Good Hope Support Organization

Good Hope Support Organization

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Had the opportunity today to observe Schola teach a review of this week's lessons on geography -- maps and the parts of a map. Good stuff. She's a pro!

As a youth center we provide a stepping stone program and free schooling to the disadvantaged youth in Moshi.

Operating as usual

23/08/2021

SENSITIVE MATERIAL WARNING:

Good Hope is in mourning. With permission from her parents, we want to share the story of our dear student Halima, who passed away under preventable circumstances. She was 20 years old.

Halima joined the Good Hope program in early 2015 and stayed in our Secondary School Preparation Program for two years. In December 2016 she was provided a School Sponsorship, finished middle school, and in 2021 she began vocational training at Moshi’s excellent vocational training center, VETA. She studied Machine Tool Repairing. Halima was a quiet but confident young woman, which was also reflected in her wonderful choice to join a course that is relatively atypical for young Muslim women.

On July 23, Halima passed away from complications caused by a pregnancy. A pregnancy that she had to hide if she wanted to continue her studies. Our society highly values discretion, as discretion is very productive for stable social bonds. And we at Good Hope respect and cherish that discretion. But it also comes with a downside – it can prevent people from seeking much needed help.

Halima could not tell her parents about her pregnancy, as it is often family members who report their pregnant children at school. The girls, in turn, get expelled, as pregnant schoolgirls are denied further education. Halima also did not receive prenatal care, care that would have provided her with supplements, with screenings that might have shown whether something was wrong with her twin fetuses, and counselling on ways to create a future for herself and her children.

The passing of our dear student, our child, causes us to reflect deeply on how we, as a Team, can prevent such grief in the future. Our hearts are broken for Halima and her family. We do not want other students, other families, our community to experience such tragedy and heartbreak.

- What should we have done differently?
- How can we provide positive and appropriate reproductive health lessons?
- How can we offer a contact point for counselling that respects the students’ wishes for discretion, while also offering all the support a student might need?

SENSITIVE MATERIAL WARNING:

Good Hope is in mourning. With permission from her parents, we want to share the story of our dear student Halima, who passed away under preventable circumstances. She was 20 years old.

Halima joined the Good Hope program in early 2015 and stayed in our Secondary School Preparation Program for two years. In December 2016 she was provided a School Sponsorship, finished middle school, and in 2021 she began vocational training at Moshi’s excellent vocational training center, VETA. She studied Machine Tool Repairing. Halima was a quiet but confident young woman, which was also reflected in her wonderful choice to join a course that is relatively atypical for young Muslim women.

On July 23, Halima passed away from complications caused by a pregnancy. A pregnancy that she had to hide if she wanted to continue her studies. Our society highly values discretion, as discretion is very productive for stable social bonds. And we at Good Hope respect and cherish that discretion. But it also comes with a downside – it can prevent people from seeking much needed help.

Halima could not tell her parents about her pregnancy, as it is often family members who report their pregnant children at school. The girls, in turn, get expelled, as pregnant schoolgirls are denied further education. Halima also did not receive prenatal care, care that would have provided her with supplements, with screenings that might have shown whether something was wrong with her twin fetuses, and counselling on ways to create a future for herself and her children.

The passing of our dear student, our child, causes us to reflect deeply on how we, as a Team, can prevent such grief in the future. Our hearts are broken for Halima and her family. We do not want other students, other families, our community to experience such tragedy and heartbreak.

- What should we have done differently?
- How can we provide positive and appropriate reproductive health lessons?
- How can we offer a contact point for counselling that respects the students’ wishes for discretion, while also offering all the support a student might need?

26/07/2021

It has been six months since our Binti Pads project came to life. It is part of our Mabinti Project that aims to provide teenage mothers with education and vocational training.

Our biggest dream is for all students to have equal opportunities to finish middle school if they wish to, and to encourage life-long learning. One major challenge for school girls, some as young as nine years old, is the lack of sanitary products during the time of their me********on which causes many girls to miss out classes during that time.

