Office on Aging at the College of Southern Idaho

Office on Aging at the College of Southern Idaho

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West End Senior Center looking for a Software Program for Inventory Control and Food Costing. Any ideas from other Centers would be helpful. Thanks.
Please share the following information with your friends/family/neighbors who may struggle with paying their property taxes.

If they are widowed (at any age), disabled (at any age), or over 65, they may be eligible for property tax reduction!!
Please post your end of life conference flyer and we will share it.

The Office on Aging serves as Idaho’s Area IV Agency on Aging. We help seniors in the eight rural For the last 30 years, the CSI-Office on Aging has developed and coordinated such services as:
Home Delivered Meals
Information and Assistance
Respite help for caregivers
Homemaker Services
Caregiver Services
Job and Volunteer opportunities
Transportation, and more to assist older persons
Legal Assistance

From a start of five communities with meals for seniors, Magic Valley now has 18 communities where seniors can gather with friends and neighbors for nutritious meals.

Operating as usual

10/05/2022
10/05/2022
10/05/2022
10/05/2022
09/30/2022
09/22/2022
09/22/2022
Photos from Office on Aging at the College of Southern Idaho's post 09/22/2022

Photos from Office on Aging at the College of Southern Idaho's post

Photos from Office on Aging at the College of Southern Idaho's post 09/22/2022

Photos from Office on Aging at the College of Southern Idaho's post

09/22/2022

Wed, 9/21/2022

🛋️ MYTH: IF I LIMIT MY ACTIVITY, I AM LESS LIKELY TO FALL. Not true! Staying physically active will actually help you retain strength and range of motion. Social activities also benefit overall health, engaging your brain and decreasing loneliness.

09/21/2022

Wed, 9/21/2022

🛋️ MYTH: IF I LIMIT MY ACTIVITY, I AM LESS LIKELY TO FALL. Not true! Staying physically active will actually help you retain strength and range of motion. Social activities also benefit overall health, engaging your brain and decreasing loneliness.

09/19/2022

Help long-term care residents be heard
• By MARILYN SHIROMA

• Sep 14, 2022

October is National Long-Term Care Residents’ Rights Month, a time to acknowledge the contributions and sacrifices many long-term care (LTC) residents have made to better our community and to call attention to the rights of residents in long-term care facilities.
Being a part of a community is essential to our well-being. Throughout the pandemic, residents of long-term care facilities were disconnected from the resident and staff communities within their facilities when activities and group dining were limited. Residents were disconnected from the broader local community when visitation was restricted, and many residents were unable to leave their facilities to participate in outside activities. This year’s Residents’ Rights Month theme “Inspiring Unity within Our Community” emphasizes the importance of fostering meaningful community within the facility and encouraging residents’ connection to their local community.
Residents’ Rights Month is an opportunity to focus on and celebrate awareness of dignity, respect and the rights of each resident. The federal Nursing Home Reform Law guarantees residents’ rights and places a strong emphasis on individual dignity, choice, and self-determination. The law also requires nursing homes to “promote and protect the rights of each resident.” Residents’ Rights Month is a time to raise awareness of these rights and celebrate residents.
Celebrate and acknowledge these rights by participating in Residents’ Rights Month events and calling on your local facilities to show their support by attending or organizing activities.

During Residents’ Rights Month, we recognize our local long-term care ombudsman program staff and volunteers, who work daily to promote residents’ rights, assist residents with complaints and provide information to those who need to find a long-term care facility. In this area, the ombudsman program serves 38 Assisted Living Facilities (1,032 beds) and 12 Skilled Nursing Facilities (713 beds). We advocate for the residents residing in eight counties of the Magic Valley, (Blaine, Camas, Cassia, Gooding, Jerome, Lincoln, Minidoka, and Twin Falls) to improve the quality of life for those who live in long-term care facilities.
As CSI Office on Aging Ombudsman Program celebrates Residents’ Rights, I encourage community members to connect with those they know who live in long-term care facilities, participate in Residents’ Rights Month events, or inquire about becoming a volunteer long-term care ombudsman. Your assistance and attention help to ensure that the voices of long-term care residents do not go unheard and demonstrates to residents that they have not been forgotten.
________________________________________
Marilyn Shiroma is the ombudsman manager at the CSI Office on Aging, south-central Idaho’s area agency on aging.

