Amity Language Institute LEARN Japanese

Amity Language Institute LEARN Japanese

Comments

HELLO ALL! FOLLOW NIHONGOMAX ON FACEBOOK AND NIHONGOMAX04 ON INSTAGRAM AND NEVER MISS ANY CHANCE OF LEARNING JAPANESE! LET'S MAKE LEARNING EASY!
This video has somehow been popular, so I will share it with you, too! このビデオ、なぜか学校で評判がいいので、シェアしておきます。
I wonder why some foreigners like to see only bright sides of Japan. And why some foreigners like to see only its horrible sides. This may happen to any country but it seems extreme. どうして一部の外国の方々は日本のいい面ばかりみたがるのでしょう。そして別の外国の方々はひどい面ばかり見たがるのでしょう。どの国にもあることなのでしょうが、極端です。

Amity Language Institute was created in 2005 in the hope of building friendly relations between people of all nationalities. Our mission is to promote cultural exchange through Japanese language instruction.

Amity Language Institute

Operating as usual

*******************************************************
THE KATAKANA THAT DISAPPEARED / 消えた片仮名
******************************************************
Contents

1. A katakana that disappeared
2. What is “ヴ”?
3. Words with “va” “vi” “vu” “ve” “vo”
4. A change in the spelling system
5. The transition of “v” to “b”
6. The remains of the old spelling
7. MoFA and the katakana that disappeared
8. “ヴ” can be very important to some
9. “ヴ” in today’s Japanese

*ルビなし和訳付き / Japanese translation without Ruby is attached on the bottom of this post. Currently we are working on the Ruby.
***********************************
1. A katakana that disappeared

From April 1, 2019, the character “ヴ (pronounced “vu”)” in foreign country names disappeared from official documents of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs (MoFA).
You may have seen the katakana “ウ” (“u”), but did you know another katakana, “ヴ”?

2. What Is “ヴ”?

“ヴ” is a katakana created near the end of the Edo Era.
At that time, the Japanese people had re-discovered Western culture. It was a huge collection of information, and much of it had not been available to them through the meager communication with Holland allowed by the Tokugawa Shogunate.
As the Japanese tried to learn about and from the West, they found that many Western words contained “v” whose sound didn’t exist in Japanese then.
Therefore, Fukuzawa Yukichi, an educator, proposed to use new characters “ヷ”, “ヸ”, “ヴ”, “ヹ”, “ヺ”, to express “va”, “vi”, “vu”, “ve”, and “vo” respectively. He just added two very short lines on the top right of existing katakana, “ワ (pronounced “wa”)”, “ヰ (pronounced “i” today)”, “ウ (“u”)”, “ヱ (pronounced “e” today)” and “ヲ (“o” or “wo”)”.
That is how “ヴ (vu)” was born.

3. Words with “va” “vi” “vu” “ve” “vo”

Well known examples with these characters include:
- ヷイマール (Vaimaaru for Weimar)
- ヸオロン (vioron for violin in French)
- ヴロンスキー (Vuronskii for Vronsky in “Anna Karenina”)
- 『ヹニスの商人』 (“Venisu no shoonin” for “Merchant of Venice”)
- ヺルガ (Voruga for the Volga, the longest river in Russia)

4. A change in the spelling system

After WWII, there was a big education reform in Japan. In 1947, new spelling rules were enforced and as a result, “ヷ”, “ヸ”, “ヹ” and “ヺ” went out of use.
As for “ヴ”, it stayed, but it was used in a different way.
In the new spelling system, “ヴ” had two pronunciations. When we read it alone, we pronounced it “vu”. However, if we saw it followed by another character such as “ァ (“a”)”, “ィ (“i”), “ェ (“e”)”, “ォ (“o”)”, or “ュ (“yu”)”, it stood for “v” and as a combination we read it “ヴァ (“va”)”, “ヴィ (“vi”)”, “ヴェ (“ve”)”, “ヴォ (“vo”)” and “ヴュ (“vyu”)” as one mora. 