We are beside ourselves with joy to have seen the tremendous support we received from you as friends and donors, from the schools we visited, and the local governments. The project has also been so warmly welcomed and well received by the girls, who opened up during the menstrual health training provided by Sarah and/or Oliver. We provided a safe space where any kinds of questions can be asked, such as “what if I am 14 years old and I still have not gotten it?”, “what type of underwear can I wear with the pads?”. Other students raised their concerns over not having underwear strong enough to keep a pad in, and others asked what to do if it leaks. Many questions that girls often cannot ask their parents or teachers about, due to the great stigma around periods.

Thanks to you, we have been able to visit four primary schools and provide sanitary pads and menstrual health training. In total we have provided 267 packages of Binti Pads this year, each pack containing four pads. That’s 1068 pads. Wow!

A tremendous thanks to all who have supported us! 🥰

It has been six months since our Binti Pads project came to life. It is part of our Mabinti Project that aims to provide teenage mothers with education and vocational training.

Our biggest dream is for all students to have equal opportunities to finish middle school if they wish to, and to encourage life-long learning. One major challenge for school girls, some as young as nine years old, is the lack of sanitary products during the time of their me********on which causes many girls to miss out classes during that time.

We are beside ourselves with joy to have seen the tremendous support we received from you as friends and donors, from the schools we visited, and the local governments. The project has also been so warmly welcomed and well received by the girls, who opened up during the menstrual health training provided by Sarah and/or Oliver. We provided a safe space where any kinds of questions can be asked, such as “what if I am 14 years old and I still have not gotten it?”, “what type of underwear can I wear with the pads?”. Other students raised their concerns over not having underwear strong enough to keep a pad in, and others asked what to do if it leaks. Many questions that girls often cannot ask their parents or teachers about, due to the great stigma around periods.

Thanks to you, we have been able to visit four primary schools and provide sanitary pads and menstrual health training. In total we have provided 267 packages of Binti Pads this year, each pack containing four pads. That’s 1068 pads. Wow!

A tremendous thanks to all who have supported us! 🥰

16/06/2021

Today is International Day of the African Child. While this day originated in South Africa in the 1970s, it has become an important annual event across the continent. This day wants to bring attention to the barriers our children in their pursuit for quality education in Africa face.

Our Good Hope students are on the streets today, protesting for better education just like the children did in South Africa in 1976. And we are happy to also share our thoughts with our friends on Social Media.

First of all, we want to share with you how incredibly proud we are of our children across our continent, and especially of those coming to Good Hope. We are so proud of them, because they refuse to be held back by the challenges that poverty poses for their education. Our students work on their dreams, increasingly believe in themselves, push forward, and develop deep friendships with their classmates along the way.

When a child wants to enroll at Good Hope after primary school, one of our first questions usually is “Do you know how to read and write?” For a good reason, because we have come to realize that many students who come to Good Hope do not know how to read and write fluently. So, we make sure to provide them with individual support from the first day on.

Some of our students’ parents themselves sign with three X’s on our parent-meetings, as they themselves do not know how to write. For some of our students, being able to study through and with their parents or guardians, or having an immediate role-model, has been a great factor for their (non-)success especially in primary school.

Others have been sick for a longer period of time and were not able to catch up anymore in the classrooms that usually accommodate 50 students and more. And others go to school without having breakfast and remain hungry until late in the afternoon.

That's why we have to work on and advocate for some of the root causes for students’ non-success in primary school. Let’s work hand in hand and break the cycle, and enable our students to become role-models for their siblings and in their neighborhoods.

Today is International Day of the African Child. While this day originated in South Africa in the 1970s, it has become an important annual event across the continent. This day wants to bring attention to the barriers our children in their pursuit for quality education in Africa face.

Our Good Hope students are on the streets today, protesting for better education just like the children did in South Africa in 1976. And we are happy to also share our thoughts with our friends on Social Media.

First of all, we want to share with you how incredibly proud we are of our children across our continent, and especially of those coming to Good Hope. We are so proud of them, because they refuse to be held back by the challenges that poverty poses for their education. Our students work on their dreams, increasingly believe in themselves, push forward, and develop deep friendships with their classmates along the way.

