Office on Aging at the College of Southern Idaho

The Office on Aging serves as Idaho’s Area IV Agency on Aging. We help seniors in the eight rural counties of south central Idaho. For the last 30 years, the CSI-Office on Aging has developed and coordinated such services as:
Home Delivered Meals
Information and Assistance
Respite help for caregivers
Homemaker Services
Caregiver Services
Job and Volunteer opportunities
Transportation, and more to assist older persons
Legal Assistance

From a start of five communities with meals for seniors, Magic Valley now has 18 communities where seniors can gather with friends and neighbors for nutritious meals.

Operating as usual

02/16/2022
02/16/2022
Photos from Office on Aging at the College of Southern Idaho's post 02/15/2022

Photos from Office on Aging at the College of Southern Idaho's post

Photos from Office on Aging at the College of Southern Idaho's post 02/10/2022

Photos from Office on Aging at the College of Southern Idaho's post

Photos from Office on Aging at the College of Southern Idaho's post 02/10/2022

Photos from Office on Aging at the College of Southern Idaho's post

Photos from Office on Aging at the College of Southern Idaho's post 02/10/2022

Photos from Office on Aging at the College of Southern Idaho's post

Photos from Office on Aging at the College of Southern Idaho's post 02/09/2022

Photos from Office on Aging at the College of Southern Idaho's post

Photos from Office on Aging at the College of Southern Idaho's post 02/09/2022

Photos from Office on Aging at the College of Southern Idaho's post

Photos from Office on Aging at the College of Southern Idaho's post 02/09/2022

Photos from Office on Aging at the College of Southern Idaho's post

02/09/2022

Eat Right
Eat Right with MyPlate
Food, Nutrition and Health Tips from the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics
Find your healthy eating routine using these recommendations from the
2020-2025 Dietary Guidelines for Americans.
Simply start with small changes to make healthier choices you can enjoy.
Make half your plate fruits
and vegetables:
Focus on whole fruits.
• Choose whole, cut or pureed fruits –
fresh, frozen, dried or canned in 100% juice.
• Enjoy fruit with meals, as snacks or as
a dessert.
Make half your plate fruits
and vegetables:
Vary your veggies.
• Try adding fresh, frozen or canned
vegetables to salads, sides and main dishes.
• Choose a variety of colorful veggies
prepared in healthful ways: steamed,
sautéed, roasted or raw.
Make half your grains
whole grains.
• Look for whole grains listed first on the
ingredients list - try oatmeal, popcorn,
teff, quinoa, millet, bulgur, brown rice,
or breads, crackers and noodles made with
whole-grain flours.
• Limit grain desserts and snacks such as
cakes, cookies and pastries.
This tip sheet is provided by:
For a referral to a registered dietitian nutritionist and for additional food and
nutrition information, visit www.eatright.org.
he Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics is the world’s
largest organization of food and nutrition professionals.
The Academy is committed to improving health and
advancing the profession of dietetics through research,
education and advocacy.
Authored by Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics staff registered dietitian nutritionists.
Sources: MyPlate.gov
© Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Reproduction of this tip sheet is permitted for educational purposes. Reproduction for sales purposes is not authorized.
Limit
MyPlate.gov
Dairy
MyPlate.gov
Vary your protein
routine.
Choose foods and beverages
with less added sugars,
saturated fat, and sodium.
Move to low-fat or fat-free
dairy milk or yogurt.
• Mix up your protein foods to include
seafood, beans, peas and lentils, unsalted
nuts and seeds, soy products, eggs, and lean
meats and poultry.
• Try meatless meals made with beans and
have fish or seafood twice a week.
• Use the Nutrition Facts Label and
ingredients list to limit items high in
saturated fat, sodium and added sugars.
• Choose vegetable oils instead of butter and
oil-based sauces and dips instead of ones
with butter, cream or cheese.
• Drink water instead of sugary drinks
• Choose fat-free milk, yogurt and calcium fortified soymilk to cut back on saturated fat.
• Replace sour cream, cream and regular
cheese with low-fat or fat-free yogurt, milk
and cheese.