5. The transition of “v” to “b”

During the subsequent decades, the Japanese borrowed a huge number of words from English and began to use them in everyday life.
Some words were spelled with “ヴ” such as in “テレヴィジョン (“terevijon” for television)”. However, the use of “バ (“ba”)”, “ビ” (“bi”), “ブ (“bu”), “ベ (“be”)”, “ボ (“bo”)” in place of “ヴァ (“va”), “ヴィ (“vi”)”, “ヴ (“vu”)”, “ヴェ (“ve”)”, “ヴォ (“vo”)” has become increasingly common.
With the “b” sound, we feel that the word has truly become a part of Japanese. Now we call a TV set “テレビ” only.
Other such examples:
- バニラ (“banira” for vanilla)
- ビニール (“biniiru” for vinyl)
- ソビエト (“sobieto” for Soviet)
- ラブレター (“labu-retaa” for love-letter)
- エレベーター(“erebeetaa” for elevator)
- ボランティア(“borantia” for volunteer)

6. The remains of the old spelling

Even today, there are a lot of inconsistencies in the spelling of loan words. It seems some old spellings still remain.
With regard to some words borrowed or transcribed from German, Russian, etc.:
- We often spell “va” as “ワ”. Example: ワイマール (“Waimaaru” for Weimar), ワルシャワ (“Warushawa” for Warsaw), モスクワ (“Mosukuwa” for Moskva, meaning Moscow), ワルワーラ (“Waruwaara” for Varvara, a woman’s name), ワクチン (“wakuchin” for vaccine)
- We sometimes spell “v” at the beginning of a word as “ウ (“u”)”. Example: ウラジミール (“Urajimiiru” for Vladimir)
- There is an example to spell “vo” as “オ (“o”)”: ウラジオストック (“Urajiosutokku” for Vladivostok)
It seems that words such as the old “ヴァイマール”, “ヷルヷーラ”, “ヴラジヺストック” had been so popular that even after the spelling reform of 1946 people kept using the same characters without the short lines. They could still recognize the meaning easily.
We hope to keep looking for information on the transition in spelling of loan words.

7. MoFA and the katakana that disappeared

After WWII, the MoFA tried to spell the names of foreign places as closely to the original pronunciation, or sometimes English pronunciation, as possible.
Naturally, they frequently used “ヴ (“v” or “vu”)” in the new spelling system.
However, no name with “ヴ” became truly popular. People always called Vietnam “ベトナム” (Betonamu) and never “ヴェトナム (Vetonamu)”.
About the year 2000, finally, the MoFA began to discuss the use of country names that Japanese citizens would understand easily and could adopt in their lives. They researched dictionaries and books that people frequently referred to, and found out “ヴ” was actually very little used.
So, they replaced “ヴァ (“va”)”, “ヴィ (“vi”)” , “ヴ (“v”)” , “ヴェ (“ve”)” and “ヴォ (“vo”)” with “バ (“ba”)”, “ビ (“bi”)”, “ブ (“bu”)”, “ベ (“be”)” and “ボ (“bo”)”, one by one, in their official documents.
As a result, as of March 31, 2019, there were finally only two countries whose names contain “ヴ”. They were St. Christopher Navis and Cabo Verde. From tomorrow, in the MoFA websites, they will appear as “セントクリストファー・ネービス (Sento Kurisutofaa Neebisu)” and “カーボベルデ (Kaabo Berude)”.
[On April 2, 2019, we confirmed the changes on their websites.]

8. “ヴ ” is very important to some

On the other hand, some people received the news of the MoFA’s spelling policy change with dismay.
Among them were fans of the popular animation “ヱヴァンゲリヲン(“Evangerion”) and the professional basketball team “熊本ヴォルターズ (“Kumamoto Volters”)”. They feared that their beloved animation and the team had to change the names to plain “エバンゲリオン (“Ebangerion”)” and “ボルターズ (“Boltaazu”)” with the commonplace “b” sound. Some even inquired to NHK (Japan’s National Broadcasting Corporation) and National Institute for Japanese Language about it.
Of course, the use of “ヴ” outside the MoFA will be intact.

