Save USyd Arts

Save USyd Arts

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We are organising a collective campaign of staff, students and community to fight the proposed cuts to the Arts and Humanities in the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences at the University of Sydney. #SaveUsydArts

12/10/2021

Alana Louise Bowden

January 29, 1986 – October 4, 2021

Aged 35

It is with broken hearts that we write of Alana Bowden’s passing.

Alana graduated with cross-disciplinary Honours in Theatre and Performance Studies and Studies in Religion in 2020, winning the University Medal with an outstandingly original thesis at the intersection of those two fields.

Alana was destined to become, in her own words, an “Academic-Witch” and an “interdisciplinary artist” discovering “the intersection between performance, gender, art and magic through embodied and collaborative experience.” Within these two departments she “had found a home – and perhaps more importantly, envisioned a future.”

Alana’s dream was seemingly ripped from her when University of Sydney management tried to axe both of her beloved departments in one foul, cost-cutting swoop at the beginning of 2021. As Alana articulated, “this visceral experience of devaluation and anxiety [for creatives within universities] is nothing new.”

Alana refused to accept the proposal, nor the erroneous fiscal logics underpinning it. In 2021, instead of commencing her PhD, she instigated this campaign to save her two beloved departments: Save USyd Arts.

It was within this context that we, students of the Save USyd Arts campaign, came to know the incredible force that is Alana Bowden.

Alana’s warmth lit up a room – or a Zoom – and inspired our hearts and minds to believe, to care and to act. Her heart and humanity came forth in every interaction, a testament to the power, energy, creativity, and light that drove her, and as a result drove all of us. She was the campaign’s brain, its vigour, its creativity, its persistence, and its power.

Because of Alana, and the staff and students she inspired into activity, the Save USyd Arts campaign successfully saved both of her two departments from being closed down.

This win was but a seed of what Alana could have won at the University and against slimy, corporate bastards everywhere in the years to come. She was a magical warrior, a no-bullsh*t bison ready to butt heads with management even when others felt powerless. That fearlessness will forever remain a lesson to us.

It is perhaps the greatest of all tragedies that after securing a future for Theatre and Performance Studies and Studies in Religion at the University, Alana was never able to begin her PhD, nor was she able to carve out the radical new niche in spiritual-performance academia for which she was destined. All of our minds and existences would have been richer for this.

Alana will forever be remembered. In every struggle against the dismal careerists, neoliberal hypocrites and corporate vandals who now perch like gargoyles atop the University of Sydney, Alana Bowden’s passion, politics and power will be reaffirmed. Alana will give us all strength and creativity as we fight for our education again, just as she did throughout 2021.

Alana was hungry to defeat the “Future FASS” restructure and course cuts in their entirety. We will continue this fight with her power within us.

Alana lives in all of us to whom she gave such light.

She is the spider on the wall.

She is punk.

She is loved and remembered by all of us.


Students of the Save USyd Arts campaign

16/09/2021

Win for the resistance today. Across the country we have faced cuts from every angle. The Liberal government, Vice Chancellors and Deans.

Dare to struggle and fight every cut- another university is possible!

Shout out to everyone who fought from day 1- staff who stood up, tore the bogus justification for these cuts to pieces and exposed the Arts faculty surplus. And to students who organised hundreds to oppose the cuts in petitions, marches and motions in lectures including passing a motion in the Deans own lecture.

Revolutionary organisation builds the power to win. Join Solidarity.

Save USyd Arts

https://honisoit.com/2021/09/theatre-and-religion-departments-saved-from-the-axe-but-threat-of-cuts-remain/?fbclid=IwAR1CJzmtV1k3lx6YLpbnIWLxqIXXrF1INR9TeaAVTcz90AqQ9cG3tAY2ZVI

16/09/2021

SAVE USYD ARTS WINS! THEATRE AND PERFORMANCE STUDIES, AND STUDIES IN RELIGION SAVED FROM AXE!

After seven long months of uncertainty, today we can finally announce that Theatre and Performance Studies, and Studies in Religion will not be cut at USyd.

Through sustained, collective, and creative pressure from staff and students, university management have stepped down from their plans to cut departments and jobs.

Thank you to every single person who got involved, shouted, signed, shared, or marched with us in solidarity. It is because of you and our collective power that we have won this victory. Amidst a global crisis in the arts and education sectors, we have not only shown university management that creative and cultural practice matters, but also how we can win the supposedly impossible fight when we come together.