09/14/2022
Photos from Office on Aging at the College of Southern Idaho's post 09/08/2022

Photos from Office on Aging at the College of Southern Idaho's post

Photos from Office on Aging at the College of Southern Idaho's post 09/08/2022

Photos from Office on Aging at the College of Southern Idaho's post

Photos from Office on Aging at the College of Southern Idaho's post 09/08/2022

Photos from Office on Aging at the College of Southern Idaho's post

Photos from Office on Aging at the College of Southern Idaho's post 09/08/2022

Photos from Office on Aging at the College of Southern Idaho's post

09/08/2022
09/08/2022
Photos from Office on Aging at the College of Southern Idaho's post 09/08/2022

Photos from Office on Aging at the College of Southern Idaho's post

09/08/2022
09/08/2022

Thu, 9/8/2022
🤔 MYTH: USING A WALKER OR CANE MAKES ME MORE DEPENDENT. Actually, using them is important in maintaining independence! When we are mobile, we can actively participate in life. Have a physical therapist recommend your best option and teach you how to use it properly.

09/07/2022
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09/01/2022
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08/25/2022
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08/25/2022
08/24/2022

Health Tips for Seniors

By Reagan Greenwood
February 24, 2022

2. Focus on prevention

Many preventive care visits — including health screenings for cholesterol levels, colon cancer, heart problems, and more — can prevent seniors from missing a serious diagnosis. Current guidelines suggest that women over the age of 45 should schedule mammography screening for breast cancer annually, and men over age 50 should consider regularly testing for prostate cancer, according to the American Cancer Society. Seniors can also receive regular vaccinations to help prevent influenza and pneumonia.

3. Stay informed on medication management

If your loved one takes any medication, it’s important to review each prescription with their physician on a regular basis. Consider possible drug interactions and take note of any new symptoms or side effects — such as allergic reactions, drowsiness, or loss of appetite — your elderly loved one shows after changing or starting medications.

4. Get some sleep

Frequent waking and insomnia are common among seniors. But, it’s important to maintain a regular sleep schedule to maintain health. “Sleep hygiene” refers to a set of healthy sleep habits that can improve one’s ability to fall asleep and stay asleep, according to the American Academy of Sleep Medicine.

Simply waking up and going to bed at the same time can help seniors’ internal clock sync to their daily schedule. Avoid taking naps during the day, and stay away from alcohol or caffeine in the evening. It may also help to turn the lights down in the evening to spur drowsiness. And, always make sure your loved one’s bedroom is comfortable, cool, and quiet.

5. Remember cognitive health

Staying mentally active and learning new skills may even lead to improved thinking ability, according to the National Institute on Aging at the National Institutes of Health. Seniors should keep their minds sharp through various brain games and other engaging activities: Completing crossword puzzles, reading, writing, and trying new hobbies can stimulate seniors’ minds and help them engage with their surrounding environment to ward off cognitive decline.

6. Screen for vision changes

Most people notice a change in their vision by age 50. Seniors who wear glasses should have their prescription checked every year for changes, and they should have their eyes screened for issues such as glaucoma, a leading cause of blindness worldwide. Having the right pair of glasses can also reduce a senior’s chance of falling.

7. Socialize

According to the Journal of Health and Social Behavior, isolation and lack of socialization among seniors leads to low self-esteem, difficulty coping, and higher levels of stress hormones that could cause additional issues. Inflammation is common to stress-related diseases and can be triggered by the release of stress hormones. Research in the journal Frontiers in Human Neuroscience concludes that persistent inflammation over time can lead to serious health outcomes, including:

Cardiovascular disease

Metabolic disorders

Neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s

There are many opportunities for seniors to stay connected and social, from attending the local senior center to volunteering in the surrounding community. Time spent with family and grandchildren can always help seniors combat loneliness, especially if they have mobility issues that keep them from getting around. Such visits leave seniors feeling more positive, and that’s the best medicine of all.



