Office on Aging at the College of Southern Idaho

The Office on Aging serves as Idaho’s Area IV Agency on Aging. We help seniors in the eight rural counties of south central Idaho. For the last 30 years, the CSI-Office on Aging has developed and coordinated such services as:
Home Delivered Meals
Information and Assistance
Respite help for caregivers
Homemaker Services
Caregiver Services
Job and Volunteer opportunities
Transportation, and more to assist older persons
Legal Assistance

From a start of five communities with meals for seniors, Magic Valley now has 18 communities where seniors can gather with friends and neighbors for nutritious meals.

Operating as usual

09/02/2021
Photos from Office on Aging at the College of Southern Idaho's post 09/02/2021

Photos from Office on Aging at the College of Southern Idaho's post

08/26/2021
08/25/2021
08/25/2021
Photos from Office on Aging at the College of Southern Idaho's post 08/20/2021

Photos from Office on Aging at the College of Southern Idaho's post

07/30/2021

[07/29/21]   How can people protect their health when temperatures are extremely high?
Remember to keep cool and use common sense. Drink plenty of fluid, replace salts and minerals, wear appropriate clothing and sunscreen, pace yourself, stay cool indoors, schedule outdoor activities carefully, use a buddy system, monitor those at risk, and adjust to the environment.
How much should I drink during hot weather?
During hot weather you will need to increase your fluid intake, regardless of your activity level. Don’t wait until you’re thirsty to drink. During heavy exercise in a hot environment, drink enough non-alcoholic cool fluids each hour to maintain normal color and amount of urine output.
Should I take salt tablets during hot weather?
Do not take salt tablets unless directed by your doctor. Heavy sweating removes salt and minerals from the body. These are necessary for your body and must be replaced. The easiest and safest way to do this is through your diet. Drink fruit juice or a sports beverage when you exercise or work in the heat.
What is the best clothing for hot weather or a heat wave?

Wear as little clothing as possible when you are at home. Choose lightweight, light-colored, loose-fitting clothing. In the hot sun, a wide-brimmed hat will provide shade and keep the head cool. If you must go outdoors, be sure to apply sunscreen 30 minutes prior to going out and continue to reapply according to the package directions. Sunburn affects your body’s ability to cool itself and causes a loss of body fluids. It also causes pain and damages the skin.
What should I do if I work in a hot environment?
Pace yourself. If you are not accustomed to working or exercising in a hot environment, start slowly and pick up the pace gradually. If exertion in the heat makes your heart pound and leaves you gasping for breath, STOP all activity. Get into a cool area or at least in the shade, and rest, especially if you become lightheaded, confused, weak, or faint.
This information provided by NCEH’s Health Studies Branch.

[07/29/21]   How effective are electric fans in preventing heat-related illness?

Electric fans may provide comfort, but when the temperature is in the high 90s, fans will not prevent heat-related illness. Taking a cool shower or bath or moving to an air-conditioned place is a much better way to cool off. Air conditioning is the strongest protective factor against heat-related illness. Exposure to air conditioning for even a few hours a day will reduce the risk for heat-related illness. Consider visiting a shopping mall or public library for a few hours.

[07/29/21]   What are heat cramps and who is affected?
Heat cramps are muscle pains or spasms – usually in the abdomen, arms, or legs – that may occur in association with strenuous activity. People who sweat a lot during strenuous activity are prone to heat cramps. This sweating depletes the body’s salt and moisture. The low salt level in the muscles causes painful cramps. Heat cramps may also be a symptom of heat exhaustion. If you have heart problems or are on a low-sodium diet, seek medical attention for heat cramps.
What should I do if I have heat cramps?
If medical attention is not necessary, take the following steps:
• Stop all activity and sit quietly in a cool place.
• Drink clear juice or a sports beverage.
• Do not return to strenuous activity for a few hours after the cramps subside because further exertion may lead to heat exhaustion or heat stroke.
• Seek medical attention for heat cramps if they do not subside in 1 hour.
What is heat rash?

Heat rash is a skin irritation caused by excessive sweating during hot, humid weather. It can occur at any age but is most common in young children. Heat rash looks like a red cluster of pimples or small blisters. It is more likely to occur on the neck and upper chest, in the groin, under the breasts, and in elbow creases.
What is the best treatment for heat rash?
The best treatment for heat rash is to provide a cooler, less humid environment. Keep the affected area dry. Dusting powder may be used to increase comfort.
Can medications increase the risk of heat-related illness?
The risk for heat-related illness and death may increase among people using the following drugs: (1) psychotropics, which affect psychic function, behavior, or experience (e.g. haloperidol or chlorpromazine); (2) medications for Parkinson’s disease, because they can inhibit perspiration; (3) tranquilizers such as phenothiazines, butyrophenones, and thiozanthenes; and (4) diuretic medications or “water pills” that affect fluid balance in the body.
How effective are electric fans in preventing heat-related illness?