9. “ヴ” in today’s Japanese

In today’s Japanese, we often see “ヴ” in words when their foreign origin is stressed.
Examples:
- ヴィネグレット (vineguretto for vinaigrette)
- ルイ・ヴィトン (Rui Viton for Louis Vuitton)
- オーボンヴュータン (Oobonvyuutan or Au Bon Vieux Temps, a pastry shop in Tokyo)
- ヴェネツィア (Venezia or Venice)
- ヴォーグ (Vogue, the magazine)
However, in reading these words, we unconsciously change the “v” to “b”. In other words, we actually say “bineguretto”, “Biton” and so on. The “v” sound is so unfamiliar that even today people refer to the alphabet “V” as “bui (pronounced like “buoy”)”.
Then, why use “ヴ”?
If someone uses “ヴ”, the speaker could sound more cultivated; the thing could look more beautiful or expensive; or they could impress some young people or some people who yearn for the foreign culture.
Looking back at its history, Japan has always respected foreign-born things. Even the people were not very interested in speaking a foreign language, they have always cherished using loan words.
It seems that “ヴ” reflects our such attitude as that.
[The end of the English post]

************************************************************
目次

1. 消えた片仮名
2. “ヴ” とは?
3. ヷ行の言葉
4. 仮名遣いの変化
5. バ行 への置き換え
6. 旧仮名遣いの名残
7. 外務省と消えた片仮名
8. 「ヴ」が大切な人々も
9. 現代の日本語と「ヴ」
****************************************
1.消えた片仮名

2019年4月1日より、片仮名「ヴ (“vu” と読む)」が外務省の文書の外国名からなくなりました。
かたかなの「ウ」は見たことがあると思いますが、「ヴ」って、見たことありますか?

2. “ヴ” とは?

「ヴ」は江戸時代末期に創られた片仮名です。
当時、日本人は西洋文化を再発見したところでした。そこには、幕府に制限されたオランダとの関係からは得られなかった、膨大な量の情報があったのです。
日本人は西洋について、そして西洋から学ぶ過程で、西洋の言葉には当時の日本語にはなかった音を表す “v” がたくさんあるのに気づきました。
そのため、福沢諭吉という教育者が既存の片仮名「ワ」「ヰ」「ウ」「ヱ」「ヲ」の右肩に短い線を二つ付けて、「ヷ (vaと読む、以下同じ)」「ヸ (vi)」「ヴ (vu)」「ヹ (ve)」「ヺ (vo)」という新しい文字で “v” の音を表すことを提唱しました。
それが、今日使われている「ヴ」の始まりです。

3. ヷ行の言葉

下は、これらの文字のよく知られた用例です。
- ヷイマール (Vaimaaru、Weimar のこと)
- ヸオロン (Vioron、フランス語でバイオリン violon のこと)
- ヴロンスキー (『アンナ・カレーニナ』の登場人物Vuronskii、Vronskyのこと)
- ヹニスの商人 (『Venisu のしょうにん』、“Merchant of Venice” のこと)
- ヺルガ (Voruga、ロシアの大河 Volga のこと)

4. 仮名遣いの変化

第二次世界大戦後、日本で大きな教育改革がありました。1947年に、新しい仮名遣いの規則が発効し、「ヷ」「ヸ」「ヹ」「ヺ」は使われなくなりました。
「ヴ」は残りましたが、違う使い方になりました。
それによれば、「ヴ」は発音が二つあります。「ヴ」の字だけを読むときは、”vu” と読みます。しかし、「ァ」「ィ」「ェ」「ォ」「ュ」など他の字が後につくときは、ただ “v” を表し、それらの字と併せてセットにして、それぞれ「ヴァ (va)」「ヴィ (vi)」「ヴェ (ve)」「ヴォ (vo)」「ヴュ (vyu)」とモーラひとつ分として読むのです。