8. Stay physically active

Exercise is important in all stages of life, but especially for seniors. Staying physically active may help seniors maintain a healthy weight and avoid chronic health problems, according to the National Institute of Health. Regular exercise can also make it easier for seniors to complete activities of daily living, according to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

Along with alleviating depression, physical activity can improve seniors’ energy levels, memory, and sleep. But what are the best exercises for seniors? Healthy seniors should focus on incorporating a combination of aerobic, balance, strength training, and other low-impact exercises. Be sure to talk with a health care professional to find out what type of exercise program best suits a senior’s needs.

With health under control, seniors can do more and remain active, which boosts overall well-being and gives caregivers a little less to worry about.

9. Take advantage of free physicals

Seniors newly enrolled in Medicare can access a free Initial Preventive Physical Examination. After having Medicare Part B for a year, seniors also receive a free annual “Wellness” visit every 12 months.

10. Visit the dentist every 6 months

The risk for cavities goes up with age. Furthermore, oral health is directly related to overall health: Many mouth infections can be linked to serious health conditions, such as diabetes, heart disease, and stroke. The American Dental Association outlines the various concerns seniors over 60 should have regarding their oral health. Lastly, in addition to brushing and flossing daily, seniors should regularly see their local dentist to maintain healthy teeth and gums.

08/24/2022

Health Tip for Seniors

By Reagan Greenwood
February 24, 2022

Eat healthy

Maintaining a healthy diet as you age is essential for living well. The digestive system slows down with age, so it becomes necessary to incorporate important vitamins and high-fiber foods — such as fruits, vegetables, and whole grains — into your loved one’s diet. Not only does adding fiber help seniors with maintaining a healthy diet, but it also can lower the risk of major health problems like stroke and heart disease.

Another health secret for seniors is to stay hydrated. Because they tend to generally feel less thirsty as they age, seniors are prone to dehydration. Make sure your loved one drinks plenty of water to stay energized and to avoid constipation and urinary tract infections.

Lack of appetite is a common cause of poor senior nutrition. It’s important to first address the causes of appetite decline in older people, according to research from the National Institute of Health Research. There can be many causes, but researchers concluded that simply improving the “mealtime ambiance” and “enhancing the flavor of food” can work wonders for a senior’s appetite.

Along with trying these tips to stimulate appetite in the elderly, you can really help support healthy eating habits by:

Encouraging shared mealtimes with friends and family

Offering visually appealing food

Suggesting a regular schedule for meals, snacks, and drinks

08/17/2022
08/17/2022
07/27/2022
07/14/2022

More than 6.5 million Americans aged 65 and older are dealing with depression on some level, according to the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI). For some, these feelings of sadness and despair did not appear until later in life. Despite this, NAMI says that for most older people battling depression, it has been an ongoing struggle for quite some time.

Depression is not “just part of growing old”

Many people associate feeling depressed with normal aging. This seems reasonable as a person’s health or living arrangements change, and family and friends pass. These situations might bring sadness, but depression is different. Depression is never “normal”, even in aging adults. It does happen though, and The National Institute on Aging (NIA) says there is one cause that stands out for older adults: isolation.

If adequate support and resources to accommodate an elder’s changing needs are provided, this debilitating mental health condition can be avoided. If depression is understood, it can be identified and addressed before it becomes a life-threatening situation.

07/14/2022

Be Aware of Exposure to Excessive heat
(Central District Health, ID 2021-0628)

We love our summers in Idaho but on occasion, we get a weather situation that can be not only harmful but downright dangerous. It happens when the temperature is over 100 degrees for more than one day. This is called an “extreme heat” situation and requires extra attention for ourselves and others, especially those who are over age 65 and/or have other medical conditions.

Heat stroke, heat exhaustion, and heat stresses are not uncommon during extremely hot temperatures. Heat stroke is the most serious.

Older adults over 65, people with chronic conditions, and individuals who work outdoors may be more prone to heat stress.