[07/29/21]   What should I do if I see someone with any of the warning signs of heat stroke?
If you see any of these signs, you may be dealing with a life-threatening emergency. Have someone call for immediate medical assistance while you begin cooling the victim. Do the following:
• Get the victim to a shady area.
• Cool the victim rapidly, using whatever methods you can. For example, immerse the victim in a tub of cool water; place the person in a cool shower; spray the victim with cool water from a garden hose; sponge the person with cool water; or if the humidity is low, wrap the victim in a cool, wet sheet and fan him or her vigorously.
• Monitor body temperature and continue cooling efforts until the body temperature drops to 101-102°F.
• If emergency medical personnel are delayed, call the hospital emergency room for further instructions.
• Do not give the victim alcohol to drink.
• Get medical assistance as soon as possible.
What is heat exhaustion?
Heat exhaustion is a milder form of heat-related illness that can develop after several days of exposure to high temperatures and inadequate or unbalanced replacement of fluids. Those most prone to heat exhaustion are elderly people, those with high blood pressure, and those working or exercising in a hot environment.
What are the warning signs of heat exhaustion?
The warning signs of heat exhaustion include the following:
• Heavy sweating
• Paleness
• Muscle cramps
• Tiredness
• Weakness
• Dizziness
• Headache
• Nausea or vomiting
• Fainting
The skin may be cool and moist. The pulse rate will be fast and weak, and breathing will be fast and shallow. If heat exhaustion is untreated, it may progress to heat stroke. See medical attention if symptoms worsen or last longer than one hour.
What steps can be taken to cool the body during heat exhaustion?

• Drink cool, nonalcoholic beverages.
• Rest.
• Take a cool shower, bath, or sponge bath.
• Seek an air-conditioned environment.
• Wear lightweight clothing.

Photos from Office on Aging at the College of Southern Idaho's post 07/29/2021

Photos from Office on Aging at the College of Southern Idaho's post

07/29/2021

People aged 65 years or older are more prone to heat-related health problems. If you’re an older adult or a caretaker, review this page for information on how you or the person you’re caring for can stay safe during the heat.
CARETAKER CHECKLIST
Keep a close eye on those in your care by visiting them at least twice a day, and ask yourself these questions:
• Are they drinking enough water?
• Do they have access to air conditioning?
• Do they know how to keep cool?
• Do they show any signs of heat stress?
Why are older adults more prone to heat stress?
• Older adults do not adjust as well as young people to sudden changes in temperature.
• They are more likely to have a chronic medical condition that changes normal body responses to heat.
• They are more likely to take prescription medicines that affect the body’s ability to control its temperature or sweat.
Stay cool, stay hydrated
• Stay in air-conditioned buildings as much as possible. If your home doesn’t have air conditioning, contact your local health department, or locate an air-conditioned shelter in your area.
• Do not rely on a fan as your main cooling source when it’s really hot outside.
• Drink more water than usual and don’t wait until you’re thirsty to drink.
o If your doctor limits the amount of fluids you drink or has you on water pills, ask them how much you should drink during hot weather.
• Don’t use the stove or oven to cook—it will make you and your house hotter.
• Wear loose, lightweight, light-colored clothing.
• Take cool showers or baths to cool down.
• Do not engage in very strenuous activities and get plenty of rest.
• Check on a friend or neighbor and have someone do the same for you.
• Follow additional tips on how to prevent heat-related illness.
Stay informed
• Check the local news for health and safety updates.
• Seek medical care immediately if you have, or someone you know has, symptoms of heat-related illness like muscle cramps, headaches, nausea or vomiting.

People aged 65 years or older are more prone to heat-related health problems. If you’re an older adult or a caretaker, review this page for information on how you or the person you’re caring for can stay safe during the heat.
CARETAKER CHECKLIST
Keep a close eye on those in your care by visiting them at least twice a day, and ask yourself these questions:
• Are they drinking enough water?
• Do they have access to air conditioning?
• Do they know how to keep cool?
• Do they show any signs of heat stress?
Why are older adults more prone to heat stress?
• Older adults do not adjust as well as young people to sudden changes in temperature.
• They are more likely to have a chronic medical condition that changes normal body responses to heat.
• They are more likely to take prescription medicines that affect the body’s ability to control its temperature or sweat.
Stay cool, stay hydrated
• Stay in air-conditioned buildings as much as possible. If your home doesn’t have air conditioning, contact your local health department, or locate an air-conditioned shelter in your area.
• Do not rely on a fan as your main cooling source when it’s really hot outside.
• Drink more water than usual and don’t wait until you’re thirsty to drink.
o If your doctor limits the amount of fluids you drink or has you on water pills, ask them how much you should drink during hot weather.
• Don’t use the stove or oven to cook—it will make you and your house hotter.
• Wear loose, lightweight, light-colored clothing.
• Take cool showers or baths to cool down.
• Do not engage in very strenuous activities and get plenty of rest.
• Check on a friend or neighbor and have someone do the same for you.
• Follow additional tips on how to prevent heat-related illness.
Stay informed
• Check the local news for health and safety updates.
• Seek medical care immediately if you have, or someone you know has, symptoms of heat-related illness like muscle cramps, headaches, nausea or vomiting.