Although we are celebrating the win today, the fight and campaign continues. There are still proposed cuts to courses, casual jobs and degrees ahead. We must carry the power and joy of this win as we continue to collectively fight for our jobs and education.

When we can dance again, we will no doubt celebrate as only artists can!

Much more to come. But for now, let’s dance…

x

08/09/2021

Wow. What a show of opposition in just 3 days by students to the Dean's Future FASS austerity cuts!!! Students oppose cuts to Theatre and Performance Studies and Studies of Religion which may entirely face the axe, and we oppose any cuts to staff or departments. Join us tomorrow at 2pm for NO FUTURE FASS - Open FASS Student Meeting to Question and Protest Dean Jagose. Please spread the word to friends and classmates! See you tomorrow!!

08/09/2021

On video... that "Girlboss" moment 🤣🤣🤣

We thought we might help Dean Jagose clear up her confusion about what a ‘Girlboss Feminist’ is - here’s a handy definition!

Girlboss: (pronounced /JAR-gose/ ) Someone who advocates equality for women while receiving a promotion to a near 7 figure salary from their continual commitment to cutting women's jobs, refusing their casual conversion, and axing entire departments.

Example in a sentence: “They want me to stop firing women? Well, they must not understand the complexities of the interpellative moment… for I am, in fact, a Girlboss.”

Real Feminist: Comes to the meeting with the Dean tomorrow at 2pm to oppose her cuts and support young casual worker women who may lose their jobs.

See the real feminists tomorrow -> https://fb.me/e/1IwdzxWek Spread the word!!

‘I’m not sure what girlboss feminism is’: Arts dean censured by students in her own lecture - Honi Soit 03/09/2021

“Students in the unit FASS2100, ‘Ideas and Movements that Changed the World’, today passed a motion opposing the Dean of the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (soon to be Deputy Vice-Chancellor) Annamarie Jagose’s ‘Future FASS’ austerity plan – right to her face.”

‘I’m not sure what girlboss feminism is’: Arts dean censured by students in her own lecture - Honi Soit Students in the unit FASS2100, ‘Ideas and Movements that Changed the World’, today passed a motion opposing the Dean of the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (soon to be Deputy Vice-Chancellor) Annamarie Jagose’s ‘Future FASS’ austerity plan – right to her face. The ‘Future FASS’ p...

12/07/2021

From University of Sydney Theatre & Performance Studies

Thanks to FORM Dance Projects and Rex resident artist, the eminent Vicki Van Hout! It is always great to hear how much our small department impacts our students, friends, and community, and Vicki writes eloquently here on the value of creative endeavour.

“As an Indigenous independent dance practitioner I have enjoyed three (or more, I can’t quite recall) residencies at the Rex Cramphorn Studio attached to the Department, which opened its doors in 1994. Dance is one of the most valuable forms of Aboriginal cultural transmission. Those residencies meant that I was able to practise and research the ways we as urban Aboriginal people are affirming our identity in the theatrical spaces, and therefore perpetuating culture just like our ‘traditional’ counterparts do ‘on country’. Developments of a work about Wiradjuri kinship and a work about the experiences of Aboriginal fringe dwellers living rough in the ‘top end’ in and around Darwin were realised in that studio, providing creative material to initiate critical discourse around the Indigenous lived experience.”

July's monthly blog is OUT NOW!
Save the Theatre and Performance Studies Department!

"Nobody will be singing Eddie Money's Take Me Home Tonight because nobody will be taking anybody anywhere. A boogie in pubs is out and the dance floor at weddings has been deemed a precarious on again off again zone yet again. Not to mention getting a leg over a barre is strictly verboten in hundreds of the inner and outer suburban dance studios of many great Australian towns and cities, with doors uniformly closed until further notice." - Vicki Van Hout

Read about Sydney arts in lockdown and saving and the Department of Theatre and Performance Studies at the University of Sydney.

Vicki Van Hout's blog HERE - https://www.form.org.au/save-the-theatre-and-performance-studies-department/

Photos from Save USyd Arts's post 05/07/2021

NTEU RESPONSE TO THE PROPOSED CUTS TO THE ARTS AND HUMANITIES AT USYD

“We have no confidence in the process headed by the Dean and call on her to withdraw the cost cutting exercise and desist from making staff complicit in damaging their own faculty by participating in these unfounded and unnecessary consultations.”

