Life Academy

Christ-centered education incorporating Montessori methods. Our Curriculum: Christian Montessori Model for preschool-1st grade. Dynamic Learning Activities to capture student interest.

Customized and Flexible Lessons according to what each student needs to learn. Life Academy provides an engaging learning experience, utilizing creative, hands-on teaching methods. Students are guided through their coursework in a way that will ignite a lifelong passion to learn and pursue the truth. Partnering with you to see Christ fully formed in our students...

Mission: The mission of Life Academy is to equip students for life and service.

Tips for Parents Who Are Suddenly Homeschooling
March 16, 2020 JennyUncategorized

I saw a great meme last week that said, “And just like that, we were all homeschoolers.” I laughed, but it didn’t even occur to me that it would apply to our family before the week was out. We are in unprecedented times for sure. I sought the advice of some of my favorite moms who have been doing this homeschool thing for awhile now, several of whom are also working moms.

Everyone’s situation will be different, but hopefully this advice will help you in these crazy days.

Pray together. Invite Jesus in to your home and your day.
Decide if you’re a pajamas homeschool mom. Some moms feel that everyone is much more productive if they get up and get dressed to start their day. Some families may feel differently. Figure out what works for your people.
Create a schedule. Find a schedule that works for your family and stick with it. How you start the day can set the tone for the day. Consider starting with some Bible time together.
Allow the kids breaks. Five to ten minutes between every subject for two goes a long way for you both. Don’t let them on electronics during this time! Make them be active. Run, climb a tree etc. Set a timer to make sure the break doesn’t go too long. That break is great to keep them from not getting fatigued, but also a good chance to sneak in a returned phone call or email. Again, the timer keeps you both on task.
Have a system for knowing what needs to be done. One mom says, “I keep all three sets of lesson plans out on my counter and cross off each one as they’re done. Some kids are self sufficient and I allow them to work on their own. Others are not and I have to work side by side. We have a place on the counter they put their completed assignments that need grading if I’m not working with them.”
Allow the kids breaks. Five to ten minutes between every subject or two goes a long way for you both. Don’t let them on electronics during this time! Make them be active. Run, climb a tree etc. Set a timer to make sure the break doesn’t go too long. That break is great to keep them from not getting fatigued, but also a good chance to sneak in a returned phone call or email. Again, the timer keeps you both on task.
Have a plan for electronics. This issue may be your biggest battle if you don’t have firm guidelines. You may choose to have no electronics during the school day, just like they are not allowed at school. You may choose to allow them during set breaks. Your call, but my suggestion would be to limit them as much as possible.
Keep chocolate on hand. Sometimes a Hersey’s Kiss does wonders when are patience is running thin. (I suppose for both kid and grown up)
Set aside an hour for quiet time in the afternoon. Make this a purposeful break from each other. Everyone goes to their own space. Encourage an hour of reading or other quiet activity. It’s their down time and can be your work time.
Brainstorm family projects that focus outward. Look for opportunities to serve neighbors, extended family, nursing home residents as quarantines and social distancing allow. Be creative.
The crockpot is your friend.
You have to be flexible. If you start to “lose” your child or become frustrated with each other take a break, double up on a different subject and work on that one later.
Encourage Romans 12:10. “Take delight in honoring each other’. Out-give one another. Show grace, give extra chances, share the last cookie, etc…
For parents who are trying to work at the same time:

Recognize can’t do both at the exact same time and do both well. Set aside work time vs school time. Get up early or stay up late. Do as much as possible so you have a good start on answering emails, sending out necessary reports, etc… so you can focus on the kids and school once they’re up.
Try to limit phone calls during school. The distraction gets kids off task and it’s so much harder to get them back at it.
Work on schoolwork in sections. Start with what they can do independently so you can set up, make calls, and try to plan your work day accordingly.
Don’t take your frustrations out on your kids. Often bad attitudes from them are a manifestation of your frustrations.
Finally, for everyone…

Make this an adventure. This season may last longer than we anticipate, but it won’t last forever. Choose joy over stress. Look for the good in the unanticipated time together. Relax. Do fun things. Laugh.