Heat stroke occurs when the body becomes unable to control its temperature: the body’s temperature rises rapidly, the body loses its ability to sweat, and it is unable to cool down. Body temperatures rise to 106°F or higher within 10 to 15 minutes. Heat stroke can cause death or permanent disability if emergency treatment is not sought.

If you notice any signs of heat exhaustion or stroke in yourself or those around you, seek medical help immediately.

Signs and symptoms of heat stroke vary but may include:

list of 6 items

 An extremely high body temperature (above 103°F)

 Red, hot, and dry skin (no sweating)

 Rapid, strong pulse

 Throbbing headache

 Dizziness

 Nausea

list end

Heat exhaustion is a milder form of heat-related illness that can develop after several days of exposure to hot temperatures and inadequate or unbalanced replacement of fluids.

Signs and symptoms of heat exhaustion vary but may include:

list of 12 items

 Heavy sweating

 Paleness

 Muscle cramps

 Tiredness

 Weakness

 Dizziness

 Headache

 Nausea or vomiting

 Fainting

 Skin: may be cool and moist

 Pulse rate: fast and weak

 Breathing: fast and shallow

Protect yourself and others

Air conditioning is the strongest protective factor against heat-related illness. Exposure to air conditioning for even a few hours a day will reduce the risk for heat-related illness (CDC).

If you do not have access to air-conditioning in your home, seek relief from the heat by visiting friends and family or while visiting public areas with air-conditioning. Because power outages are possible during extreme heat, if you are someone who relies on electricity to power medical devices, it is advised that you have a back-up plan – a neighbor or relative who can help or back-up power source.

Other helpful steps during days with extreme heat:

 Drink plenty of water.

 Wear light-colored, lightweight and loose-fitting clothes.

 Apply sunscreen at least 20 minutes before going outside (SPF 15+ is best).

 Limit exposure to the sun – stay out of the sun during the hottest part of the day (the sun is most powerful between 10 a.m. and 3 p.m.).

 Check up on relatives and neighbors.

 Keep a close eye on children and older adults for any signs of heat cramps, heat exhaustion, and heat stroke.

 Never leave young children, older adults, or pets unattended in a vehicle under any circumstances. Car interiors can reach lethal temperatures in a matter of minutes.

Our Story


For the last 30 years, the CSI-Office on Aging has developed and coordinated such services as:
Home Delivered Meals
Information and Assistance
Case Management
Respite help for caregivers
Homemaker Services
Caregiver Services
Job and Volunteer opportunities
Transportation, and more to assist older persons.

From a start of five communities with meals for seniors, Magic Valley now has 18 communities where seniors can gather with friends and neighbors for nutritious meals.

Older people also have access to legal services, institutional ombudsman services, and adult protection investigation assistance for alleged abuse, neglect or exploitation.

We have support groups, which meet regularly for grandparents raising grandchildren, caregivers and recently widowed people.

As our population ages, as longevity increases and as funds become more static, we must seek ways to preserve efficient access to services, which help keep elders independent. We believe our website will help make information easier for you.

CSI provides special benefits for people over the age of 60, including the CSI “Gold Card.” This allows seniors to take any CSI accredited course for free, plus get a variety of other services at reduced rates. CSI also has a nationally recognized (and fun) exercise class for people 60 to 96, which is held at 10 locations.

Please call us if you need information or have a special situation you would like to discuss, at 1-800-574-8656 or (208) 736-2122 (8:00 am – 5 pm, Monday – Friday, closed 12-1 pm for lunch)
Our office is on the campus of the College of Southern Idaho, at
315 Falls Avenue,
P.O. Box 1238,
Twin Falls, ID 83303-1238

We also need your help. Please give us feedback on how we can make this website more beneficial for you.

If you want someone from the Office on Aging to talk to a group you are involved with, or if you have questions, please call us
in Twin Falls at 736-2122,
or toll-free at 1-800-574-8656.

Thank you for visiting us.

Suzanne McCampbell
Director

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Location

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650 Addison Ave W, Suite 424
Twin Falls, ID
83301

Opening Hours

Monday 8am - 5pm
Tuesday 8am - 5pm
Wednesday 8am - 5pm
Thursday 8am - 5pm
Friday 8am - 5pm

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