Cutting Edge Newspaper

Cutting Edge Newspaper is the official Newspaper of Cuttington University in Suakoko, B**g County, Liberia, and is a Public Relations arm of the University.

[12/17/16]   The Cutting Edge Newspaper- +231-886-403-363

[04/04/13]   RYHF Founder, Shelley Spurlock,
Visits CU President
By Leviticus P. Whamah/0886403363/ [email protected]
The President and Founder of Raise Your Hand Foundation (RYHF), based in the United States of America , has paid a one-day long visit to the President of Cuttington University, Dr. Henrique F. Tokpa, at his Executive Office on the University’s main campus in Suakoko, B**g County.
Mrs. Shelley Spurlock, at head of a seven-man delegation from her organization, was accompanied by Mr. Alexander Ireland, RYHF Country Director, Candace Smith, RYHF Special Projects in the USA, Rev. Moses Wonta, RYHF Scholarship Supervisor, among others. In brief chat with CU Boss, Mrs. Spurlock commended the University’s Administration for the level of partnership between her organization and Cuttington University. She mentioned that her organization is currently sponsoring several students at Cuttington University, Smyth Institution in Monrovia, Stella Maris, Mother Patern College of Health Sciences, Bomi Community College, and Grand Bassa Community College in various disciplines, including Nursing, Agriculture, Education, Biology, Building Construction, among others.
She explained to President Tokpa that plans are on the way to ship several books to the University that would benefit students at Cuttington University in B**g County. Mrs. Spurlock further explained that by September this year, she will begin a scholarship program in honor of Jacob Zuma, one of RYHF members who significantly contributed to Raise Your Hand Foundation at Cuttington University and died due to illness. Mrs. Spurlock stressed that she has concluded with authorities at the University of Liberia to sponsor 15 Geology students beginning this year.
During Mrs. Spurlock visit at Cuttington University, she interacted with students of the University and even served as Guest Speaker at the University’s Thursday Assembly.
In response, the CU President, Dr. Henrique F. Tokpa, lauded Mrs. Spurlock for the visit and pledged his institution’s support for a strong partnership. Dr. Tokpa stated that since the inception of RYHF student Chapter at Cuttington University, he has been supportive of their work.

[04/04/13]   EHELD Turns over New
Furbished Faculty Common Room
By Leviticus P. Whamah/0886403363, [email protected] /0886403363

The College of Agriculture and Sustainable Development at Cuttington University has received a well furnished Faculty Common Room for staff at the college. The project was initiated by USAID through the Excellence for Higher Education for Liberian Development (EHELD), an implementing arm for USAID, which is strongly providing support to the Agriculture College, making it the Center for Excellence in Agriculture in Liberia.
Turning the facility to Cuttington University Administration, EHELD Chief of Party, Dr. Dave Martin Hall, said in time past, the common room was just an office for EHELD at the Cuttington University Agriculture College, something, he mentioned, was not good for the Center. He stated that the area which was previously being used by EHELD was now changed and furnished for staff at the University.
Dr. Hall noted that with the setting up of a new Common Room, Lecturers and other staff members will now have a place to rest during their leisure schedules. He named some of the facilities that are placed in the staff common room as laptops, comfortable office chairs, storages to keep personal effects, ice box, stationery, printer, photo copier, air conditioner, etc.
Speaking on behalf of Cuttington University Administration, the Vice President for Public Relations at the University, Dr. Joshua D. B. Giddings, praised the EHELD family for the gesture and noted it would go a long way to ease the space problem for faculty and staff members who are truly in need of a faculty lounge. The ceremony was attended by staff of the College, faculty members and top senior staff from administration.

[04/03/13]   Kakata City US$1, 046,000 Rehab Project Kick-Off
Margibi County Supt. John Z. Buway

By Patrick C.M. Kollie

The rehabilitation of streets, roads, drainages as well as the reconditioning of alleys in the provincial city of Kakata, Margibi County have begun with residents expressing gratitude to local county administration. The exercise will cost little over One Million Forty Six Thousand United States Dollars.

Appearing live on local radio talk show recently, the Superintendent of Margibi County, Hon. John Zuba Buway said the exercise would focus the rehabilitation of major streets within the city center covering parts of electoral districts #3 &4 respectively. He said alleys will be reconditioned including drainages to give facelift to the city.