Big thank you to Jenny Daugherty, Stephanie King, and Elizabeth Heisey for your insight! I would love to hear what tips you would add! Comment below.

In Montessori education, teachers act as guides who facilitate learning. They show the link between the materials (work) and the child.

The teacher (guide) prepares the environment (classroom) for the students, gives lessons on the materials (work), and then allows the child to learn through meaningful work. The child is free to work throughout the classroom, while being provided safe boundaries by the teacher (guide).

"It is almost possible to say that there is a mathematical relationship between the beauty of their surroundings and the activity of the child." - Dr. Maria Montessori
Watching a young child learn mathematical concepts through hands-on Montessori works is fascinating. It's almost as though you can see their little brain working and the ideas connecting.
First, they use materials to learn (concrete) and eventually they are able to apply their learning to paper and real world situations (abstract). Their guide (the teacher) gently takes them through these steps, equipping the child with life long learning strategies.

Join use for an Open House. Thursday, March 19 @ 5:00-7:00pm. Life Academy works with children in 3k - First grade. Families are welcome. We are located at 2810 Wollmer St. in Manitowoc.

"The first essential for the child's development is concentration. The child who concentrates is immensely happy." - Dr. Maria Montessori

Step into the Life Academy classroom and you'll find students quietly working independently. Some work in teams, while others concentrate solely on their work. They are focused and determined. It's captivating.

The teachers act as guides and help when needed, allowing the child to explore their work and develop strategies to enhance their learning. Establishing these skills especially at the ages of 3-6 will set the child up for a lifetime of learning.

Join us for an Open House on Thursday, March 19 and experience the Montessori method yourself. Families, including children are welcome. 5:00-7:00pm. Life Academy is located at 2810 Wollmer St. in Manitowoc.

Life Academy

"The child can only develop fully by means of experience in his environment. We call such experience work." - Dr. Maria Montessori

Life Academy guides students through a series of works to allow the child to learn through practical, hands-on tools. Each child's experience is custom developed for their learning needs.

Join us for an Open House to experience Montessori yourself! Thursday, March 19 @ 5:00-7:00pm. 2810 Wollmer St. Manitowoc.

"The child can only develop fully by means of experience in his environment. We call such experience work." - Dr. Maria Montessori

Life Academy guides students through a series of works to allow the child to learn through practical, hands-on tools. Each child's experience is custom developed for their learning needs.

Join us for an Open House to experience Montessori yourself! Thursday, March 19 @ 5:00-7:00pm. 2810 Wollmer St. Manitowoc.

Life Academy's cover photo

Preschool through First grade Christian Montessori based classroom

Life Academy

Fun recess at LA.

churchleaders.com

10 Ways Parents Can Help Children Succeed Spiritually

churchleaders.com Parents want to see their children succeed academically. Socially. Financially. Athletically. These are all well and good, but the most important area a parent can help their child succeed is to help children succeed spiritually.

For the Life of Our Teens: Suicide in Focus
October 21, 2019

By Tony Perkins
Even now, his mom describes him as a typical kid. "He was a scout leader, an athlete, had a girlfriend, and led youth group at church." Talking about him in the past tense isn't easy. And for Julia, like so many hurting parents, it will never get easier. Her son Liam took his own life -- and even as a teacher with a degree in counseling, she never saw it coming.

Today, there are thousands of other moms and dads just like Julia, struggling to make sense of the loss. Looking back, some of the pieces fit together. Maybe he was too perfectionistic, she says now. He'd started struggling in some of his high school classes, and he was on medication that may have exacerbated his anxiety. Now, hoping other parents will be more vigilant, Julia warns about social media and how faith communities could do more to facilitate a discussion about kids' personal struggles.

That conversation was never more needed than now, as the CDC bowled people over with the news that teen suicide isn't just on the rise -- it's out of control. In the 10-year span between 2007-2017, the number of kids who took their own lives jumped 56 percent. Worse, no one seems to know what or who is responsible. Experts have speculated on everything from teenagers' time online to the glamorization of suicide on shows like Netflix's 13 Reasons Why. While no one can know for sure, Dr. Steve Grcevich, founder and president of Key Ministry, says there are things every family can monitor.