5. バ行への置き換え

続く20世紀後半、日本人は英語から膨大な数の言葉を借用するようになりました。
“V” があって「テレヴィジョン」のように「ヴ」を使う言葉もありましたが、そのうち「バ」「ビ」「ブ」「ベ」「ボ」が「ヴァ」「ヴィ」「ヴ」「ヴェ」「ヴォ」にとって代わることが多くなりました。
バ行の音になっていると、その言葉は日本語に馴染んだ感じがします。現在は「テレビ」と書きますし、他にも、たくさんの例があります。
- バニラ (vanilla)
- ビニール (vinyl)
- ソビエト (Soviet)
- ラブレター (love-letter)
- エレベーター (elevator)
- ボランティア (volunteer)

6. 旧仮名遣いの名残

現在でも、外来語の書き方には一貫性がありません。中には、旧仮名遣いも残っているようです。
ドイツ語、ロシア語などから入ってきた言葉は、今でも、
- “va” を「ワ」と書くことがあります。例:ワイマール (Weimar)、ワルシャワ (Warsaw)、モスクワ (Moscow)、ワルワーラ (Varvara、女性の名前)、ワクチン (vaccine)
- 語頭の “v” を「ウ」と書くことがあります。例:ウラジミール (Vladimir)
- 語頭の “vo” を「オ」とする例があります。例:ウラジオストック (Vladivostok)
昔の「ヷイマール」「ヷルヷーラ」「ヴラジヺストック」などが日本語に非常に馴染んでいて、1946の仮名遣い改定後も、点々を落としたままで使い続けたように思えるのです。濁点なしでも意味は通りますし。
この間の状況については、今後も興味を持っていたいと思います。

7. 外務省と消えた片仮名

第二次世界大戦後、外務省はできるだけ原音または英語に近い音で外国の地名を表記しようとしました。
当然、新しい仮名遣いによる「ヴ」も多用しました。
しかし、「ヴ」のついた国名は日本人の生活には定着しませんでした。私たちにとってはベトナムはいつも「ベトナム」で、「ヴィエトナム」ではなかった。
西暦2000年ごろ、外務省はやっと国民に分かりやすく、日常生活になじみやすい国名表記を検討し始めました。職員が辞書や参考文献をいろいろ調べてみると、「ヴ」はほとんど使われていませんでした。
そこで、外務省の文書では「ヴァ」「ヴィ」「ヴ」「ヴェ」「ヴォ」が少しずつバ行へと変更され、その結果、2019年3月31日の時点で、「ヴ」の残っている国名は二つだけとなっていました。
それが、写真のセントクリストファー・ネーヴィスとカーボヴェルデなのです。
4月1日から、これらの国名は「セントクリストファー・ネービス」 と「カーボベルデ」と書かれることになりました。
[2019年4月2日外務省のウエブサイトで改訂を確認しました。]

8.「ヴ」が大切な人々も

一方、外務省の仮名遣い変更のニュースに落胆した人々もいました。
アニメ「エヴァンゲリヲン」やプロバスケットボールチーム「熊本ヴォルターズ」のファンなどは、今後愛するアニメや贔屓のチームの名前がただのバ行の「エバンゲリオン」「熊本ボルターズ」になるのかと心配しました。NHKや国立国語研究所に問い合わせた人もいるそうです。
もちろん外務省とは関係なく、「ヴ」の一般的な使用はこれからも続くでしょう。