07/26/2021
07/26/2021
07/14/2021
07/14/2021
06/30/2021
06/30/2021
06/30/2021
06/30/2021
06/30/2021
06/21/2021

OFFICE ON AGING OPEN HOUSE AND SUZANNE'S RETIREMENT
JUNE 15, 2021

OFFICE ON AGING OPEN HOUSE AND SUZANNE'S RETIREMENT
JUNE 15, 2021

06/21/2021

OFFICE ON AGING OPEN HOUSE AND SUZANNE'S RETIREMENT
JUNE 15, 2021

OFFICE ON AGING OPEN HOUSE AND SUZANNE'S RETIREMENT
JUNE 15, 2021

06/21/2021

OFFICE ON AGING OPEN HOUSE AND SUZANNE'S RETIREMENT
JUNE 15, 2021

OFFICE ON AGING OPEN HOUSE AND SUZANNE'S RETIREMENT
JUNE 15, 2021

06/21/2021

OFFICE ON AGING OPEN HOUSE AND SUZANNE'S RETIREMENT
JUNE 15, 2021

OFFICE ON AGING OPEN HOUSE AND SUZANNE'S RETIREMENT
JUNE 15, 2021

[06/18/21]   FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

June 17, 2021



Idaho observes Juneteenth as new legal public holiday



Boise, Idaho – Governor Brad Little issued a proclamation today recognizing June 19 – known as “Juneteenth” – as a new legal public holiday observed by Idaho Code following the passage of the Juneteenth National Independence Day Act, which President Joe Biden signed into law on June 17, 2021.



State of Idaho executive branch entities will observe the holiday on June 18.



The text of Governor Little’s proclamation follows:



JUNETEENTH NATIONAL INDEPENDENCE DAY



WHEREAS, Juneteenth celebrates the end of slavery in the United States and it is also known as Emancipation Day; and



WHEREAS, on June 19, 1865, Major General Gordon Granger arrived in Galveston, Texas, and announced the end of the Civil War and the end of slavery. Although the Emancipation Proclamation came more than two years earlier on January 1, 1863, many slave owners continued to hold their slaves captive after the announcement, so Juneteenth became a symbolic date representing African American freedom; and



WHEREAS, all Idahoans honor the countless contributions made by African Americans to our state and our nation; and



WHEREAS, Juneteenth marks the celebration of not just a moment in the past but also a renewed shared commitment to uniting as Americans to ensure equality and opportunity are a reality for all Americans, in the present and the future; and



WHEREAS, the United States Congress passed the Juneteenth National Independence Day Act recognizing June 19 as a legal public holiday, which President of the United States Joseph R. Biden Jr. signed into law on June 17, 2021; and



WHEREAS, pursuant to Idaho Code §§ 73-108 and 67-5302, Saturday, June 19, 2021 is a new holiday recognized and observed by the State of Idaho; and



WHEREAS, holidays occurring on a Saturday are observed on the preceding Friday.



NOW, THEREFORE, I, BRAD LITTLE, Governor of the State of Idaho, and pursuant to Idaho Code, do hereby recognize Juneteenth as a holiday and that state offices will be closed on Friday, June 18, 2021. However, the Office of the Governor will remain open and available to assist agencies and members of the public.



IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand and caused to be affixed the Great Seal of the State of Idaho at the Capitol in Boise on this 17th day of June in the year of our Lord two thousand and twenty-one.



BRAD LITTLE

GOVERNOR



# # #



NEWS MEDIA CONTACT: Marissa Morrison, Press Secretary

208-943-1686 or [email protected]

--

06/15/2021

June 15, 2021

June 15, 2021

Photos from Office on Aging at the College of Southern Idaho's post 06/15/2021

World Elder Abuse Awareness Day is June 15th
World Elder Abuse Awareness Day (WEAAD) was launched on June 15, 2006 by the International Network for the Prevention of Elder Abuse and the World Health Organization at the United Nations.

The purpose of WEAAD is to provide an opportunity for communities around the world to promote a better understanding of abuse and neglect of older persons by raising awareness of the cultural, social, economic and demographic processes affecting elder abuse and neglect.

In addition, WEAAD is in support of the United Nations International Plan of Action acknowledging the significance of elder abuse as a public health and human rights issue. WEAAD serves as a call-to-action for individuals, organizations, and communities to raise awareness about elder abuse, neglect, and exploitation.