On Friday's "Washington Watch," he agreed it's a "complex situation." But, he went on, the structures that we've had in place to protect the emotionally vulnerable kids are also eroded. "When I look at this over the last 10 years," he told Sarah Perry, "there are three trends that I would identify that I think folks need to look at more closely. The first is smartphones. This propensity that kids have to negatively compare themselves to other people is a lot greater when you have access to Instagram and Snapchat." Dr. Grcevich just returned from a research meeting with the American Academy of Child Psychiatry where a new study was presented. It found that kids who spent three or more hours on their portable electronic devices were 60 percent more likely to develop depression than kids who use them for an hour a day or less.

The second concern he says parents should have is the "emphasis in our culture on sexual expression." It's no secret, he points out that "rates of suicidal thinking and behavior increased dramatically when teens start to violate sexual boundaries. When we're looking at data... teenagers who had sexual contact with a member of the same sex and or and opposite sex were 12 times more likely to require medical attention for a suicide attempt compared to those kids who weren't sexually active. When kids start crossing sexual boundaries," Dr. Grcevich warned, "that is oftentimes where we see these large spikes in suicidal behavior."

Finally, he urged, families need to be especially aware of the diminishing role of religion in the lives of our teens. He pointed to the Pew Foundation study that came out last week showing seven million fewer adult Christians in the United States that there were 10 years ago. That's a concern, he explained, since suicidal thinking and behavior is markedly lower for teens with parents "for whom faith was important." Today's millennials, he notes, "are the first generation of Americans in which Christians are in the minority. And I wouldn't doubt that the situation is even worse for those who are in generation Z."

So what should parents do? Well, Grcevich suggests, "One of the things that I would look at -- if my kids were of that age again -- they wouldn't be getting smartphones until they're well into high school." And only then, he followed up, it would be with "very close parental supervision." The second thing, he said, is an emphasis on faith. More research is starting to show that "kids who pray on a regular basis are significantly less likely to develop depression than kids in the general population."

"As a parent, one of the things that I would be trying to do is to cultivate the importance of faith in family life -- regularly praying together as a family, studying the Bible, [even] serving together. Because, interestingly enough, in the same study out of Virginia Tech, they didn't see [a big] relationship between church attendance, youth group participation and a decreased risk for suicide. It was only when the kids had internalized their faith and were practicing and on their own and truly had like a relationship with God that it seemed to offer protective value."

Tony Perkins's Washington Update is written with the aid of FRC senior writers.

dennisprager.com

What Do You Want Your Child to Be? - The Dennis Prager Show

dennisprager.com Ask any young person -- even a young child -- "What do you want to be?" and just about everyone will answer, "a doctor," "an engineer," "a teacher," "a

[10/02/19]   The Value Of Family Devotions
October 1, 2019 by The Disciplemaker Team

Won’t daily family devotions eventually become a meaningless ritual?
by Harriet Beecher Stowe

This article was originally published in issue 71 of the Discipleship Journal. It is a classic piece from Harriet Beecher Stowe, best known for her novel Uncle Tom’s Cabin.
“There must be a home religion,” said my wife.

“I believe in home religion,” said [our friend] Bob Stephens, “but not in the outward show of it. The best sort of religion is that which one keeps at the bottom of his heart, and which goes up thence quietly through all his actions, and not the kind that comes through a certain routine of forms and ceremonies. Do you suppose family prayers, now, and a blessing at meals, make people any better?”

“Depend upon it, Robert,” said my wife . . . “Of course I would have religion in the heart, and spreading quietly through the life; but does this interfere with those outward, daily acts of respect and duty which we owe to our Creator? It is too much the slang of our day to decry forms, and to exalt the excellency of the spirit in opposition to them; but tell me, are you satisfied with friendship that has none of the outward forms of friendship, or love that has none of the outward forms of love?”

