Frenalytics - brain App

Frenalytics - brain App

Our app helps people with cognitive brain problems feel better!

02/05/2022

Symptoms of frontotemporal dementia

Signs and symptoms of frontotemporal dementia can be different from one individual to the next. Signs and symptoms get progressively worse over time, usually over years.

Behavioral changes
The most common signs of frontotemporal dementia involve extreme changes in behavior and personality. These include: increasingly inappropriate social behavior; loss of empathy; lack of judgment; loss of inhibition; lack of interest (apathy); repetitive compulsive behavior (tapping, clapping,smacking lips); a decline in personal hygiene; changes in eating habits; compulsively wanting to put things in the mouth.
Speech and language problems
Some subtypes of frontotemporal dementia lead to language problems or impairment or loss of speech: increasing difficulty in using and understanding written and spoken language; trouble naming things; no longer knowing word meanings; having hesitant speech that may sound telegraphic; making mistakes in sentence construction.
Motor disorders
Rarer subtypes of frontotemporal dementia are characterized by problems with movement similar to those associated with Parkinson's disease or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS): tremor, rigidity, muscle spasms or twitches, poor coordination, difficulty swallowing, muscle weakness, inappropriate laughing or crying, falls or walking problems.

02/05/2022

What Are the Three Levels of Autism?

ASD Level 1: Requiring Support
Level 1 is the mildest, or “highest functioning” form of autism, which includes those who would have previously been diagnosed with Asperger’s syndrome. Individuals with ASD level 1 may have difficulty understanding social cues and may struggle to form and maintain personal relationships. A child with level 1 autism may understand and speak in complete sentences, but have difficulty engaging in back-and-forth conversation.
ASD Level 2: Requiring Substantial Support
Children on this level have challenges in verbal and nonverbal communication, as well as reduced or abnormal responses to social cues.Inflexibility of behavior is also more pronounced than in ASD level 1. Repetitive behaviors appear more frequently and may be obvious to casual observers. Likewise, children with level 2 autism may have difficulty coping with changes in routine, which can cause challenging behavior.
ASD Level 3: Requiring Very Substantial Support
ASD level 3 is characterized by severe challenges in social communication as well as extremely inflexible behavior. Children with level 3 autism will be nonverbal or have the use of only a few words of intelligible speech. Initiation of social interaction is very limited, as well as response to others. An individual at this level may interact with others abnormally, and only to meet immediate needs.At this level, restrictive or repetitive behaviors interfere with the individual’s ability to function. Changing focus from one activity to another may come at great difficulty and cause significant distress.

18/04/2022

Brain Exercises and Dementia
Can you help your brain stay healthy as you age by doing things that challenge your mind? Could that also help you avoid memory loss, or even prevent or delay dementia such as Alzheimer's?
Scientists need to do more research to find out for sure. But a number of studies show there are benefits to staying mentally active.
What kinds of brain exercises should I do?
That may be vary from person to person. But the main idea seems to be keeping your brain active and challenged. You could start with something as simple as eating with the hand you usually don’t use from time to time.
You can also:
Learn something new, such as a second language or a musical instrument.
Play board games with your kids or grandkids. Or get your friends together for a weekly game of cards. Mix it up by trying new games.
Work on crossword, number, or other kinds of puzzles.
Play online memory games or video games.
Read, write, or sign up for local adult education classes.
How does brain activity help?
Studies of animals show that keeping the mind active may:
Reduce the amount of brain cell damage that happens with Alzheimer's
Support the growth of new nerve cells
Prompt nerve cells to send messages to each other
When you keep your brain active with exercises or other tasks, you may help build up a reserve supply of brain cells and links between them. Neither education nor brain exercises are a sure way to prevent Alzheimer's. But they may help delay symptoms and keep the mind working better for longer.