When a child wants to enroll at Good Hope after primary school, one of our first questions usually is “Do you know how to read and write?” For a good reason, because we have come to realize that many students who come to Good Hope do not know how to read and write fluently. So, we make sure to provide them with individual support from the first day on.

Some of our students’ parents themselves sign with three X’s on our parent-meetings, as they themselves do not know how to write. For some of our students, being able to study through and with their parents or guardians, or having an immediate role-model, has been a great factor for their (non-)success especially in primary school.

Others have been sick for a longer period of time and were not able to catch up anymore in the classrooms that usually accommodate 50 students and more. And others go to school without having breakfast and remain hungry until late in the afternoon.

That's why we have to work on and advocate for some of the root causes for students’ non-success in primary school. Let’s work hand in hand and break the cycle, and enable our students to become role-models for their siblings and in their neighborhoods.

28/05/2021

Today is International Menstrual Hygiene Day! We invite you to celebrate with us and spread awareness. Together we can empower girls and women to realize and reach their full potential!

A study* by HakiElimu has shown that one quarter of school girls stated that their Me********on Cycle poses a problem in schooling in Kilimanjaro Region. Ninety percent of more than 1000 surveyed girls even stated that they fear attending classes during their period. Why is that?

As we have mentioned before, period poverty is a serious issue, especially for children from marginalized families. A child usually lives on less than one dollar per day, and buying a pack of disposable sanitary pads for five dollar per daughter every month therefore poses a serious challenge for families. The alternative is usually a folded piece of cloth, which is not leak-proof at all. In Tanzania periods are often attached with great stigma, and even asking parents for a pack of disposable pads can pose an issue for girls. The other issue is the possible leakage of the piece of cloth, as it can cause girls to feel ashamed and be laughed at. This causes girls to call in sick in order to avoid going to school and to escape the stigma.

While the Good Hope Team continued doing research on the lives and issues of pregnant school girls and teenage mothers, the issue of supply for menstrual hygiene products increasingly appeared. Even our girls at Good Hope entrust our female leadership with their issues and needs surrounding their monthly hygiene. We have come to realize that this is one important factor for young girls, even in primary school (7th grade), that can hinder them from successfully continuing and finishing their education. This is why Good Hope started providing reusable, washable sanitary pads combined with a menstrual health training to school girls. We want to support girls in their pursuit for higher education. Reusable sanitary pads are still not widely available, and we want to change that with our Binti Pads! (For more info link in BIO)

* Report from 2019: "A Study on Girls' Basic Education in Tanzania"

Today is International Menstrual Hygiene Day! We invite you to celebrate with us and spread awareness. Together we can empower girls and women to realize and reach their full potential!

A study* by HakiElimu has shown that one quarter of school girls stated that their Me********on Cycle poses a problem in schooling in Kilimanjaro Region. Ninety percent of more than 1000 surveyed girls even stated that they fear attending classes during their period. Why is that?

As we have mentioned before, period poverty is a serious issue, especially for children from marginalized families. A child usually lives on less than one dollar per day, and buying a pack of disposable sanitary pads for five dollar per daughter every month therefore poses a serious challenge for families. The alternative is usually a folded piece of cloth, which is not leak-proof at all. In Tanzania periods are often attached with great stigma, and even asking parents for a pack of disposable pads can pose an issue for girls. The other issue is the possible leakage of the piece of cloth, as it can cause girls to feel ashamed and be laughed at. This causes girls to call in sick in order to avoid going to school and to escape the stigma.

While the Good Hope Team continued doing research on the lives and issues of pregnant school girls and teenage mothers, the issue of supply for menstrual hygiene products increasingly appeared. Even our girls at Good Hope entrust our female leadership with their issues and needs surrounding their monthly hygiene. We have come to realize that this is one important factor for young girls, even in primary school (7th grade), that can hinder them from successfully continuing and finishing their education. This is why Good Hope started providing reusable, washable sanitary pads combined with a menstrual health training to school girls. We want to support girls in their pursuit for higher education. Reusable sanitary pads are still not widely available, and we want to change that with our Binti Pads! (For more info link in BIO)

* Report from 2019: "A Study on Girls' Basic Education in Tanzania"

Made by Girls for Girls: Binti Pads - Good Hope Support Organization 17/05/2021

Made by Girls for Girls: Binti Pads - Good Hope Support Organization

We are so happy to present our Binti-Pads to you!
Binti is Swahili for “girl” or “daughter”. Our pads are sewn by the young mothers from our Mabinti Project for teenage mothers. Our pads aim at giving hope and support to all women and especially school girls.