(Photo credit: Daniel Towers)

READ THE FULL RESPONSE BELOW

“Enough is enough!

The NTEU’s response to the proposed cuts in FASS

The following points were endorsed as a collective submission by a meeting of NTEU members in FASS on June 30.

1.1 We reject the financial rationale for any cuts whatsoever to either staffing or curriculum. The case for urgent Faculty cost reductions has not yet been made. With the university sector in a state of flux, future reductions in international fee income remain speculative. We do not deny that reductions are possible, but they are only possibilities. Our Faculty should not be singled out as the target of a hasty, pre-emptive response to contingencies that remain uncertain.

1.2 The story we have been told is that across the university as a whole, (1) ‘growth neutral’ cost per student has been rising faster than average fee growth, (2) student load growth has countered this ‘margin compression’, but (3) we are due to reach the limits of load growth in the next few years, and when we do, this will begin to eat into the university’s operating margin.

1.3 Every step of this argument involves a complex set of factors, some subject to considerable uncertainty. Even taking the management story at face value, the urgency of the restructuring process is far out of line with the numbers we have seen. The $3.6m cost base reduction figure is entirely arbitrary- and a small fraction of the $36.9m combined discretionary operating surplus (after central cost allocation) across all schools in the Faculty last year, despite all the disruption of COVID. This year, that combined surplus is projected to balloon to $67.9m. (Data from Dean’s slides at Faculty meeting, 27 May.) In this context, it is misleading and arbitrary to focus on particular department and school-level deficits. Economies of scale in teaching mean that some parts of the university cross-subsidise others—this has long been standard operating procedure.

1.4 Meanwhile, for the institution as a whole, numbers are looking very healthy. As reported in its Annual Report, the university recorded an incredible $106.6m operating surplus for 2020—a far cry from the massive deficit projected a year ago. This surplus was reported in line with Australian accounting standards. The subsequent presentation of this as a $2.2m deficit by management is not based on a recognised accounting standard. This 'deficit' has been artificially created by selectively excluding tied grant funds on the revenue side without also excluding the activities they are funding on the expenditure side. The real surplus was confirmed by the NSW Auditor General's report on the annual audit of universities. Enrolment and revenue for 2021 has so far wildly exceeded the projections management presented during the voluntary redundancy change process in September. Then, EFTSL was projected to be 54,646, and student revenue $1.798 billion. After census date, the 2021 projections were revised to more than 60,000 EFTSL and student revenue above $2 billion (Briefing from Stephen Garton and Wayne Andrews, 26 April). These numbers exceed even the pre-COVID long-term budget projections for 2021 made in 2019.

1.5 The urgency with which the Dean is pursuing cost savings is utterly out of line with the current financial situation of the Faculty or University, and with management’s own account of the time scale over which the ‘margin compression’ will bite.

2.1 Discussion should not take place without full disclosure of the data and modelling behind management projections. We had expected Faculty management to provide staff a detailed case for the cost reductions, and the financial information that would allow for an informed discussion. So far nothing has been provided, beyond the scraps on slides at the 27 May Faculty meeting.

2.2 We have also asked for the modelling behind management’s projections of cost and revenue growth. To have an informed discussion of alternative ways of dealing with the institution’s financial future, we need to know what the variables are, and what might affect them – both things in our control and beyond our control.

2.3 If management is confident in its projections, there should be no problem releasing the data and modelling and allowing staff to see where the analysis comes from. Contextless factoids cherry-picked for PowerPoint slides give no basis for confidence, and no material for serious collegial discussions. How are we supposed to come to conclusions about alternative measures when we have no basis for projecting their financial impact?

3. The diversity and breadth of our staff and curriculum is our faculty’s major strength and must be preserved. As NTEU members have repeatedly argued, in the event of serious fee-income shortfalls in the future, the appropriate reaction will be to run deficits until such time as income flows are restored,
or less panicked and more systemic, whole-of-university responses can be planned. Management has sometimes argued against deficits on the grounds that they constitute ‘intergenerational inequity’. This argument ignores the very serious inequity created by lastingly undermining the strength of our faculty and cutting the educational opportunities open to current and future generations of students – opportunities that they have repeatedly shown they value.

