Idaho Society of Individual Psychology

Idaho Society of Individual Psychology

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ISIP 2021 Virtual Conference (Behind the Scenes...)
I thought you might want to know my book, The Zyprexa Papers, is now available on Amazon at https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0578627264/lawprojectfor-20.

The description is:

On December 17, 2006, The New York Times began a series of front-page stories about documents obtained from Alaska lawyer Jim Gottstein, showing Eli Lilly had concealed that its top-selling drug caused diabetes and other life-shortening metabolic problems. The "Zyprexa Papers," as they came to be known, also showed Eli Lilly was illegally promoting the use of Zyprexa on children and the elderly, with particularly lethal effects. Although Mr. Gottstein believes he obtained the Zyprexa Papers legally, the United States District Court for the Eastern District of New York in Brooklyn decided he had conspired to steal the documents, and Eli Lilly threatened Mr. Gottstein with criminal contempt charges. In The Zyprexa Papers, Mr. Gottstein gives a riveting first-hand account of what really happened, including new details about how a small group of psychiatric survivors spread the Zyprexa Papers on the Internet untraceably. All of this within a gripping, plain-language explanation of complex legal maneuvering and his battles on behalf of Bill Bigley, the psychiatric patient whose ordeal made possible the exposure of the Zyprexa Papers.
Good day everyone. I am a South African currently studying an undergraduate psychology degree in my 3rd year. I am currently completing an assignment on the necessity of body language in rapport building in counselling. If any of you have any short personal insights of how body language assists you to build rapport with your clients then please will you be so kind as to share it for me to use?
INDIVIDUALITY...
I am a graduate student at the University of Southern Mississippi in the Masters of Marriage and Family Therapy Program. I am conducting research on imposter syndrome and how it affects mental health providers rate of burn out. Would you be willing to take our survey and share it with your network of providers?

Thank you in advance for any help you can provide me.

Marla Rosenvall

Hello Everyone! MFT graduate students from the University of Southern Mississippi are conducting a research project on mental health providers perception of themselves and others, and the impact of providing mental health resources in their work as a mental health provider.

If you are a practicing mental health provider, please take our survey. It will take you roughly 5 to 10 minutes to complete and your time will be greatly appreciated.

Below you will find the link to complete the survey.

Please feel free to share!

Survey Link: https://usmep.co1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_87muisT6I7FoT7D
TAP TALk 5/3/2018
EMotional Regulation

Alyson schafer
B.sC., M.A., counselling

Today’s incident rate of anxiety, depression, ADD and ADHD, oppositional defiance and other emotional and behavioral struggles are on the rise. Children’s ability to handle the barrage of stimulus in their environment, including sensory stimulation, social stressors, etc., can be underdeveloped or compromised so their systems are flooded. Having children reduce this flooding is a teachable skill, but they need their parents help in learning such emotional regulation. “Control yourself” is not going to cut it. While Adlerian are holistic in their approach, they learn little about the biological aspects that impact behavior.

This workshop will teach parents and clinicians/ educators who work with children, how to emotionally regulate themselves in the face of a child having an “episode”, and by extension, help children to get regulated and remain regulated to better handle life in a responsive rather than reactive manner.

In this workshop parents will learn:
• A basic understanding of emotional regulation
• The socio-biology of personal connection
• Recognizing what de-regulation looks like and how to respond
• Activities to practice to gain better abilities to regulate ourselves (for parents and child)
• Ways to reduce stressors on the nervous system
• In the moment responses needed to help a child who has “lost it”

Alyson Schafer is a family counsellor, author and internationally acclaimed parenting expert who empowers families by sharing her principles, rules and tools for raising happy and healthy kids. Alyson delivers her deep insights in ways that today’s busy parents can easily understand and apply immediately. As Canada’s leading parenting expert, Alyson promotes a firm but friendly “democratic parenting” style and offers practical solutions backed by extensive research. Her own experience with raising two children using this parenting technique was so eye-opening and effective, she felt compelled to share her knowledge. Her work aims to make life better for all kids through effective child guidance.
To sign in:
Date and Time: May 3, 2018 (9pm Eastern -US and Canada, 8pm Central, 7pm Mountain, 6pm Pacific)
Topic: Emotional Regulation Webinar

Please click the link below to join the webinar:
https://zoom.us/j/353930811?pwd=yuO43ZjOXoo
Password: Adler