9.現代の日本語と「ヴ」

現代の日本語で、「ヴ」の付いた言葉は、特に以下の例のように外国の出自をはっきりさせる時によく見かけます。
- ヴィネグレット (vinaigrette)
- ルイ・ヴィトン (Louis Vuitton)
- オーボンヴュータン (Au Bon Vieux Temps, 東京の有名なパティスリー)
- ヴェネツィア (Venezia)
- ヴォーグ (Vogue、雑誌の名前)
しかし、これらの言葉も、話すときは無意識に “v” を “b” に読み替えています。つまり、「ビネグレット」「ビトン」などと言うし、アルファベットの “V” も、「ブイ」と読みます。
それなら、なぜあえて「ヴ」を使うのか?
「ヴ」を使うと、発信者に教養があるように見えたり、言葉の表すものがより素晴らしく、または高級そうに見えたり、若い人や外国文化に憧れる人々の一部に訴える可能性があったりするためです。
昔から、日本では外国から渡来したものを珍重し、外国語を話すことにはあまり興味がなくても、外来語を大切にしてきました。
「ヴ」は、私たちのそのような感覚を反映しているようです。
[和文部終わり]

Tea Olive (Osmanthus Fragrans) / ぎんもくせい

http://learnjapanesewithyuko.com/observations/osmanthus-fragrans/
This is written in English and Japanese. Japanese is Rubied for those who would like to learn Chinese characters!

Charleston is abundant with Osmanthus Fragrans trees. It is a cousin of the Kin-Mokusei trees which are very popular in Japan today.

*******************************************************************
Tea Olive (Osmanthus Fragrans) / ぎんもくせい (In the next post, we will put a link to our blog with the Japanese translation with Ruby)
*******************************************************************
Contents
1. Flower scent
2. Tea Olive (Osmanthus Fragrans)
3. Ghin-Mokusei (Osmanthus Fragrans)
4. Kin-Mokusei (Osmanthus Fragrans var. aurantiacus)
5. Osmanthus Tea
6. Ghin-Mokusei (Osmanthus Fragrans) and Kin-Mokusei (Osmanthus Fragrans var. aurantiacus)

1. Flower Scent

Fall came earlier than usual.
When I was taking a walk, something reminded me of the feeling of early fall in Charleston.
I stopped in the middle of the way and looked around.
A nostalgic, sweet flower smell like ripe peach and gardenia was in the warm, humid air.
But I couldn’t tell where the flowers were just by looking around.
I could perceive this scent in many parts of the city; on the path through the fields, in residential areas, in parking lots.
What was it? I was very interested in the first fall after my moving.
I asked my neighbors and posted a photo of a “suspicious” tree on Facebook, where an old student identified it for me. He used one of his “apps”, I had never been so impressed by modern technology.
One name for the tree is Tea Olive

2. Tea Olive (Osmanthus Fragrans)

Tea Olive trees can be of a person’s height or can reach the roof of a house, and the shape of the tree is varied, but in general, they look rather inconspicuous.
Also, the flowers look like someone tore up white, crumpled crape myrtle flowers, and inserted each piece between the leaves and a branch. You hardly see them from afar.
However, the tree is very “vocal”.
When I walk in town thinking about something, suddenly I feel a blanket of fragrance thrown over me.
Surprised, I look around. It is a Tea Olive tree standing in someone’s yard, and it can be ten meters (thirty feet) behind me.
It feels as if it were saying,
“Hey, I say ‘hello!’”
and it makes me smile.

3. Ghin-Mokusei (Osmanthus Fragrans)

Tea Olive is translated as “Ghin-Mokusei” or “Mokusei” in Japanese. “Ghin” means silver, and “Mokusei” is the name for its family and its genus. It seems that trees of this kind, if not exactly the same as Tea Olive, have existed in Japan for a long time.
The Ghin-Mokusei has the same Latin name as Tea Olive, and its lowers symbolize “Integrity” which derives from the image of pure white flowers.
As I was looking around on the Internet, I found a Japanese business running several care facilities and group homes for the elderly needing nursing service, whose name is “Gin-Mokusei”.
It was a little unexpected but “Gin-Mokusei” is a good name.
“Ghin (silver)” can be a poetic way of describing gray hair.
Its elegant sweet odor is very charming, so people of all ages would be happy to liken themselves to it.