4.1 We object in the strongest possible terms to the ‘consultation’ process. Since the cuts were first mooted, every stage of the process has been marked by unacceptable disrespect for staff. First, faculty members learned that two departments were being considered for closure, and that one entire school was to be dissolved. Subsequently, the Dean suggested that these outcomes were only possibilities, but has maintained a complete ambiguity about her own intentions and preferences. The value of consultation has also been undermined by the Dean’s repeated assertion of her own executive authority as the final decision-maker, even after a full faculty meeting clearly registered faculty members’ desire to determine any savings measures through a democratic vote.

4.2 In addition to disrespect, ambiguity surrounds almost every phase of the process: having initially stated that a formal change proposal was very likely to be required, the Dean is now presenting it only as a possibility; when savings of roughly $10m were initially demanded, that figure has now been drastically revised downwards, but with no justification given for why FASS is still subject to greater cuts than any other area of the university which we know.

4.3 The relation between the faculty’s current finances and the desired savings has been entirely unclear, with faculty members frequently having the impression that balance sheets have been
weaponized against them. The threat of job-losses has placed members of the departments and schools in question, and beyond, in a state of prolonged uncertainty and anxiety. To remedy this, the Dean must make an immediate commitment to job-security in the faculty, including to ongoing and more secure work for casualised colleagues, and to the maintenance of honorary associates. ‘Consultation’ has been entirely on the Dean’s terms, with faculty members given almost no opportunity to determine its forms, and invited to participate in collective discussions on highly general questions, with no clarity whatsoever on how or whether their opinions will be taken into account.

5. We insist the university leadership adopt a serious response to the refusal of federal support. If university management had been half as active as the NTEU in assertively campaigning for adequate government funding for higher education, we could now be in a very different position. The immediate priority for university management should be to harness the significant social capital of the institution in order to mount a serious, public campaign for increased public support. The NTEU will be campaigning nationally and locally on the issue as a matter of principle. Management should get on board.

6. We have no confidence in the process headed by the Dean and call on her to withdraw the cost cutting exercise and desist from making staff complicit in damaging their own faculty by participating in these unfounded and unnecessary consultations. Professor Jagose has gratuitously sprung substantial and job-threatening changes on a Faculty that is still trying to recover from the voluntary redundancy process, and that has been destabilized by a series of often botched organisational changes. A major restructure to our work and our students’ education should be the result of serious and prolonged deliberation. Instead, it is being rushed through at breakneck speed, directly obstructing the teaching, research and administrative work we have to do. In light of this and of the other points in this submission, we believe that the Dean’s management of the faculty has been highly chaotic, disingenuous, unfair and unreasonable.

7. We call on all colleagues to join the NTEU. The Dean’s determination to manage the faculty through austerity has highlighted the need for genuine collegial and democratic governance in the university. The NTEU is the only fully democratic body on campus able to influence the institution’s direction. We call on all colleagues to join us: nteu.org.au/

Save the Arts at the University of Sydney: An open letter to the Vice Chancellor and University Executive from members of the Australian arts community and supporters of the arts 01/07/2021

A HUGE THANK YOU TO THE ARTS COMMUNITY OF AUSTRALIA! NEARLY 1'000 NAMES!

WE LOVE YOU!

Please sign and share!

tinyurl.com/savetheartsusyd

Save the Arts at the University of Sydney: An open letter to the Vice Chancellor and University Executive from members of the Australian arts community and supporters of the arts This action was initiated on the land of the Gadigal people of the Eora Nation, on whose land the University of Sydney also sits, and is endorsed by supporters located on the unceded lands of displaced peoples around Australia and the world. We are joined in solidarity with those whose sovereignty w...

30/06/2021

If you haven't done so already... please SIGN THE OPEN LETTER TO OBJECT TO THE CLOSURE OF THEATRE & PERFORMANCE STUDIES!

Add your name as a supporter of the arts to the growing list of artists, academics and arts lovers!

tinyurl.com/savetheartsusyd

Save Studies in Religion at the University of Sydney: An open letter to the Vice Chancellor and University Executive from supporters of the critical academic study of religion 30/06/2021

Have you signed the open letter to save Studies in Religion at USyd?

