Conflict reporting & Photojournalism

Conflict reporting & Photojournalism

Good journalism is difficult work at the best of time. this page helps to improve your skills and understand to face conflicts situations.

Good journalism is difficult work at the best of times. There is never
enough information and not enough time. Reporters rely on their training
and standards to overcome these difficulties and deliver news which is
accurate and impartial. That is the traditional role of journalism — to enable
the public to make well-informed decisions. However, when a society is threatened by violent conflict, jou

Picturing the Social: Militarism & Clean War 08/07/2015

WAM members may be interested in the following talks by Adi Kuntsman and Rhys Crilley from the Picturing the Social Conference (7th Nov 2014), now available on Soundcloud (other presentations also available). Abstracts for Kuntsman and Crilley below:

Picturing the Social: Militarism & Clean War WAM members may be interested in the following talks by Adi Kuntsman and Rhys Crilley from the Picturing the Social Conference (7th Nov 2014), now available on Soundcloud (other presentations also ...

Timeline photos 01/07/2015

For female photojournalists the past six weeks have been a particularly brutal reminder of the dangers they face. Two photographers have recently been killed while making a record of the suffering on humanity's most extreme edges, documenting the otherwise hidden effects of war on people left to endure tremendous hardship and pain.

German photographer Anja Niedringhaus was shot dead at a checkpoint in Afghanistan on 4 April by a man in police uniform, and just four weeks later, a young French photographer, Camille Lepage, died of gunshot wounds in the Central African Republic. The French government has said Lepage was deliberately targeted and murdered, although it remains unclear if this was at the hands of the Christian militias with whom she was travelling or whether, in fact, her death was an accident and she was caught in crossfire.

"This is a profession of the brave and the passionate, those committed to the mission of bringing to the world information that is fair, accurate and important," said Gary Pruitt, president of the Associated Press, after Niedringhaus's death. "Anja Niedringhaus met that definition in every way."

Alice Gabriner is a picture editor formerly at Time magazine and now at National Geographic, where about 12 of the 60 freelance photographers are women. The National Geographic Society has chosen to celebrate its 125th anniversary year by showing the work of 11 female photographers in an exhibition entitled Women of Vision (the exhibition runs all year in various venues across the US) because, says its vice-curator Kathryn Keane: "For the last decade some of our most powerful stories have been produced by a new generation of photojournalists who are women."

Gabriner has worked closely with the world's leading female photojournalists, from Lynsey Addario to Kitra Cahana and the responsibility that comes with commissioning people to travel to conflict zones is huge. "We do send these people into danger and of course I think about the risks," says Gabriner. "I'm always astonished by the bravery of these women. I'm getting calls all the time from people who just want a job, desperately want to go here or there and are willing to take the risks and so I'm happy to be able to get them doing a story they want to do. It's in retrospect, even years afterwards, you think about the risks. Photo editors are in a difficult position. Photography is a tough business and the turnover is so great, and people want to get into places that nobody else gets."

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