Or iPhone one-tap :
US: +16699006833,,353930811# or +16465588656,,353930811#
Or Telephone:
Dial(for higher quality, dial a number based on your current location):
US: +1 669 900 6833 or +1 646 558 8656
Canada: +1 647 558 0588
Webinar ID: 353 930 811
International numbers available: https://zoom.us/u/AoxhxUDS
Continuing Education Credits:
One (1) hour of Continuing Education will be awarded. The North American Society of Adlerian Psychology (NASAP) has been approved by NBCC as an Approved Continuing Education Provider, ACEP No. 5263. NASAP is solely responsible for all aspects of the program.
NASAP Maintains responsibility for this program and its content. For more information: Contact: Bengu Tekinalp or Tim Hartshorne Email:[email protected] or [email protected]
To receive Continuing Education Credit* for the TAPTalk, listen to the talk, download the evaluation form, complete it and send it in with your payment of $5.00 (for members of NASAP) or $10.00 (for non- members).
He was also the originator of "The Dab"! He did it all.
On exogenous factors!

The Idaho Society of Individual Psychology is an organization of people who are interested in furthering the concepts of the Psychology of Alfred Adler.

What is Individual Psychology? Individual Psychology is a philosophical approach to understanding human behavior based on the teachings of Alfred Adler. Individual Psychology helps us understand that all of our behavior is purposeful and the purpose for behavior is to find a meaningful place in any group. Individual Psychology is also based on the idea that all human beings have goals for themselv

Operating as usual

06/03/2021

❤ ADLERIAN "INDIVIDUAL" PSYCHOLOGY ❤ ALFRED ADLER, M.D.

“Adlerian ‘Individual’ Psychology is the model of human behavior as formulated by Alfred Adler, M.D. (1870-1937), Rudolf Dreikurs, M.D. (1897-1972) and others contributing to its development and practice. Adler's theory has stood the test of time and science, as recent discoveries in neuroscience are validating today what Adler taught 100 years ago: as social beings, humans thrive only in relationships of mutual respect. Current schools of psychological theory and therapeutic practice can find roots in Adlerian Psychology including among others: Attachment Theory, Brief Therapy, Client-Centered, Humanistic-Existential, Family Systems, Narrative Therapy, Solution Focused, Reality Therapy, Choice Theory, Gestalt, Positive Psychology, Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy, EMDR, the Strength-Based Empowerment Model, and Life and Parent Coaching. Positive Discipline, the world-renowned child guidance model by Jane Nelsen and Lynn Lott, is based in Adlerian Psychology.”

* North American Society of Adlerian Psychology (NASAP). Edited excerpts by Carroll R. Thomas, Ph.D., June 3, 2017.

❤ ADLERIAN "INDIVIDUAL" PSYCHOLOGY ❤ ALFRED ADLER, M.D.

“Adlerian ‘Individual’ Psychology is the model of human behavior as formulated by Alfred Adler, M.D. (1870-1937), Rudolf Dreikurs, M.D. (1897-1972) and others contributing to its development and practice. Adler's theory has stood the test of time and science, as recent discoveries in neuroscience are validating today what Adler taught 100 years ago: as social beings, humans thrive only in relationships of mutual respect. Current schools of psychological theory and therapeutic practice can find roots in Adlerian Psychology including among others: Attachment Theory, Brief Therapy, Client-Centered, Humanistic-Existential, Family Systems, Narrative Therapy, Solution Focused, Reality Therapy, Choice Theory, Gestalt, Positive Psychology, Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy, EMDR, the Strength-Based Empowerment Model, and Life and Parent Coaching. Positive Discipline, the world-renowned child guidance model by Jane Nelsen and Lynn Lott, is based in Adlerian Psychology.”

* North American Society of Adlerian Psychology (NASAP). Edited excerpts by Carroll R. Thomas, Ph.D., June 3, 2017.

06/02/2021

❤ THE COOPERATION OF ALL ❤ Lydia Bak Sicher, M.D., Ph.D.

“The most significant difference between these two ways of (p. 275) thinking appears to be that in a collective (in the widest meaning of the term), somehow these same progress-resisting solutions are sought in ways characteristic for the neurotic: To regard the collective as the end-goal, as existing only for itself, beside which there is no other way. It looks almost like an eternal ball rotating around its own axis, finally bursting when it contacts other such bodies revolving around themselves.

“In cooperation, however, there is direction, movement towards a goal, which can only be reached if the whole of mankind strives towards unification in order to create an experience of essential worth. This, however, depends on the development of the individuals who strive for ‘perfection’ and who are courageous enough to accept the eternal imperfection of the human race as a task to be worked on by all.

“This, too, demonstrates the difference between the two concepts. The collective arrogantly recognizes itself as perfect and, consequently it is intent upon numerical growth and not on dynamic changes in order to improve.