Our Binti-Pads tackle three main issues:
#1 Keeping school girls in school and boosting their confidence: Many school girls do not go to school during their period, which can equal up to one month per year of neglected education. This is due to period poverty and lack of access to sanitary pads, as well as the stigma, shame, and/or fear of leaking blood on their school uniforms.

#2 Providing teenage-mothers with a source of income and education: Whilst our Mabinti want to learn a profession, the lack of both income and family support prevents the young mothers from continuing further training. By selling our Binti-Pads the young mothers are provided with income and child care, and most importantly, specialized tailoring training.

#3 Saving the environment: Our Binti-Pads are environmentally friendly, as they are easily washable and reusable for more than one year. A girl can use up to 15 plastic sanitary pads during her period which adds to pollution of our environment, especially in Tanzania where trash is often burned by hand, or buried in the ground by families.

We bring together young mothers and the community by manufacturing and providing re-usable sanitary pads. We manufacture pads in different sizes for night and day. One pack with four pads in different sizes costs 17.000 TZS (6.50 EUR or 7.80USD) only.

We are asking our friends for their support to help us provide packs of washable pads to as many schoolgirls in the Kilimanjaro area as possible. As soon as we have gathered enough money to provide one class of students with pads, we will go to a primary or secondary school. We will then provide this class with education on menstrual hygiene and open a discussion in order to fight stigma. Each student will be provided with one pack of pads.
Want to support our efforts to make a positive impact on the lives of girls in our community? Please visit our website for more info about the project and ways of donating. 👉 http://goodhopemoshi.org/projects/binti-pads/

Curious about our program? Please feel free to discuss, reach out, ask questions.

Made by Girls for Girls: Binti Pads - Good Hope Support Organization Binti Pads is a project under our program for teenage mothers, our Mabinti Project. Binti Pads is a social enterprise of young mothers manufacturing, donating and selling reusable sanitary pads. The program also aims to dispel taboos and increase knowledge about me********on health through female he...

Our Story

GOOD HOPE is a growing youth and community center located in Majengo kwa Mtei, a suburb of Moshi. GOOD HOPE aims to provide a stepping stone to further education or vocational training for primary school graduates by providing free schooling in English, mathematics, geography, etc. We also offer sponsorships for further formal education as well as close counselling with the students and their parents or guardians. GOOD HOPE also provides emotional and material aid for people in need in the community in Majengo.

Videos (show all)

Good Hope reaching out to members of the community to educate about Corona
Good Hope is one of the few NGOs in Moshi to take actions against the further rapid spreading of Corona. After our emerg...
Present cintinuous grammar and reading exercise at Good Hope
"I like to come to Good Hope, because here we have good teachers and good friends." - ArnoldWe are always happy when our...
Check out our students' presentations. We are so proud of all of them!!!
The students wish to share with you a message about the upcoming fun run!
The Good Hope Students performing "You've Got a Friend in Me" with original choreography at our most recent fundraiser i...
Cooking in the Rain
A few of our sponsored kids and volunteers went to the pool this weekend and were surprised by this visitor!
Zeina and Mwanahawa at Merinyo SS

Location

Category

Products

On-site Schooling and Counselling,
Scholarship Program,
Afternoon Tuition,
Secondary School Preparation Short Course,
Research on Teenage Mothers

Telephone

Address


Njoro, Sokoni Street
Moshi

Opening Hours

Monday 08:30 - 15:00
Tuesday 08:30 - 15:00
Wednesday 08:30 - 15:00
Thursday 08:30 - 15:00
Friday 08:30 - 15:00
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