Sign it, Share it, Shout it!

tinyurl.com/saveusydreligiousstudies

Save Studies in Religion at the University of Sydney: An open letter to the Vice Chancellor and University Executive from supporters of the critical academic study of religion This action was initiated on the land of the Gadigal people of the Eora Nation, on whose land the University of Sydney also sits, and is endorsed by supporters located on the unceded lands of displaced peoples around Australia and the world. We are joined in solidarity with those whose sovereignty w...

25/06/2021

FROM THE USYD FASS NTEU National Tertiary Education Union

"FASS cuts: no details, no justification, no way!

FASS is the only area of the university we know of which is being subjected to cuts of the magnitude the Dean has foreshadowed. Why? The Dean presents the need to reduce the faculty’s cost-base as an unwelcome requirement to be imposed on us from above. Has Annamarie forgotten that she is one of the university’s most senior leaders? The proposed austerity measures can only be understood as a choice that the Dean has made with other university leaders, not an obligation which has been forced on her by third parties.

The case for urgent Faculty cost reductions has not yet been made. The story we have been told is that across the university as a whole, (1) ‘growth neutral’ cost per student has been rising faster than average fee growth, (2) student load growth has countered this ‘margin compression’, but (3) we are due to reach the limits of load growth in the next few years, and when we do, this will begin to eat into the university’s operating margin.

Every step of this argument involves a complex set of factors, some subject to a lot of uncertainty. We have asked for the modelling behind management’s projections of cost and revenue growth. To have an informed discussion of alternative ways of dealing with the institution’s financial future, we need to know what the variables are, and what might affect them - both things in our control and beyond our control.

Even taking the management story at face value, the urgency of the restructuring process is far out of line with the numbers we have seen. The $3.6m cost base reduction figure is entirely arbitrary - and a small fraction of the $36.9m combined discretionary operating surplus (after central cost allocation) across all schools in the Faculty last year, despite all the disruption of COVID. This year, that combined surplus is projected to balloon to $67.9m. In this context, we argue it is misleading and arbitrary to focus on small department and school-level deficits. Economies of scale in teaching mean that some parts of the university cross-subsidise others—this has long been standard operating procedure.

Meanwhile, for the institution as a whole, numbers are looking very healthy. The university recorded an incredible $109m surplus for 2020 a far cry from the massive deficit projected a year ago. Enrolment and revenue for 2021 has so far wildly exceeded the projections management presented during the voluntary redundancy change process in September. Then, EFTSL was projected to be 54,646, and student revenue $1.798 billion. After census date, the 2021 projections were revised to more than 60,000 EFTSL and student revenue above $2 billion (Briefing from Stephen Garton and Wayne Andrews, 26 April). These numbers exceed even the pre-COVID long-term budget projections for 2021 made in 2019.

The urgency with which the Dean is pursuing cost savings is utterly out of line with the current financial situation of the Faculty or University, and with management’s own account of the time scale over which the ‘margin compression’ will bite. Discussion should not take place without full disclosure of the data and modelling behind management projections.

Our students’ education, and our own job-security, must not be jeopardized by either the austerity fundamentalism or the ambition of incompetent upper management – the same management that, in our view, has overseen a sorry sequence of epic failures in recent times, including the multiple systems failures of earlier this year and the seemingly monumental white elephant of the Bachelor of Advanced Studies.

As members know, we are about to start negotiations for the new Enterprise Agreement. Those negotiations are timely as the appropriate place for serious discussions about the university’s future. We nevertheless encourage members to make submissions to the website that the Dean has established, and to insist that their views be respected and addressed.

You are welcome to send ideas to us as well if you want your voice heard!

Please join out meeting on June 30th, we will discuss the collective responses we can make, and the next steps to ensure our Faculty does not adopt a ‘Future Fix’ for something that ain’t broken!

We look forward to seeing you there.