02/09/2022

www.homefoodsafety.org

Eat Right
20 Health Tips
Food, Nutrition and Health Tips from the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics
1. Eat Breakfast
Start your day with a healthy breakfast that
includes lean protein, whole grains, fruits and
vegetables. Try making a breakfast burrito with
scrambled eggs, low-fat cheese, salsa and a
whole wheat tortilla or a parfait with low-fat
plain yogurt, fruit and whole grain cereal.
2. Make Half Your Plate Fruits and Vegetables
Fruits and veggies add color, flavor and texture
plus vitamins, minerals and dietary fiber to
your plate. Make 2 cups of fruit and 2 ½ cups
of vegetables your daily goal. Experiment with
different types, including fresh, frozen and
canned.
3. Watch Portion Sizes
Use half your plate for fruits and vegetables and
the other half for grains and lean protein foods.
Complete the meal with a serving of fat-free
or low-fat milk or yogurt. Measuring cups may
also help you compare your portions to the
recommended serving size.
4. Be Active
Regular physical activity has many health
benefits. Start by doing what exercise you
can. Children and teens should get 60 or more
minutes of physical activity per day, and adults
at least two hours and 30 minutes per week.
You don't have to hit the gym – take a walk after
dinner or put on music and dance at home.
5. Get to Know Food Labels
Reading the Nutrition Facts panel can help
you choose foods and drinks to meet your
nutrient needs.
6. Fix Healthy Snacks
Healthy snacks can sustain your energy levels
between meals, especially when they include
a combination of foods. Choose from two or
more of the MyPlate food groups: grains, fruits,
vegetables, dairy, and protein. Try raw veggies
with low-fat cottage cheese or hummus, or a
tablespoon of nut or seed butter with an apple
or banana.
7. Consult an RDN
Whether you want to lose weight, lower your
health-risks or manage a chronic disease, consult
the experts! Registered dietitian nutritionists
can help you by providing sound, easy-to-follow
personalized nutrition advice.
8. Follow Food Safety Guidelines
Reduce your chances of getting sick with proper
food safety. This includes: regular hand washing,
separating raw foods from ready-to-eat foods,
cooking foods to the appropriate internal
temperature, and refrigerating food promptly.
Learn more about home food safety at
www.homefoodsafety.org.
9. Drink More Water
Quench your thirst with water instead of drinks
with added sugars. Stay hydrated and drink
plenty of water, especially if you are active, an
older adult or live or work in hot conditions.
10.Get Cooking
Preparing foods at home can be healthy,
rewarding and cost-effective. Master some
kitchen basics, like dicing onions or cooking
dried beans.
11.Order Out without Ditching Goals
You can eat out and stick to your healthy eating
plan! The key is to plan ahead, ask questions
and choose foods carefully. Compare nutrition
information, if available, and look for healthier
options that are grilled, baked, broiled
or steamed.
12.Enact Family Meal Time
Plan to eat as a family at least a few times each
week. Set a regular mealtime. Turn off the
TV, phones and other electronic devices to
encourage mealtime talk. Get kids involved in
meal planning and cooking and use this time to
teach them about good nutrition.
13.Banish Brown Bag Boredom
Whether it’s for work or school, prevent brown bag
boredom with easy-to-make, healthy lunch ideas.
Try a whole-wheat pita pocket with veggies and
hummus or a low sodium vegetable soup with
whole grain crackers or a salad of mixed greens
with low-fat dressing and a hard boiled egg.
14.Reduce Added Sugars
Foods and drinks with added sugars can
contribute empty calories and little or no
nutrition. Review the new and improved
Nutrition Facts Label or ingredients list to
identify sources of added sugars.
15.Eat Seafood Twice a Week
Seafood – fish and shellfish – contains a range
of nutrients including healthy omega-3 fats.
Salmon, trout, oysters and sardines are higher in
omega-3s and lower in mercury.
16.Explore New Foods and Flavors
Add more nutrition and eating pleasure by
expanding your range of food choices. When
shopping, make a point of selecting a fruit,
vegetable or whole grain that’s new to you or
your family.
17.Experiment with Plant-Based Meals
Expand variety in your menus with budgetfriendly meatless meals. Many recipes that
use meat and poultry can be made without.
Vegetables, beans, and lentils are all great
substitutes. Try including one meatless meal per
week to start.
18. Make an Effort to Reduce Food Waste
Check out what foods you have on hand before
stocking up at the grocery store. Plan meals
based on leftovers and only buy perishable
foods you will use or freeze within a couple of
days. Managing these food resources at home
can help save nutrients and money.
19.Slow Down at Mealtime
Instead of eating on the run, try sitting down
and focusing on the food you’re about to eat.
Dedicating time to enjoy the taste and textures of
foods can have a positive effect on your
food intake.
20.Supplement with Caution
Choose foods first for your nutrition needs. A
dietary supplement may be necessary when
nutrient requirements can’t be met or there is
a confirmed deficiency. If you’re considering a
vitamin, mineral or herbal supplement, be sure to
discuss safe and appropriate options with an RDN
or another healthcare provider before taking.
This tip sheet is provided by:
For a referral to a registered dietitian nutritionist
and for additional food and nutrition
information, visit www.eatright.org.
The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics is the world’s
largest organization of food and nutrition professionals.
The Academy is committed to improving health and
advancing the profession of dietetics through research,
education and advocacy.
Authored by Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics staff registered dietitian nutritionists.
© Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.

www.homefoodsafety.org

02/04/2022

Long-Term Care Ombudsman can Help!