The Margibi County superintendent acknowledged that the project would last for eight (8) months. He said the process is part of the ongoing county development programs executed by local administration in the county.
According to Supt. Buway, the county administration has contracted the Modern Development Management Cooperation to carry out the rehabilitation process of Kakata City, Margibi County.

Mr. Buway noted, the Kakata Rehabilitation project, when completed will get sanitary release to inhabitants of the city. He said the exercise will also help boom the economics of a densely populated commercial breeding center.

Supt. Buway however, called on residents to cooperate and work along with contractors to ensure the smooth implementation of the rehabilitation work of the city.
According to Supt. Buway, Public Works specialists were also in the city helping the contractors to ensure that alleys and other major streets are free of unauthorized structures.

22/01/2013

Cutting Edge Newspaper






Commentary By Dr. Joshua D. B. Giddings.

COMMENTARY
LOOKING AT THE LEYMAH GBOWEE STORY FROM ANOTHER ANGLE
By Dr. Joshua D.B. Giddings/0886552536

Leymah Gbowee, once a favorite among the grass-root women of Liberia, seems to have hit the rock with some women for her criticism of the Liberian President, Madam Ellen Johnson Sirleaf. She is now like a lonely voice among the women crying in the wilderness. She has been abandoned by groups who are now condemning her statement as “Unfortunate” against the Liberian President.

Leymah Gbowee, who, along with President Sirleaf, was among three women to win the 2012 Nobel Peace Prize, was quoted by journalists in Paris while there to launch her book, as saying, “People are very disappointed. We have a deficit when it comes to having a moral voice in the country.” According to the report, she accused President Sirleaf of not having the political will to fight corruption in the country, not being committed to reconciliation and engaging in “nepotism”(the placing of one’s close relatives and associates in high positions). For uttering these words, Leymah has been bombarded from left and right by critics who accuse her of lacking moral rectitude for saying the unthinkable about the Liberian President.

A women group, under the banner “Women of Liberia,” whose members came from the fifteen counties to welcome President Sirleaf at the Roberts International Airport from her trip to Tokyo, Japan, condemned Leymah, and told the President: “We say it was wrong for Madam Gbowee who enjoyed your confidence and had unhindered access to you, to attempt to cast a shadow, not only on you as a person, but on the great image you have tried to rebuild for a country that is striving toward development….” (The News, October 19, 2012).

With a little bit more reflection, maybe people should begin looking at Leymah’s criticism of the President in a different light. Responding to the same criticism from different quarters on the issue of nepotism, President Sirleaf was quoted in July as saying, “If I want a job done, and I know that a close relative of mine can get it done, I will put the relative there, because the results are more important to me than the noise in the market.” She also further emphasized that her sons, Robert Sirleaf, Senior Advisor to her and Chairman of the National Oil Company of Liberia (NOCAL) and Charles Sirleaf, Deputy Governor of the Central Bank of Liberia, are both well qualified for their respective positions (Daily Observer, July 17, 2012).

What makes such a statement from the President peculiar is the fact that, for those who can remember, it sounds strange coming from someone who was a very strong advocate against cronyism, corruption and nepotism during the Tolbert and Doe eras – a stance which many times led her into trouble. According to George Boley, in his book, titled, The Rise and fall of the First Republic, Madam Sirleaf, as Minister of Finance under President Tolbert, was extremely vocal on these issues, saying, “Nobody is above or should be above the laws of the land and that those laws are meant to be obeyed and adhered to” (1984, p. 92). This was in reference to top government officials, who were in the habit of evading tax payment to the government in those days.

At that time, Tolbert himself had admitted corruption in his government as he publicly declared, that “favoritism and nepotism are cancerous proclivities capable only of sapping the springs of national vitality and drying the ‘wells of peace and plenty.’” Yet Tolbert was accused of these same vices, because he had several relatives, most of whom may have also been well qualified, in high places in his government. In addition, he publicly admitted in 1978 that four million dollars was embezzled by some government officials although none were prosecuted then by government (Ibid., pp. 96-97).

Samuel Kanyon Doe came into the picture during the 1980 coup, executing officials of government for “rampant” corruption although Prince Johnson tells us in his book, titled, The Rise and Fall of President Kanyon Doe, that “Corruption, under Doe, tripled than that of the past administrations” (1991, p.18). According to him when Dr. H. Boima Fahnbulleh, Jr. criticized Doe and his regime for their “Get Rich Quick Attitude”, Doe said, “If Dr. Boima Fahnbulleh wants to be poor, let him be so. But he should not stop those who prefer to be rich” (Ibid.).

