

The interesting part of this school is that their students population consists of 80% from Geneva Camp. It is a de facto Government school for the slum children because of its proximity to the slum. So, the burning question I had was how our DoPeace graduated children have fared in this school. We had about 25 children admitted to this school in 2015.

Ms. Bano could not answer this specific question, as she does not know of the individual children, but what she said was instructive, although not unexpected. The children from the slum has the assimilation problem. They do not speak the native language, Bangla, very well. Their appearance is shabby, and they are somewhat combative (also, some of the parents are unable to walk their children to school and let them walk alone to and back to school). Because of this, sometimes the parents living outside the slums are reluctant to send their children here.

The result is that this contributes to the isolation of the children in the slums.
We then met with our Management Committee of the DoPeace Learning Center at Market Camp and discussed the issues brought about by the school principal. The facts corroborated with what Ms. Bano indicated, including the that the children are unable to speak Bangla well, the native language.

We neglect the fact that a child has an amazing ability to be bilingual, if we allow such an opportunity.

Utmost emphasis should be placed to assimilate the children in the slums with the mainstream language and culture, if we want the progress that we are looking for.

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Videos (show all)

Management Committee Meeting at Dr. Naheed Ahmed Learning Cent...
A Visit to a Child's home at Geneva Camp, Dhaka (June 2016)
MD Izhar Learning Center in Geneva Camp, Dhaka
A visit to Dr Naheed Ahmed Learning Center June 2016
Here is the clip of my visit to a preschool child's home at Sa...
Benjamin Franklin Learning Center Management Committee Standin...
A visit to Laique Azam Learning Center, Saidpur, Bangladesh

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A non official forum page of the Shaheens, Present & Ex. Share your thoughts, reach each other !

উদ্ভাস - Udvash Academic & Admission Care উদ্ভাস - Udvash Academic & Admission Care
78, Green Road (3rd Floor), Farmgate
Dhaka, 1205

Welcome to the official page of Udvash Academic & Admission Care

Dhaka City College Dhaka City College
R#02, Near Science Labrotary, Dhanmondi
Dhaka, 1205

A Centre of Excellence