18/04/2022

What effects can be seen with a stroke in the cerebrum?
The cerebrum is the part of the brain that occupies the top and front portions of the skull. It controls movement and sensation, speech, thinking, reasoning, memory, vision, and emotions. The cerebrum is divided into the right and left sides, or hemispheres.
Depending on the area and side of the cerebrum affected by the stroke, any, or all, of these functions may be impaired:
Movement and sensation
Speech and language
Eating and swallowing
Vision
Cognitive (thinking, reasoning, judgment, and memory) ability
Perception and orientation to surroundings
Self-care ability
Bowel and bladder control
Emotional control
Sexual ability
In addition to these general effects, some specific impairments may occur when a particular area of the cerebrum is damaged.
The effects of a right hemisphere stroke may include:
Left-sided weakness or paralysis and sensory impairment
Denial of paralysis or impairment and reduced insight into the problems created by the stroke (this is called "left neglect")
Visual problems, including an inability to see the left visual field of each eye
Spatial problems with depth perception or directions, such as up or down and front or back
Inability to localize or recognize body parts
Inability to understand maps and find objects, such as clothing or toiletry items
Memory problems
Behavioral changes, such as lack of concern about situations, impulsivity, inappropriateness, and depression

The effects of a left hemisphere stroke may include:
Right-sided weakness or paralysis and sensory impairment
Problems with speech and understanding language (aphasia)
Visual problems, including the inability to see the right visual field of each eye
Impaired ability to do math or to organize, reason, and analyze items
Behavioral changes, such as depression, cautiousness, and hesitancy
Impaired ability to read, write, and learn new information
Memory problems

18/04/2022

5 Early Signs of Alzheimer’s Disease
Memory loss that affects daily life. You might forget about a scheduled Zoom meeting or search your memory for the name of someone you don’t know very well. An Alzheimer patient, however, will forget conversations or events and not remember them later.
Loss of problem-solving ability. While anyone might make a mistake in a mathematical calculation, people with Alzheimer’s may have trouble following recipes or forget how to do basic tasks they’ve been able to do in the past. They may forget how to play games they used to enjoy or get confused by multi-step instructions.
Confusion about times and places. People who are developing Alzheimer’s may forget their way home or get lost in familiar places. They may feel confused about the time of day and what’s appropriate for the time. They may choose clothing that is inappropriate for the weather.
Limitations with language. Someone with Alzheimer’s may lose track in the middle of a conversation, forget words, or have trouble putting sentences together. They may have trouble reading. It’s normal to have to search for words occasionally, but frequent difficulty with language can be a sign of dementia.
Personality changes. Some people show changes in personality when they have Alzheimer’s. They may withdraw from others when they used to be friendly, or become impulsive or irritable. Some Alzheimer’s patients become aggressive or begin wandering.
If you see these changes in a loved one — or in yourself — it’s time to talk with a doctor. Talk with your loved one about visiting a physician together. See your family doctor or internal medicine doctor and ask about dementia.

18/04/2022

5 Facts About Parkinson’s Disease
Here are some facts about Parkinson's disease that many people may not know.
1. Parkinson’s Disease Is Incurable
Although the disease is treatable, there is no cure. Current therapies can slow the progression of Parkinson's so that people with this condition can maintain a good quality of life.
2. Having Parkinson’s Is Not a Death Sentence
Parkinson’s disease is not fatal, and your life expectancy depends highly on the type of Parkinson's you have. If the type of disease isn't causing issues with brain function, you can potentially live as long as people without the disease.
3. The Disease Is Unique in Every Person
Although people with Parkinson’s disease share certain common symptoms such as tremors, loss of balance, and uncontrollable movements, not everyone will experience the disease the same way in terms of symptoms and disease severity.
4. There Are Some Subtle Early Warning Signs
Along with the early motor symptoms such as tremors and stiffness, other early warning signs of the disease can include the loss of smell and a soft voice. Small handwriting is also a telltale sign that someone may have Parkinson’s, especially if over time it continues to get smaller and more crowded.

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