IU,
On behalf of FASS members"

Religious leaders call on University of Chester to end redundancies in theology department 23/06/2021

AN “UNNECESSARY ACT OF VANDALISM”: UNIVERSITY OF CHESTER RELIGIOUS STUDIES DEPARTMENT SAVED AFTER ACADEMIC & COMMUNITY FIGHTBACK

While the department of Studies in Religion at the University of Sydney is still under threat, we are thrilled to learn that the proposed closure of the department of Theology and Religious Studies at the University of Chester, UK has been completely overturned after a significant fightback from academics, religious leaders, and community members around the world.

https://www.churchtimes.co.uk/articles/2021/23-april/news/uk/religious-leaders-call-on-university-of-chester-to-end-redundancies-in-theology-department?fbclid=IwAR0uiupBjEmd4Fh0n6OLNMujYeNfO26nAjeEHfuzqCjYsM2bcyM7A1SA_1g

Religious leaders call on University of Chester to end redundancies in theology department Colleagues declare cuts an ‘unnecessary act of vandalism’

Save Studies in Religion at the University of Sydney: An open letter to the Vice Chancellor and University Executive from supporters of the critical academic study of religion 21/06/2021

SIGN AND SHARE: OPEN LETTER TO SAVE STUDIES IN RELIGION AT USYD!

"The idea of a state/religion divide is ensured in our Constitution – but in order for this to be thoroughly maintained the scholarly examination of what the ‘religious’ actually is must continue at the highest levels of scholarly discourse."

Save Studies in Religion at the University of Sydney: An open letter to the Vice Chancellor and University Executive from supporters of the critical academic study of religion This action was initiated on the land of the Gadigal people of the Eora Nation, on whose land the University of Sydney also sits, and is endorsed by supporters located on the unceded lands of displaced peoples around Australia and the world. We are joined in solidarity with those whose sovereignty w...

Caught in the university crisis 20/06/2021

CAUGHT IN THE UNIVERSITY CRISIS

“At Sydney University, there is talk of ditching two departments – Studies in Religion, and Theatre and Performance Studies.

That would be bad luck for Alana Bowden, who is wanting to do a PhD across both those departments.

Her story is a snapshot of what's happening across the university sector.”

https://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/saturdayextra/new-document/13400176

Caught in the university crisis At Sydney University, there is talk of ditching two departments – Studies in Religion, and Theatre and Performance Studies.

20/06/2021

82 more academic jobs lost! Shame on Macquarie Uni!

Sign the petition and stand against staff cuts at Macquarie Uni and let us know about staff cuts that are affected your degree!

Last Friday, after the end of semester, the management of Macquarie University has announced which staff will take forced redundancies in this most recent rounds of cutbacks. This cut of 82 academic teaching staff, which has been rumoured since the beginning of the year, is on top of over 300+ staff who were sacked last year.

Macquarie University is a multi-million dollar institution. It has hundreds of millions in infrastructure and assets. It is currently planning to spend $60m rebuilding the law school. A recent NSW government report also stated that Macquarie University has gained hundreds of student enrolments over the last year, but despite this Bruce Dowton and management cry poor for lack of funding. University is a multi-million dollar institution. It has hundreds of millions in infrastructure and assets. It is currently planning to spend $60m rebuilding the law school. A recent NSW government report also stated that Macquarie University has gained hundreds of student enrolments over the last year, but despite this Bruce Dowton and management cry poor for lack of funding.

We have also heard that some of these staff redundancies may end in the dissolution of entire faculties, completely destroying the education of many students at this campus. Management want to run Macquarie as a corporation, where only the bottom line counts.

Comment to let us know if you have any information about which degrees will be affected by these changes.

Sign and share the petition: https://www.megaphone.org.au/petitions/safe-our-staff-macquarie-student-petition-against-staff-cuts-1?source=rawlink&utm_source=rawlink&share=23040041-2ddd-42cc-8b51-b679a6793bc1

Organising meeting FB event: https://www.facebook.com/events/1506822856328295

Universities ramping up ‘hybrid’ learning means double the work for same pay, staff say 20/06/2021

DOUBLE THE WORK FOR THE SAME PAY

'Izabella Nantsou teaches theatre and performance studies at the University of Sydney as a casual tutor. She said any extra administrative work came out of the personal unpaid time of casual staff.

“I’m a casual tutor and we get only a finite amount of time and payment to do lesson plans,” she said. “The expectation is that we do those in our own time and ahead of time.”'

https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2021/jun/20/universities-ramping-up-hybrid-learning-means-double-the-work-for-same-pay-staff-say?CMP=Share_AndroidApp_Other

Universities ramping up ‘hybrid’ learning means double the work for same pay, staff say Teachers say plans by Australian universities to boost in-person classes while keeping online options will greatly increase their workload

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