“In the cooperation of all, however, in the identity of I and You for the purpose of perfecting the whole, lies the hope for harmony and peace. Not the fusion of a One, but uniting for the development of humanity can bring about the ‘wholeness’ of the world and can do justice to the intellect which forms the basis for human dignity” (p. 276).

* Lydia Bak Sicher (1890-1962), The Collected Works of Lydia Bak Sicher: An Adlerian Perspective, 1957/1991. Edited by Adele Davidson. Ft. Bragg, California: QED Press. Excerpts by Carroll R. Thomas, Ph.D., May 31, 2018.

❤ THE COOPERATION OF ALL ❤ Lydia Bak Sicher, M.D., Ph.D.

“The most significant difference between these two ways of (p. 275) thinking appears to be that in a collective (in the widest meaning of the term), somehow these same progress-resisting solutions are sought in ways characteristic for the neurotic: To regard the collective as the end-goal, as existing only for itself, beside which there is no other way. It looks almost like an eternal ball rotating around its own axis, finally bursting when it contacts other such bodies revolving around themselves.

“In cooperation, however, there is direction, movement towards a goal, which can only be reached if the whole of mankind strives towards unification in order to create an experience of essential worth. This, however, depends on the development of the individuals who strive for ‘perfection’ and who are courageous enough to accept the eternal imperfection of the human race as a task to be worked on by all.

“This, too, demonstrates the difference between the two concepts. The collective arrogantly recognizes itself as perfect and, consequently it is intent upon numerical growth and not on dynamic changes in order to improve.

“In the cooperation of all, however, in the identity of I and You for the purpose of perfecting the whole, lies the hope for harmony and peace. Not the fusion of a One, but uniting for the development of humanity can bring about the ‘wholeness’ of the world and can do justice to the intellect which forms the basis for human dignity” (p. 276).

* Lydia Bak Sicher (1890-1962), The Collected Works of Lydia Bak Sicher: An Adlerian Perspective, 1957/1991. Edited by Adele Davidson. Ft. Bragg, California: QED Press. Excerpts by Carroll R. Thomas, Ph.D., May 31, 2018.

06/01/2021

❤ UNDERSTANDING ❤ "You can tell if a person has really understood what you've told him. He (or she) will always laugh." -- Alfred Adler (1870-1937), Alfred Adler: As We Remember Him, 1977. Excerpt by Carroll R. Thomas, Ph.D., June 1. 2013.

❤ UNDERSTANDING ❤ "You can tell if a person has really understood what you've told him. He (or she) will always laugh." -- Alfred Adler (1870-1937), Alfred Adler: As We Remember Him, 1977. Excerpt by Carroll R. Thomas, Ph.D., June 1. 2013.

05/28/2021

❤ INTELLECT AND INTEREST ❤ Alfred Adler, M.D.

“The strongest factor in the development of intellectual ability is interest, and we have seen how interest is blocked, not through heredity, but through discouragement and the fear of defeat. It is doubtless true that the actual structure of the brain is to some degree inherited, but the brain is the instrument, not the origin, of the mind, and provided any defect is not too severe for us to overcome it with our present knowledge, the brain can be trained to compensate for it. Behind very exceptional degrees of ability we shall find, not an exceptional inheritance, but sustained interest and training.” -- Alfred Adler (1870-1937), What Life Could Mean to You, 1931/1992, p. 145. Excerpts by Carroll R. Thomas, Ph.D., May 28, 2013.

❤ INTELLECT AND INTEREST ❤ Alfred Adler, M.D.

“The strongest factor in the development of intellectual ability is interest, and we have seen how interest is blocked, not through heredity, but through discouragement and the fear of defeat. It is doubtless true that the actual structure of the brain is to some degree inherited, but the brain is the instrument, not the origin, of the mind, and provided any defect is not too severe for us to overcome it with our present knowledge, the brain can be trained to compensate for it. Behind very exceptional degrees of ability we shall find, not an exceptional inheritance, but sustained interest and training.” -- Alfred Adler (1870-1937), What Life Could Mean to You, 1931/1992, p. 145. Excerpts by Carroll R. Thomas, Ph.D., May 28, 2013.

05/20/2021

❤ THE STRIVING FOR SIGNIFICANCE ❤ Alfred Adler, M.D.