4. Kin-Mokusei (Osmanthus Fragrans var. aurantiacus)

In today’s Japan, however, it is its variety, Osmanthus Fragrans var. aurantiacus (fragrant orange-colored olive) which is popular. We often see them in people’s gardens and parks.
We will refer to it as “Kin-Mokusei”, the shorter Japanese name. “Kin” means “gold”.
It came to Japan from China during the Edo Era (1603-1868).
Its flowers contain carotenoid which explains the orange color.
Since the fragrance of Kin-Mokusei is so powerful, it is dubbed “Ku-ri koo (9 ri or very far-reaching fragrance)”.
Taking advantage of the strong sweet scent, people used to plant Kin-Mokusei near their bathrooms when there were no or few flushing toilets. Probably based on that tradition, chemically composed Kin-Mokusei-scented deodorant for the bathroom was very popular when I was small.
Also, some temples and shrines have planted them believing that the fragrance deters evil spirit.

5. Osmanthus Tea

In China and Taiwan, they also love Kin-Mokusei’s fragrance. They infuse its scent in tea and liquor, they make candy of the flowers, and I have seen on YouTube a bowl of shaved ice with Kin-Mokusei flavored syrup on it!
“Keika-cha” is the word for tea scented with any flower of the genus Osmanthus, and you can make keika-cha at home with fresh flowers.
According to a recipe, you pick the flowers which are about to open (when their scent is at its height) and mix them with green tea or lightly fermented black or Oolong tea. Use two parts of tea for every one part of the flowers. Pour very hot water (90 degrees Celsius or 195 degrees Fahrenheit) over the mixture and enjoy.

6. Ghin-Mokusei and Kin-Mokusei

In Japan, it is said that Kin-Mokusei smells stronger than Ghin-Mokusei.
However, the odor of Charleston’s Ghin-Mokusei spreads so widely that I was a little doubtful. I could find no testimony from Japan of someone who actually smelled both flowers.
Fortunately, I found an interesting website of a nursery in Georgia, USA, where they grow both Ghin-Mokusei and Kin-Mokusei for sale.
And the people have actually smelled both.
The strength of the odor was not mentioned, but according to them, the smells are subtly different and Kin-Mokusei has a stronger sweet element.
I will be interested in growing Kin-mokusei in the future, because it will be as beautiful and it seems they consider its scent more Asian.
But first things first; two years ago, we planted a small Ghin-Mokusei or Tea Olive like our neighbors.
I hope it grows healthily and begins to “talk (smell profusely)” with its scent in our yard.
And one day, I may be able to make Osmanthus Tea.

*************
ぎんもくせい
*************
目次
1. 花の香り
2. ティー・オリーブ
3. ぎんもくせい
4. きんもくせい
5. 桂花茶
6. ぎんもくせいときんもくせい

1. 花の香り

例年より秋の訪れが早かったチャールストンです。
散歩していて、チャールストンの初秋の感覚を思い出しました。
道の真ん中でとつぜん立ち止まり、きょろきょろと四方を見回してしまったのです。
熟した桃のような、くちなしのような、なつかしい甘い花の香りが、雨上がりの、温かい湿気の中に漂っています。
でも、ちょっと見回しただけでは、どこにその花が咲いているのかわかりません。
この匂いが、散歩道や住宅街、駐車場など街のあちこちに流れます。
引っ越してきたとき、とても興味を持ちました。
近所の人に聞いたり、それらしい木の写真をフェースブックに投稿して昔の生徒さんに調べてもらったりした末に、やっとわかりました。その生徒さんはあるアプリを使って見つけてくれたのです。現代のテクノロジーはすごいですね。
その木は、チャールストンでは「ティー・オリーブ」などと呼ばれています。

2. ティー・オリーブ

ティー・オリーブの木は、人の背丈ぐらいとか、家の軒ぐらいとか、高さも、形もいろいろですが、あまり目立たない雑木に見えます。
花も、白い百日紅のくしゃくしゃの花をちぎって、葉の間にちょこんちょこんと差し込んでいったような感じ。遠目には見えないほどの小ささです。
ところが、どの木もとても「雄弁」です。
というのは、考え事をしながら歩いていても、ふわっと毛布がかぶさったように暖かい、いい匂いがしてきます。
びっくりして見回すと、10メートルぐらい後方にティー・オリーブの木があった、ということがよくあるのです。
それが、
「ねえ、こんにちはってば!」
と言っているようで、ついにこにこしてしまいます。