06/11/2021

[06/08/21]   This message is sent to all Alzheimer's Association and Alzheimer's Impact Movement board members, all Alzheimer's Association staff, and volunteers and supporters of AIM and the Alzheimer's Association.

The Alzheimer’s Association welcomes and celebrates today’s historic Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval of aducanumab for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease.

While certainly not a cure, this is the first ever FDA-approved treatment for the underlying biology of Alzheimer’s, not just the symptoms. Slowing progression for those with Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) due to Alzheimer’s disease or Alzheimer’s dementia in its earliest stage offers the potential for more precious time for diagnosed individuals and their loved ones.

This new treatment approval and sustained progress in the research field benefit from years of investment and relentless dedication to our vision of a world without Alzheimer's and all other dementia.

The advances the Alzheimer’s Association has been able to drive on behalf of our constituents, to bring us to this historic moment, are thanks to you and others who have been so supportive. I am deeply grateful to you for the role you have played to make this day possible. Thank you!

With your support, the Alzheimer’s Association has advanced research in many ways, including directly funding the tools for early detection that have facilitated development of new treatments.

Of course, as I’m sure you realize, our work is not done. The fight to end Alzheimer’s is as urgent as ever. As the leader in the quest to end Alzheimer’s and all other dementia, you can be assured that the Alzheimer’s Association will fight to ensure access to this treatment and ultimately others for all communities. We won’t stop until the day our vision becomes reality for everyone.

I look forward to sharing more with you as this treatment becomes available and others advance. I hope you can join us for a special volunteer meeting on Tuesday, June 8 at 5 p.m. CT. To add the event to your calendar, click one of these links:
Google Calendar | Outlook/Hotmail Calendar | iCal/Other Calendar

Thank you again, as always, for everything you have done and everything you continue to do to drive our mission advances and to make a difference today and tomorrow for so many others.

Sincerely,

Harry Johns Signature

Harry Johns
Chief Executive Officer

If you or a loved one is experiencing memory changes, the Alzheimer’s Association strongly encourages speaking with a health care provider for a thorough evaluation, diagnosis and to discuss treatment options. Visit the Alzheimer’s Association at alz.org, or reach our Helpline 24/7 at 800.272.3900.

Our Story


For the last 30 years, the CSI-Office on Aging has developed and coordinated such services as:
Home Delivered Meals
Information and Assistance
Case Management
Respite help for caregivers
Homemaker Services
Caregiver Services
Job and Volunteer opportunities
Transportation, and more to assist older persons.

From a start of five communities with meals for seniors, Magic Valley now has 18 communities where seniors can gather with friends and neighbors for nutritious meals.

Older people also have access to legal services, institutional ombudsman services, and adult protection investigation assistance for alleged abuse, neglect or exploitation.

We have support groups, which meet regularly for grandparents raising grandchildren, caregivers and recently widowed people.

As our population ages, as longevity increases and as funds become more static, we must seek ways to preserve efficient access to services, which help keep elders independent. We believe our website will help make information easier for you.

CSI provides special benefits for people over the age of 60, including the CSI “Gold Card.” This allows seniors to take any CSI accredited course for free, plus get a variety of other services at reduced rates. CSI also has a nationally recognized (and fun) exercise class for people 60 to 96, which is held at 10 locations.

Please call us if you need information or have a special situation you would like to discuss, at 1-800-574-8656 or (208) 736-2122 (8:00 am – 5 pm, Monday – Friday, closed 12-1 pm for lunch)
Our office is on the campus of the College of Southern Idaho, at
315 Falls Avenue,
P.O. Box 1238,
Twin Falls, ID 83303-1238

We also need your help. Please give us feedback on how we can make this website more beneficial for you.

If you want someone from the Office on Aging to talk to a group you are involved with, or if you have questions, please call us
in Twin Falls at 736-2122,
or toll-free at 1-800-574-8656.

Thank you for visiting us.

Suzanne McCampbell
Director

Videos (show all)

Taenia talks about her job at the Office on Aging.
What does CSI Office on Aging do?  Shawna Wasko the Public Information/Contracts Manager tells us in this short video.

Location

Website

ooa.csi.edu

Address


650 Addison Ave W, Suite 424
Twin Falls, ID
83301

General information

The CSI Office on Aging provides a wide range of services to seniors aged 60 and older and to family members of a senior citizen. The Office on Aging is located on the Twin Falls campus of the College of Southern Idaho with a satellite office in Burley. The CSI Office on Aging serves the eight counties of the Magic Valley: Blaine Camas Cassia Gooding Jerome Lincoln Minidoka Twin Falls

Opening Hours

Monday 8am - 5pm
Tuesday 8am - 5pm
Wednesday 8am - 5pm
Thursday 8am - 5pm
Friday 8am - 5pm
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