“The trouble with all these things,” said Bob, “is that they get to be mere forms. I never could see that family worship amounted to much more in most families.”

“The outward expression of all good things is apt to degenerate into mere form,” said I. “The outward expression of social good feeling becomes a mere form; but for that reason must we meet each other like oxen? Not say, ‘Good morning,’ or ‘Good evening,’ or ‘I am happy to see you’? Must we never use any of the forms of mutual goodwill, except in those moments when we are excited by a real, present emotion? What would become of society?

“Forms are, so to speak, a [photograph] of a past good feeling, meant to take and keep the impression of it when it is gone. Our best and most inspired moments are crystallized in them; and even when the spirit that created them is gone, they help to bring it back.

“We see a man entering our door who is a weary bore, but we use with him those forms of civility which society prescribes, and feel far kinder to him than if we had shut the door in his face, and said, ‘Go along, you tiresome fellow!’ Now why does not this very obvious philosophy apply to better and higher feelings? The forms of religion are as much more necessary than the forms of politeness and social goodwill as religion is more important than all other things.”

“Besides,” said my wife, “a form of worship, kept up from year to year in a family—the assembling of parents and children for a few sacred moments each day, though it may be a form many times . . . often becomes invested with deep sacredness in times of trouble . . . In sickness, in bereavement, in separation, the daily prayer at home has a sacred and healing power. Then we remember the scattered and wandering ones; and the scattered and wandering think tenderly of that hour when they know they are remembered.
“I know, when I was a young girl, I was often thoughtless and careless about family prayers; but now that my father and mother are gone forever, there is nothing I recall more often. I remember the great old family Bible, the hymn book, the chair where father used to sit. I see him as he looked bending over that Bible more than in any other way; and expressions and sentences in his prayers which fell unheeded on my ears in those days have often come back to me like comforting angels.

“We are not aware of the influence things are having on us till we have left them far behind in years. When we have summered and wintered them, and look back on them from changed times and other days, we find that they were making their mark upon us, though we knew it not . . .”

“The hour of family devotion,” [I said,] “should be the children’s hour—held dear as the interval when the busy father drops his business and cares, and, like Jesus of old, takes the little ones in his arms and blesses them. The child should remember it as the time when the father always seemed most accessible and loving . . . If the spirit of love rules the family hour, it may prove the source and spring of all that is good through the day.
It seems to be a solemn duty in the parents thus to make the Invisible Fatherhood real to their children, who can receive this idea at first only through outward forms and observances. The little one thus learns that his father has a Father in heaven, and that the earthly life he is living is only a sacrament and emblem—a type of the eternal life which infolds it, and of more lasting relations there.

“Home ought to be so religiously cheerful, so penetrated by the life of love and hope and Christian faith, that the other world may be made real by it . . . Our home should be so sanctified, its joys and its sorrows so baptized and hallowed, that it shall not be sacreligious to think of Heaven as a higher form of the same thing—a Father’s house in the better country, whose mansions are many, whose love is perfect, whose joy is eternal.”
________________________________________
Harriet Beecher Stowe (1811–1896) is perhaps best known for her novel Uncle Tom’s Cabin. Her portrayal of slavery in the book fired abolitionist sentiment in the decade before the Civil War. Raised in a deeply religious family, Stowe’s father, husband, and five of her brothers were ministers, and she herself wrote on a wide array of spiritual and social issues. Beginning at the age of forty, she produced thirty-one books in as many years. This excerpt is from House and Home Papers (1865), which was written as a fictional first-person narrative under the pseudonymn Christopher Crowfield.

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Our Curriculum: Christian Montessori Model for preschool-1st grade. Dynamic Learning Activities to capture student interest. Customized and Flexible Lessons according to what each student needs to learn. Life Academy provides an engaging learning experience, utilizing creative teaching methods. Students are guided through their coursework in a way that will ignite a lifelong passion to learn and pursue the truth. Partnering with you to see Christ fully formed in our students...

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2810 Wollmer St
Manitowoc, WI
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