I thought it expedient to go back a little in history to bring up these points as we discuss the present issue of Leymah’s criticism of the President. No one can deny the tremendous stride that Liberia has made under the dynamic leadership of President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf in the last seven years. She has, indeed, brought the nation out of an abyss back into the comity of nations; however this should not stifle constructive criticisms. There are even those who wonder whether any other Liberian serving as President in her shoes now would do better than she. The answer to such a view could be yes, even though difficult. But any President, who would choose to do things differently from other past presidents, could be such a president. And that is a president who eschews those negative vices of the past, such as cronyism, corruption, nepotism, etc., which have kept Liberia, the oldest independent black African nation at the bottom of development in the world.

I am with the strongest conviction that God placed Madam Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, the first elected female president of Africa, at the helm of this nation at this point in time in our history for a special purpose – to make a difference; to lead us away from the same old ways which have kept Liberia underdeveloped for over a century. When it becomes obvious that these same vices continue to plague Liberia, as the President herself acknowledged in her inaugural address in 2006, declaring corruption as her administration’s worst adversary- “Public Enemy Number-1”, then these are dangerous signals for the peace and stability which are the sine qua non for the sustainable development of our beloved nation.

Leymah Gbowee’s criticism, like those of others, against the same vices that keep lurking their heads in our nation, should be taken as constructive, not destructive. Leymah should be seen as the Albert Porte (the prominent social reformer during the Tubman and Tolbert eras) of our days (a female like the President herself), making a clarion call to us Liberians to wake up and re-examine ourselves in order to save our nation. Let not sycophancy, as it did in the past be allowed to sweep these criticisms under the carpet. The mere fact that even the ruling Unity Party has been shaken to the core by the vibrations from these criticisms is a significant indicator that something is amiss. There is a saying that “No man is
infallible.” Even the Council of Churches, by their recent press statement, is getting concerned. It is better to err, accept, and correct it than to err and refuse to accept, and correct it. The President, Madam Ellen Johnson-Sirleaf, became head of Liberia in order to make a difference in the history of Liberia, and I believe that she still has time – five years in her favor to make that difference. Let’s learn from history and allow it to serve as our guide so that Liberia can make a triple jump in moving forward.

[01/22/13]   COMMENTARY
LOOKING AT THE LEYMAH GBOWEE STORY FROM ANOTHER ANGLE
By Dr. Joshua D.B. Giddings/0886552536

Leymah Gbowee, once a favorite among the grass-root women of Liberia, seems to have hit the rock with some women for her criticism of the Liberian President, Madam Ellen Johnson Sirleaf. She is now like a lonely voice among the women crying in the wilderness. She has been abandoned by groups who are now condemning her statement as “Unfortunate” against the Liberian President.

Leymah Gbowee, who, along with President Sirleaf, was among three women to win the 2012 Nobel Peace Prize, was quoted by journalists in Paris while there to launch her book, as saying, “People are very disappointed. We have a deficit when it comes to having a moral voice in the country.” According to the report, she accused President Sirleaf of not having the political will to fight corruption in the country, not being committed to reconciliation and engaging in “nepotism”(the placing of one’s close relatives and associates in high positions). For uttering these words, Leymah has been bombarded from left and right by critics who accuse her of lacking moral rectitude for saying the unthinkable about the Liberian President.

A women group, under the banner “Women of Liberia,” whose members came from the fifteen counties to welcome President Sirleaf at the Roberts International Airport from her trip to Tokyo, Japan, condemned Leymah, and told the President: “We say it was wrong for Madam Gbowee who enjoyed your confidence and had unhindered access to you, to attempt to cast a shadow, not only on you as a person, but on the great image you have tried to rebuild for a country that is striving toward development….” (The News, October 19, 2012).

With a little bit more reflection, maybe people should begin looking at Leymah’s criticism of the President in a different light. Responding to the same criticism from different quarters on the issue of nepotism, President Sirleaf was quoted in July as saying, “If I want a job done, and I know that a close relative of mine can get it done, I will put the relative there, because the results are more important to me than the noise in the market.” She also further emphasized that her sons, Robert Sirleaf, Senior Advisor to her and Chairman of the National Oil Company of Liberia (NOCAL) and Charles Sirleaf, Deputy Governor of the Central Bank of Liberia, are both well qualified for their respective positions (Daily Observer, July 17, 2012).

