Burke High School

Burke High School in existence since 1910. Located in downtown Charleston, SC. Home of the mighty Bulldogs. Built Burke Tough.

Operating as usual

06/10/2021

Performing live In concert rising R&B sensation Demi Lo at the Burke high school performing arts center Tuesday June 16th 2:30pm this concert is free of charge to all Bulldogs for the hard work & sacrifice that you put in through the school year enjoy💪🏾💯❤️

Performing live In concert rising R&B sensation Demi Lo at the Burke high school performing arts center Tuesday June 16th 2:30pm this concert is free of charge to all Bulldogs for the hard work & sacrifice that you put in through the school year enjoy💪🏾💯❤️

02/01/2021

Rev. John L. Dart (1854-1915)

Born in Charleston in 1854 as a free black man, Dart spent his life as a champion of change and civil rights.

An educated man, Dart understood the economic and racial stratification of the time and believed education was a way to empower area blacks.

Valedictorian of his 1872 graduating class at Avery Institute, Dart went on to receive a master’s degree and became an ordained Baptist minister. He served as pastor of Morris Street Baptist Church for 16 years and at Shiloh Baptist Church for 10 years.

Dart founded the Charleston Normal and Industrial School because the area’s black schools were overcrowded, but he strongly believed the city of Charleston should pay for the education of black children, just as it did for whites. Dart worked to convince city officials, and in 1911, the city began to fund the school, which became the basis for Burke Industrial School and the current-day Burke High School.

Although Dart died in 1915, the legacy of this distinguished educator, religious leader and philanthropist continues today at the John L. Dart Branch of the Charleston County Public Library system.

In 1894, Reverend John L. Dart, a graduate of the Avery Normal Institute and Atlanta University opened the Charleston Industrial Institute (later known as the Charleston Colored Industrial School and eventually Burke Industrial School in 1921) on the corner of Bogard and Kracke Streets in downtown Charleston.

The original school building, Dart Hall, accommodated approximately 150 male and female students. As the student population grew, Reverend Dart organized the construction of additional buildings on the small campus.

Dart envisioned the mission of this long overdue free public school as an institution of vocational and moral education.

As his original prospectus read: "In view of the startling fact that there are more than 5,000 colored children in Charleston without free public school advantages, and knowing that the many boys and girls who are now growing up in ignorance, idleness and crime must become, in future, a large criminal and dependent class, a number of the leading and progressive colored men of this city undertook the work of establishing a school for colored children, where they could be taught not only reading and writing, but the lessons of morals, temperance, sewing, cooking, nursing, housework, carpentering, etc."

Based on this prospectus, the Charleston Colored Industrial School sought to educate African American students with technical skills that would help them secure gainful employment in the local economy. The intended curriculum mirrored the vocational or industrial structure encouraged by many white leaders that sought to shape black educational policy during the post-war period and into the early twentieth century.

African American leaders such as Booker T. Washington were also prominent advocates for this industrial labor focus in black education. As a former slave, Washington endorsed the notion that African Americans could gain racial equality in the United States through gradual economic mobility.
Washington and his supporters argued that vocational training assisted in this endeavor better than a classical education curriculum. Schools like Reverend Dart’s Charleston Industrial School mirrored Washington’s philosophy by providing courses that emphasized technical skills, strong work ethic, and moral character development.

These vocational education goals for African Americans generated controversy within black communities. Though the school was established through the initiatives of black Charlestonians, there were concerns that the school's industrial focus was a strategy for white elites to develop a subservient black class trained in manual labor once institutionalized slavery had ended.

They believed that a professional and college preparatory curriculum better served African Americans by generating racial uplift and social, economic, and political equality.

Reverend Dart initially gained funding for Charleston Industrial School through local private donors and northern philanthropists.

For years, he regularly petitioned the city of Charleston to assume responsibilities for the school. The city government finally responded in 1911 by constructing a new building at the school’s present location at the corner of Fishburne and President Streets. Once the Charleston Industrial School operated as a public school, city officials enforced an ordinance that only white teachers could be employed to teach in coveted city school positions.

Even though the industrial school was a segregated black school, African American teachers from Charleston had to find work in private institutions, or in rural African American public schools outside of the city.

In 1919, local activists successfully petitioned to overturn the ordinance, and only black teachers could join the faculty of black public schools in Charleston, until the city desegregated its public school system in the 1960s.

In 1921, the school district changed the name of the Charleston Colored Industrial School to Burke Industrial School, in memory of the death of city board member James E. Burke.

Rev. John L. Dart (1854-1915)

Born in Charleston in 1854 as a free black man, Dart spent his life as a champion of change and civil rights.

An educated man, Dart understood the economic and racial stratification of the time and believed education was a way to empower area blacks.

Valedictorian of his 1872 graduating class at Avery Institute, Dart went on to receive a master’s degree and became an ordained Baptist minister. He served as pastor of Morris Street Baptist Church for 16 years and at Shiloh Baptist Church for 10 years.

Dart founded the Charleston Normal and Industrial School because the area’s black schools were overcrowded, but he strongly believed the city of Charleston should pay for the education of black children, just as it did for whites. Dart worked to convince city officials, and in 1911, the city began to fund the school, which became the basis for Burke Industrial School and the current-day Burke High School.

Although Dart died in 1915, the legacy of this distinguished educator, religious leader and philanthropist continues today at the John L. Dart Branch of the Charleston County Public Library system.

In 1894, Reverend John L. Dart, a graduate of the Avery Normal Institute and Atlanta University opened the Charleston Industrial Institute (later known as the Charleston Colored Industrial School and eventually Burke Industrial School in 1921) on the corner of Bogard and Kracke Streets in downtown Charleston.