01/31/2022
01/31/2022

Diet Smarts When You’re On Coumadin

If you’re on the blood-thinner Coumadin, a medication prescribed for people at increased risk of forming blood clots, you know that you have to be careful about the amount of foods with vitamin K that you eat. To make this meal planning easier, Dr. Gourmet, Tim Harlan, MD, a member of the Parentgiving expert panel, has just introduced a new book. With The Dr. Gourmet Diet for Coumadin Users, you can follow a normal, healthy diet while taking Coumadin—no avoiding salads or vegetables while you eat delicious food without worry. Dr. Gourmet’s book includes six weeks of healthy menus that will show you that eating on Coumadin can be tasty and varied, with recipes like Zucchini & Chevre Frittata and Blueberry Pancakes.
You’ll also get six weeks of shopping lists, making grocery trips quick and easy, plus 95+ delicious Coumadin safe recipes, information about managing your diet while taking Coumadin and ingredient and cooking tips throughout the book. Complete nutrition facts include the vitamin K content for each recipe, and you’ll also get ideal body weight tables to identify your target weight, and an estimated caloric intake needed to reach that ideal weight; breakfast, lunch, dinner and snack guidelines that detail meal options to suit any craving; weekly meal plans with complete grocery shopping lists; and recipe tags instantly identify serving sizes, meal time (breakfast, lunch, dinner or snack) and how much time is needed to prepare.
In addition to the book, Dr. Harlan, a board-certified internist and medical director at Tulane University School of Medicine, created two new iPhone Apps, vitKdiet and vitKfood, both of which take into special consideration the interactions and side effects of taking the anticoagulant drug and provide even more Coumadin-friendly recipes, full shopping lists, information about managing your diet and lists of vitamin K content in over 700 of the most common foods.

12/21/2021

Necessary Nutrients & How Seniors Can Get Them
Problem is that many people consume more calories than they need without taking in the recommended amounts of certain nutrients.
While studies will continue to debate whether certain foods or specific vitamins and minerals can prevent cancer and other diseases, one thing is clear: Eating a diet that provides these nutrients is certainly healthier for you than not. On the most basic level, the body needs vitamins, and minerals just to function.
Vitamins you need: A, C, D, E, K and the B vitamins—B1/thiamine, B2/riboflavin, B3/ niacin, B5/pantothenic acid, B6/pyridoxine, B7/biotin, B9/folic acid and B12/cyanocobalamin.
Minerals you need: the macro minerals—calcium, chloride, magnesium, phosphorus, potassium, sodium and sulfur and trace minerals (needed in small amounts)—cobalt, copper, fluoride, iodine, iron, manganese, selenium, and zinc.
Another debate is whether you can get all these necessary nutrients in food or if supplements are needed. Certainly, the more you can get through your diet, the better. Problem is, according to the US Dietary Guidelines for Americans, many people consume more calories than they need without taking in the recommended amounts of certain nutrients, and that's cause for concern.
For older adults, these AWOL nutrients are often calcium, needed for bone health; potassium, needed to regulate sodium; and magnesium which with these two other minerals helps lower blood pressure; and vitamins A, C, and E. Vitamins A, C, and E are important because they appear to deter plaque from forming on artery walls. Plaque forms because oxygen and the so-called bad LDL cholesterol combine in a process called oxidation. Vitamins A, C, and E are called "antioxidants" because they slow or stop the plaque-forming process. Vitamin A also helps prevent night blindness.
In addition, everyone over age 50 may be coming up short on vitamin B12, which helps prevent memory loss, because the body doesn't absorb it as well in later years; you can get it through protein sources, fortified foods, or supplements.
If you 't have any exposure to sunlight, the main natural source of vitamin D (either because it's not always possible or if you're prone to skin cancer), you'll need to get D from fortified foods and/or supplements (or about 15 minutes of unprotected sun exposure a day). Vitamin D is needed for the interaction with calcium for bone health. Taking vitamin D and calcium supplements is a question for the primary care physician if osteoporosis, or the risk of it, is an issue—it might not be possible to get all the calcium needed naturally through foods, about a quart of milk or the equivalent in dairy products every day.
Getting most of your vitamins and minerals through food doesn't have to be overwhelming or require piled-high plates. Usually, it's a matter of picking powerhouse foods before the bagel or slice of cake. And, since many foods supply an assortment of vitamins and minerals, you can add up required amounts faster by eating what's called nutrient-dense foods first. (Of course, stay away from any foods that the doctor has said to avoid if following a restrictive diet for health reasons.)
Making Smarter Choices
Make up as many of the day's meals as possible from a variety of these top food choices.
Vegetables, like asparagus, broccoli, peas, and zucchini provide: B7 and E, magnesium, phosphorus, and potassium. In addition:
• Orange vegetables, like carrots, pumpkin, sweet potatoes, squash provide beta-carotene used as vitamin A
• Green vegetables, like broccoli, celery and cabbage provide: B2 and selenium
• Green leafy vegetables, like spinach provide: A, B9, E and K, calcium, and magnesium
• Onions and garlic in particular (if tolerated) provide selenium and sulfur
Fresh fruit like apples, melon, pears, and plums provide: B vitamins, potassium, and copper. In addition:
• Citrus fruit, like oranges (also a source of B7), grapefruit and tangerines provide vitamin C
Whole grains, like barley, brown rice, buckwheat (kasha), oats, rye and whole wheat provide: B vitamins and E, chromium, magnesium, manganese, selenium, and zinc
Beans and legumes, like dried peas, lima, kidney and garbanzo beans and lentils provide: B1 and B7 and magnesium
Nuts, like almonds, cashews, walnuts, and hazelnuts provide: B1, B7 and E, copper, magnesium, and manganese
Seeds, like flaxseed, pumpkin, sesame, and sunflower seeds provide: B1 and E, copper, iron, magnesium, manganese, phosphorus, potassium, and zinc
Dairy products, like low fat milk, yogurt and cheese provide: A, B2, B7 (milk), B12, D (fortified milk) and K, calcium, phosphorus, and sulfur
Proteins
• Eggs provide: B5, B9, B12, D and E, phosphorus, and sulfur
• Fish, like cod, halibut, salmon, and tuna provide: B2, B3, B12, D (fatty fish), iron, phosphorus, and zinc. In addition, shellfish provides copper and iodine
• Meat provides: B1 (lean pork) B2, B3 (lean meats), B6, B7, B12, chromium, iron, phosphorus, sulfur, and zinc
• Organ meat, like liver provides: A (liver, fish liver oil), B1, B12, B9 and D (liver), copper, iron, and selenium
• Poultry provides: B2, iron and phosphorus
Vegetable oils, like sunflower, safflower and olive oil provide vitamin E
Wheat germ provides: B6, B9 and E and magnesium
Brewer's yeast: B5, B6 and B7, chromium, selenium, and zinc
A note about the other essential minerals in the diet: salt—which most people get too much of—provides chlorine, sodium, and iodine; and we get fluoride from fluoridated water.