"The goal of the human soul is conquest, perfection, security, superiority. Every child is faced with so many obstacles in life that no child grows up without striving for some form of significance." -- Alfred Adler (1870-1937)

“The two factors that dominate all psychological processes are social interest (Gemeinschafts-gefuhl) and striving for significance (Geltungsstreben).” -- Alfred Adler (1870-1937)

“Every human being strives for significance; but people always make mistakes if they do not see that their whole significance must consist in their contribution to the lives of others.” -- Alfred Adler (1870-1937), What Life Should Mean to You, 1931, p. 8. Edited by Alan Porter.

“In an optimal situation of development, adults will win children’s cooperation, helping them to develop a sense of significance through contributing to others, minimizing inferiority feelings, stimulating their courage, guiding them to be active, and helping them to feel a part of the whole. These experiences will help children identify and develop their capacities and become, cooperative, productive, and satisfied adults. They will be able to see and feel their interdependence with others and be challenged to develop sufficient courage to deal with difficulties, to connect intimately with others, and to improve themselves for the benefit of all. They may eventually be guided by universal values or principles -- perhaps of justice, beauty, truth, etc. They will be able to use their inferiority feelings as spurs for continued development. They will strive for superiority over difficulties rather than superiority over others. They will have solved the problems posed by the tasks of life in a mutually beneficial way.” -- Henry T. Stein and Martha E. Edwards, The Collected Clinical Works of Alfred Adler: Volume 12: The General System of Individual Psychology, 2006, p. 205.

“The striving for significance, this sense of yearning, always points out to us that all psychological phenomena contain a movement that starts from a feeling of inferiority and reach upward. The theory of Individual Psychology of psychological compensation states that the stronger the feeling of inferiority, the higher the goal for personal power.” -- Alfred Adler (1870-1937). “Progress in Individual Psychology,” [1923] a journal article by Alfred Adler, in the AAISF/ATP Archives. Excerpts by Carroll R. Thomas, Ph.D., May 20, 2018.

❤ THE STRIVING FOR SIGNIFICANCE ❤ Alfred Adler, M.D.

"The goal of the human soul is conquest, perfection, security, superiority. Every child is faced with so many obstacles in life that no child grows up without striving for some form of significance." -- Alfred Adler (1870-1937)

“The two factors that dominate all psychological processes are social interest (Gemeinschafts-gefuhl) and striving for significance (Geltungsstreben).” -- Alfred Adler (1870-1937)

“Every human being strives for significance; but people always make mistakes if they do not see that their whole significance must consist in their contribution to the lives of others.” -- Alfred Adler (1870-1937), What Life Should Mean to You, 1931, p. 8. Edited by Alan Porter.

“In an optimal situation of development, adults will win children’s cooperation, helping them to develop a sense of significance through contributing to others, minimizing inferiority feelings, stimulating their courage, guiding them to be active, and helping them to feel a part of the whole. These experiences will help children identify and develop their capacities and become, cooperative, productive, and satisfied adults. They will be able to see and feel their interdependence with others and be challenged to develop sufficient courage to deal with difficulties, to connect intimately with others, and to improve themselves for the benefit of all. They may eventually be guided by universal values or principles -- perhaps of justice, beauty, truth, etc. They will be able to use their inferiority feelings as spurs for continued development. They will strive for superiority over difficulties rather than superiority over others. They will have solved the problems posed by the tasks of life in a mutually beneficial way.” -- Henry T. Stein and Martha E. Edwards, The Collected Clinical Works of Alfred Adler: Volume 12: The General System of Individual Psychology, 2006, p. 205.

“The striving for significance, this sense of yearning, always points out to us that all psychological phenomena contain a movement that starts from a feeling of inferiority and reach upward. The theory of Individual Psychology of psychological compensation states that the stronger the feeling of inferiority, the higher the goal for personal power.” -- Alfred Adler (1870-1937). “Progress in Individual Psychology,” [1923] a journal article by Alfred Adler, in the AAISF/ATP Archives. Excerpts by Carroll R. Thomas, Ph.D., May 20, 2018.

05/08/2021

❤ GENUINE COURAGE ❤ Alfred Adler, M.D.

"Under circumstances calling, not for an appearance of courage but for a courageous impulse and act, the genuineness of this courage of mine will appear." -- Alfred Adler (1870-1937)

“If I lock the doors of the room where I am sitting, and if there are two friendly watch dogs to guard those doors and a couple of police officers right at hand, I can walk around and say quite calmly that I have no physical fear. I am not trembling, my heartbeat is regular -- I have no symptom of terror. My statement is true. In this locked and guarded room I am in a sheltered situation where I can play quite splendidly the part of a man of courage. But if I am alone on a deserted street at night, or if I see a little child in sudden peril -- under circumstances calling, not for an appearance of courage but for a courageous impulse and act, the genuineness of this courage of mine will appear. And so it is with children. If they are away from home, if the sense of sheltering protection is decreased, it is possible to see them as they really are.”