3. ぎんもくせい

ティー・オリーブは、日本語では「ぎんもくせい (銀木犀)」「もくせい (木犀)」。全く同じではないかもしれませんが、この種の木は日本には昔からあったようです。
現代のぎんもくせいはティー・オリーブと同じラテン名で、花言葉はその純白の花のイメージから「高潔」。
インターネットでいろいろ見ていたら、「ぎんもくせい」という日本の介護サービスつき高齢者向け居住施設ビジネスが出てきました。
ちょっと驚きましたが、考えてみれば、「ぎんもくせい」はなかなかよいネーミングです。
銀は、白髪の詩的な言い方でもあります。
優雅な芳香で愛される木、どんな年齢の人でもあやかりたいと思うでしょう。

4. きんもくせい

一方、今日の日本で親しまれているのは、ぎんもくせいの変種である「きんもくせい (金木犀)」です。庭や公園でよく見かけます。
きんもくせいは中国から、江戸時代に入ってきたそうですが、花にカロテノイドが含まれていてオレンジ色。
とても香りが強いので、別名九里香 (九里=とても遠くまで届く香り) といわれます。
その甘い香りを利用して、水洗トイレがなかった、あるいは少なかった時代は、日本の家では、きんもくせいをよくお手洗いのそばに植えたそうです。その名残だと思いますが、私の子ども時代、きんもくせいの合成香料のトイレ消臭剤は、とてもポピュラーでした。
また、この香気が邪気を払うとして、お寺や神社などにも植えられていることがあります。

5. 桂花茶

中国や台湾でも、きんもくせいはとても愛されていて、花の香りを移したお茶やお酒、砂糖漬けなどがあります。きんもくせいフレーバーのシロップをかけたかき氷も動画で見たことがあります!
もくせいの花のお茶は桂花茶といい、花が咲いたら自宅でも淹れられるとか。
緑茶や発酵度の浅い紅茶・ウーロン茶など2に対してきんもくせいの咲き掛けの花1の割で混ぜ、熱めのお湯(摂氏90度、華氏200度ぐらい)で淹れて飲むというレシピを見かけました。

6. きんもくせいとぎんもくせい

日本ではぎんもくせいよりきんもくせいの方が香りが強いと言われています。
でも、チャールストンのぎんもくせいはとても香るので、本当かなあと思っていました。日本のサイトで両方の香りを比べてみた人の話はなかなかないのです。
幸い、米国ジョージア州の植木屋さんのサイトを見つけました。
そこではぎんもくせいときんもくせいを両方扱っていて、そこの人たちは実際にかいでみたそうです。
強さのことは書いてありませんでしたが、香りはかすかに違い、きんもくせいの香りには甘さがより際立っているそうです。
きんもくせいも美しい木だし、香りはよりアジア風と思われているようなので、将来的には庭に植えてみたいです。
でも、とりあえず二年前、ご近所のような小さなぎんもくせいの木を植えたのです。
その木が順調に成長して、庭で「しゃべる (すごく香る) ようになって」欲しい。
いつか、桂花茶を淹れられるかもしれません。

Our Story

The old website is not responsive, and a respected friend advised us to make a responsive website by ourselves. We were and are near illiterate about computers but we slowly learned how to build a basic website using WordPress and today we published the name to you: www.Learnjapanesewithyuko.com. We hope you like it.

Want your school to be the top-listed School/college in Charleston?

Click here to claim your Sponsored Listing.

Videos (show all)

Mockingbird’s spring concert / マネシツグミの春のコンサート

Location

Telephone

About   Contact   Privacy   FAQ   Login C