Our Story


For the last 30 years, the CSI-Office on Aging has developed and coordinated such services as:
Home Delivered Meals
Information and Assistance
Case Management
Respite help for caregivers
Homemaker Services
Caregiver Services
Job and Volunteer opportunities
Transportation, and more to assist older persons.

From a start of five communities with meals for seniors, Magic Valley now has 18 communities where seniors can gather with friends and neighbors for nutritious meals.

Older people also have access to legal services, institutional ombudsman services, and adult protection investigation assistance for alleged abuse, neglect or exploitation.

We have support groups, which meet regularly for grandparents raising grandchildren, caregivers and recently widowed people.

As our population ages, as longevity increases and as funds become more static, we must seek ways to preserve efficient access to services, which help keep elders independent. We believe our website will help make information easier for you.

CSI provides special benefits for people over the age of 60, including the CSI “Gold Card.” This allows seniors to take any CSI accredited course for free, plus get a variety of other services at reduced rates. CSI also has a nationally recognized (and fun) exercise class for people 60 to 96, which is held at 10 locations.

Please call us if you need information or have a special situation you would like to discuss, at 1-800-574-8656 or (208) 736-2122 (8:00 am – 5 pm, Monday – Friday, closed 12-1 pm for lunch)
Our office is on the campus of the College of Southern Idaho, at
315 Falls Avenue,
P.O. Box 1238,
Twin Falls, ID 83303-1238

We also need your help. Please give us feedback on how we can make this website more beneficial for you.

If you want someone from the Office on Aging to talk to a group you are involved with, or if you have questions, please call us
in Twin Falls at 736-2122,
or toll-free at 1-800-574-8656.

Thank you for visiting us.

Suzanne McCampbell
Director

Videos (show all)

Taenia talks about her job at the Office on Aging.
What does CSI Office on Aging do?  Shawna Wasko the Public Information/Contracts Manager tells us in this short video.

Location

Telephone

Website

Address


650 Addison Ave W, Suite 424
Twin Falls, ID
83301

General information

The CSI Office on Aging provides a wide range of services to seniors aged 60 and older and to family members of a senior citizen. The Office on Aging is located on the Twin Falls campus of the College of Southern Idaho with a satellite office in Burley. The CSI Office on Aging serves the eight counties of the Magic Valley: Blaine Camas Cassia Gooding Jerome Lincoln Minidoka Twin Falls

Opening Hours

Monday 8am - 5pm
Tuesday 8am - 5pm
Wednesday 8am - 5pm
Thursday 8am - 5pm
Friday 8am - 5pm

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