* Alfred Adler (1870-1937). Specific reference needed. Excerpts by Carroll R. Thomas, Ph.D., May 8, 2019.

❤ GENUINE COURAGE ❤ Alfred Adler, M.D.

"Under circumstances calling, not for an appearance of courage but for a courageous impulse and act, the genuineness of this courage of mine will appear." -- Alfred Adler (1870-1937)

“If I lock the doors of the room where I am sitting, and if there are two friendly watch dogs to guard those doors and a couple of police officers right at hand, I can walk around and say quite calmly that I have no physical fear. I am not trembling, my heartbeat is regular -- I have no symptom of terror. My statement is true. In this locked and guarded room I am in a sheltered situation where I can play quite splendidly the part of a man of courage. But if I am alone on a deserted street at night, or if I see a little child in sudden peril -- under circumstances calling, not for an appearance of courage but for a courageous impulse and act, the genuineness of this courage of mine will appear. And so it is with children. If they are away from home, if the sense of sheltering protection is decreased, it is possible to see them as they really are.”

* Alfred Adler (1870-1937). Specific reference needed. Excerpts by Carroll R. Thomas, Ph.D., May 8, 2019.

05/06/2021

❤ LIFE IS ABOUT SHARING ❤ Alfred Adler, M.D.

"Understanding is a matter of sharing, not a private function." -- Alfred Adler (1870-1937)

“It is only through our interest in our fellow human beings that any of our human capabilities develop. To speak, to read and to write all presuppose a bond with other people. Language itself is common to all mankind; it is a product of social interest. Understanding is a matter of sharing, not a private function. To understand means to comprehend in a way that we expect everybody else to share. It is to connect ourselves through a shared medium with other people, to submit to the common experience of all humanity.” -- Alfred Adler (1870-1937), What Life Could Mean to You, 1931/1992, p. 211.

“I must emphasize that activity should not be confused with courage, although there is no courage without activity. But only the activity of an individual who plays the game, cooperates, and shares in life can be designated as courage.” -- Alfred Adler (1870-1937), Alfred Adler: Superiority and Social Interest, 1964/1973, p. 60.

“Side by side, each with his own start, his own road, his own goal, individuals can walk together, work together . . . contributing their share to life.” -- Lydia Sicher (1890-1962), “Education for Freedom,” 1955.

“Life is not about all giving on the one hand and all taking on the other. It is about sharing.” -- James Hemings (1765-1801)

“By their fruits ye shall know them.” -- Holy Bible

* Excerpts by Carroll R. Thomas, Ph.D., May 6, 2019.

❤ LIFE IS ABOUT SHARING ❤ Alfred Adler, M.D.

"Understanding is a matter of sharing, not a private function." -- Alfred Adler (1870-1937)

“It is only through our interest in our fellow human beings that any of our human capabilities develop. To speak, to read and to write all presuppose a bond with other people. Language itself is common to all mankind; it is a product of social interest. Understanding is a matter of sharing, not a private function. To understand means to comprehend in a way that we expect everybody else to share. It is to connect ourselves through a shared medium with other people, to submit to the common experience of all humanity.” -- Alfred Adler (1870-1937), What Life Could Mean to You, 1931/1992, p. 211.

“I must emphasize that activity should not be confused with courage, although there is no courage without activity. But only the activity of an individual who plays the game, cooperates, and shares in life can be designated as courage.” -- Alfred Adler (1870-1937), Alfred Adler: Superiority and Social Interest, 1964/1973, p. 60.

“Side by side, each with his own start, his own road, his own goal, individuals can walk together, work together . . . contributing their share to life.” -- Lydia Sicher (1890-1962), “Education for Freedom,” 1955.

“Life is not about all giving on the one hand and all taking on the other. It is about sharing.” -- James Hemings (1765-1801)

“By their fruits ye shall know them.” -- Holy Bible

* Excerpts by Carroll R. Thomas, Ph.D., May 6, 2019.

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Each year two workshops are offered in each of the cities where training is provided, leading to Certification of Professional Studies in Adlerian Psychology. ISIP also offers two workshops every year in Boise leading to a Certificate of Advanced Studies in Adlerian Psychology. Over 200 counselors, social workers and therapists have graduated from the Series. About thirty mental health professionals have completed the necessary 5-course requirement of the graduate program. A large number of mental health agencies take advantage of the 20% discount for sending 3 or more from their agencies. These are the folks who are out there in the “white water” when it comes to providing mental health services to their communities.