The original school building, Dart Hall, accommodated approximately 150 male and female students. As the student population grew, Reverend Dart organized the construction of additional buildings on the small campus.

Dart envisioned the mission of this long overdue free public school as an institution of vocational and moral education.

As his original prospectus read: "In view of the startling fact that there are more than 5,000 colored children in Charleston without free public school advantages, and knowing that the many boys and girls who are now growing up in ignorance, idleness and crime must become, in future, a large criminal and dependent class, a number of the leading and progressive colored men of this city undertook the work of establishing a school for colored children, where they could be taught not only reading and writing, but the lessons of morals, temperance, sewing, cooking, nursing, housework, carpentering, etc."

Based on this prospectus, the Charleston Colored Industrial School sought to educate African American students with technical skills that would help them secure gainful employment in the local economy. The intended curriculum mirrored the vocational or industrial structure encouraged by many white leaders that sought to shape black educational policy during the post-war period and into the early twentieth century.

African American leaders such as Booker T. Washington were also prominent advocates for this industrial labor focus in black education. As a former slave, Washington endorsed the notion that African Americans could gain racial equality in the United States through gradual economic mobility.
Washington and his supporters argued that vocational training assisted in this endeavor better than a classical education curriculum. Schools like Reverend Dart’s Charleston Industrial School mirrored Washington’s philosophy by providing courses that emphasized technical skills, strong work ethic, and moral character development.

These vocational education goals for African Americans generated controversy within black communities. Though the school was established through the initiatives of black Charlestonians, there were concerns that the school's industrial focus was a strategy for white elites to develop a subservient black class trained in manual labor once institutionalized slavery had ended.

They believed that a professional and college preparatory curriculum better served African Americans by generating racial uplift and social, economic, and political equality.

Reverend Dart initially gained funding for Charleston Industrial School through local private donors and northern philanthropists.

For years, he regularly petitioned the city of Charleston to assume responsibilities for the school. The city government finally responded in 1911 by constructing a new building at the school’s present location at the corner of Fishburne and President Streets. Once the Charleston Industrial School operated as a public school, city officials enforced an ordinance that only white teachers could be employed to teach in coveted city school positions.

Even though the industrial school was a segregated black school, African American teachers from Charleston had to find work in private institutions, or in rural African American public schools outside of the city.

In 1919, local activists successfully petitioned to overturn the ordinance, and only black teachers could join the faculty of black public schools in Charleston, until the city desegregated its public school system in the 1960s.

In 1921, the school district changed the name of the Charleston Colored Industrial School to Burke Industrial School, in memory of the death of city board member James E. Burke.

postandcourier.com 09/18/2016

Burke’s Tyzell Richardson balances passion for tennis and music

postandcourier.com Tyzell Richardson is a multi-talented teenager. He often has to choose between his favorite muscial instrument and his favorite sport.

westedgecharleston.com 06/03/2015

The WestEdge

westedgecharleston.com WestEdge is a vibrant community of working & living places and shopping & dining destinations designed to inspire and enrich the minds and bodies of its people, so that they can, in turn, inspire and enrich others.

[05/12/15]   Burke High School Alumni, I'm trying to recruit some people with some marketable skills to share their knowledge with some students at Burke High School. Barbers, plumbers, brick masons, lawyers, doctors, computer programmers etc. Please contact me at [email protected] or just reply in this thread. Each one, teach one.

[03/05/15]   State Championship tip off is 3/7 @ 12:30pm. Come out sporting your blue and white and show your support.

Location

Category

Telephone

Address


244 President St
Charleston, SC
29403
Other High Schools in Charleston (show all)
CCSD Early College High School CCSD Early College High School
66 Columbus Street
Charleston, 29403

ECHS is a nontraditional high school in Charleston, SC, designed to allow students the opportunity to complete up to two years of college credit while earning a high school diploma.

West Ashley High School West Ashley High School
4060 Wildcat Blvd
Charleston, 29414-5851

West Ashley High School PTSO West Ashley High School PTSO
4060 Wildcat Blvd
Charleston, 29414

PTSO stands for Parent Teacher Student Organization. Our goal is to support WAHS Families, Teachers and staff with as many opportunities as possible.

Burke High School Athletics Burke High School Athletics
244 President St
Charleston, 29403

Welcome to the official Athletic Page of Burke High School! Follow all of the Athletic teams as we embark on a new school year!

James Island Charter High James Island Charter High
1000 Fort Johnson Rd
Charleston, 29412

West Ashley High School West Ashley High School
4060 West Wildcat Boulevard
Charleston, 29414

WAHS MISSION: to experience, to embrace, to educate, to encourage, to empower.

Carolina Invitational Carolina Invitational
Charleston

High school basketball tournament that takes place in Charleston, SC December 27-30. 2021 field will consist of 64 varsity girls, 16 varsity boys 8 JV Boys and 8 JV Girls teams from across the country.

Porter-Gaud School Porter-Gaud School
Charleston, 29407-7524

Allegro Charter School of Music Allegro Charter School of Music
2731 Gordon Street
Charleston, 29405

West Ashley High School Chorus West Ashley High School Chorus
4060 Wildcat Blvd
Charleston, 29414

This is a group for any WAHS chorus member and friends! Send this link to all! Be sure to check back for updates as well.

Burke High School Burke High School
244 President Street
Charleston, 29403

The Official Page of Burke High School. Burke High School's mission is to create lifelong learners so that upon graduation, students will be able to become successful members of society.

Charleston County School of the Arts Charleston County School of the Arts
5109 W Enterprise St
Charleston, 29405-4066