What makes such a statement from the President peculiar is the fact that, for those who can remember, it sounds strange coming from someone who was a very strong advocate against cronyism, corruption and nepotism during the Tolbert and Doe eras – a stance which many times led her into trouble. According to George Boley, in his book, titled, The Rise and fall of the First Republic, Madam Sirleaf, as Minister of Finance under President Tolbert, was extremely vocal on these issues, saying, “Nobody is above or should be above the laws of the land and that those laws are meant to be obeyed and adhered to” (1984, p. 92). This was in reference to top government officials, who were in the habit of evading tax payment to the government in those days.

At that time, Tolbert himself had admitted corruption in his government as he publicly declared, that “favoritism and nepotism are cancerous proclivities capable only of sapping the springs of national vitality and drying the ‘wells of peace and plenty.’” Yet Tolbert was accused of these same vices, because he had several relatives, most of whom may have also been well qualified, in high places in his government. In addition, he publicly admitted in 1978 that four million dollars was embezzled by some government officials although none were prosecuted then by government (Ibid., pp. 96-97).

Samuel Kanyon Doe came into the picture during the 1980 coup, executing officials of government for “rampant” corruption although Prince Johnson tells us in his book, titled, The Rise and Fall of President Kanyon Doe, that “Corruption, under Doe, tripled than that of the past administrations” (1991, p.18). According to him when Dr. H. Boima Fahnbulleh, Jr. criticized Doe and his regime for their “Get Rich Quick Attitude”, Doe said, “If Dr. Boima Fahnbulleh wants to be poor, let him be so. But he should not stop those who prefer to be rich” (Ibid.).

I thought it expedient to go back a little in history to bring up these points as we discuss the present issue of Leymah’s criticism of the President. No one can deny the tremendous stride that Liberia has made under the dynamic leadership of President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf in the last seven years. She has, indeed, brought the nation out of an abyss back into the comity of nations; however this should not stifle constructive criticisms. There are even those who wonder whether any other Liberian serving as President in her shoes now would do better than she. The answer to such a view could be yes, even though difficult. But any President, who would choose to do things differently from other past presidents, could be such a president. And that is a president who eschews those negative vices of the past, such as cronyism, corruption, nepotism, etc., which have kept Liberia, the oldest independent black African nation at the bottom of development in the world.

I am with the strongest conviction that God placed Madam Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, the first elected female president of Africa, at the helm of this nation at this point in time in our history for a special purpose – to make a difference; to lead us away from the same old ways which have kept Liberia underdeveloped for over a century. When it becomes obvious that these same vices continue to plague Liberia, as the President herself acknowledged in her inaugural address in 2006, declaring corruption as her administration’s worst adversary- “Public Enemy Number-1”, then these are dangerous signals for the peace and stability which are the sine qua non for the sustainable development of our beloved nation.

Leymah Gbowee’s criticism, like those of others, against the same vices that keep lurking their heads in our nation, should be taken as constructive, not destructive. Leymah should be seen as the Albert Porte (the prominent social reformer during the Tubman and Tolbert eras) of our days (a female like the President herself), making a clarion call to us Liberians to wake up and re-examine ourselves in order to save our nation. Let not sycophancy, as it did in the past be allowed to sweep these criticisms under the carpet. The mere fact that even the ruling Unity Party has been shaken to the core by the vibrations from these criticisms is a significant indicator that something is amiss. There is a saying that “No man is
infallible.” Even the Council of Churches, by their recent press statement, is getting concerned. It is better to err, accept, and correct it than to err and refuse to accept, and correct it. The President, Madam Ellen Johnson-Sirleaf, became head of Liberia in order to make a difference in the history of Liberia, and I believe that she still has time – five years in her favor to make that difference. Let’s learn from history and allow it to serve as our guide so that Liberia can make a triple jump in moving forward.

Location

Telephone

Address


Cuttington University
Suakoko
+231
Other Suakoko schools & colleges (show all)
PHEBE COMMUNITY LUTHERAN HIGH SCHOOL PHEBE COMMUNITY LUTHERAN HIGH SCHOOL
Gbarnga, B**g County
Suakoko, 0614, LR.BG.SU

The PCLHS is No.1 in providing quality education in post war Liberia... Demoi Emmanuel Jeogbor studied here.

National Youth Action, Inc. (NAYA) National Youth Action, Inc. (NAYA)
Phebe Air Strip, Suakoko District, P.O. Box 10-5527
Suakoko, 3000

National Youth Action, Inc. (NAYA)