Wednesbury County Technical School

Included in the building were four stained glass windows, one of which was given by J. H. Thursfield, the 3rd mayor of the borough. thrown in. Here goes. Mr.

County Secondary Technical School Wednesbury
The County Secondary Technical School Wednesbury was originally opened as Wednesbury Science School on August the 12th, 1896, occupying a position between the Post Office and the Town Hall. The interlinked initials WSS are above the front entrance and there are scientific instruments embossed in the brickwork, neither of which I ever noticed as a school

Operating as usual

10/01/2020

County Secondary Technical School Wednesbury
The County Secondary Technical School Wednesbury was originally opened as Wednesbury Science School on August the 12th, 1896, occupying a position between the Post Office and the Town Hall. The interlinked initials WSS are above the front entrance and there are scientific instruments embossed in the brickwork, neither of which I ever noticed as a schoolboy. Included in the building were four stained glass windows, one of which was given by J. H. Thursfield, the 3rd mayor of the borough. It represented a laboratory with the portraits of Lord Kelvin, Faraday, Davy, and Roger Bacon in medallions. Another window, given by Councillor J. Knowles, the 5th mayor, represented a blacksmith at work, with portraits of Stephenson, Bessemer, Watt and Siemens in medallions, corresponding with those in the other window. The two others in the lecture hall represented a working colliery and the Willingsworth iron furnaces.
I don’t know when the school changed its name but I still have the school sports trophy that Derek and I shared in that last year of the school. The first names on it are from 1947 but the school may have changed its title before that. When I went there it was a 13+-examination entry school for boys who had failed their 11+ exams to High/Grammar School. It gave a specialist technical education in Engineering, Technical Drawing, Metalwork, Woodwork, Electricity, Physics, Maths and English, with a bit of Geography, History and P.E. thrown in. We were fully prepared to enter local industries of the time, which seems a much better idea than the over biased academic qualification system we have nowadays. Well, it would be if any industries were left!
The school served the whole of South East Staffordshire, only a few of us were from Wednesbury. My class were the last pupils at the “Tech” when it ceased to be a school in 1960. Those of us who wanted to take our G.C.E.’s were given another years education by the Technical College staff and any younger pupils were transferred to the newly opened Darlaston Comprehensive. The building continued in use until 1996 as an adult education centre and had been unvisited since except by pigeons and vandals.
I went to a talk at Wednesbury Art Gallery on the Patent Shaft, which is where I used to work from 1961 until its close in 1980, It was organised by Wednesbury History Society and I asked if they knew how I could access my old school. Tony Mallan told me to ring John Allen MBE. He was very helpful and gave me the key holders telephone numbers at Sandwell Council. I spoke to Bob Large, who was happy to help and made arrangements for us to visit the school on 6th April. I contacted two classmates who I met again last year and emailed a couple more. They in turn passed it on to whomever they had an address for and in the end there were 10 of us, Mick Turner, Bill (John) Balance, Kaiser (David) Rowbotham, Mike Craddock, David Worley, Derek Everton, Ron Smith, Ian Poxon, Robert Rushton and myself. We met at 11.00am on Monday morning; most of us hadn’t seen each other for 49 years. My son Mark came along too, to act as photographer. Bob’s colleague, Brian Stone met us and let us in. We were warned it would be in a bad state and it certainly was. It was stripped bare, even the sinks in the toilets had been ripped out. There was no electricity and it was fairly dark on ground level as the only light was from the front door. The upstairs classrooms however, which were our old rooms, were OK though, and after inspection, Brian gathered us together and got us to update each other on our careers. Only a couple had not pursued industrial careers but they both had used the skills learned in their leisure time.
We moved up to the pub for a bite to eat, a couple of pints and a couple of hours reminiscing. We all agreed we had thoroughly enjoyed school. One of the factors was there were only 120 boys in the whole school and only 30 in a class, so everybody knew everybody. There were only 8 teachers including the headmaster, compare this to the comprehensives of today with 1500 pupils and 80 staff. There were two other sites we used, a metalwork/machine shop at Dorset Road, Darlaston and the gymnasium and canteen at the Technical College, Kendrick Street, Wednesbury. Somehow we would have to commute to these during our lunch hour and eat!
At Derek’s suggestion, I agreed to put our memories into print and see if The Black Country Bugle would be interested. Here goes.
On my first day at school, I had a fight with another pupil on the stairs, and was caned by the head – a fine start. Like many people, I think, “It never did me any harm,” and it helped to keep me in check! My favourite lessons were science with Mr Dennis Armstrong, maths with Mr. Gregory, the Head, and P.E. Our PE teacher John Pitts, was ex-army and introduced us to basketball, which was hardly ever played in this country then. He still had forces contacts and we had some great times at RAF Cosford, playing the cadets. He trained us well at all forms of sport and physical fitness and in 1960 we won every event in the senior Wednesbury inter-school sports competition. Some of us went on to represent South East Staffs in the County Sports at Stafford. Unfortunately the team bus broke down and the heats for my main event, 440 yards, had already taken place! One of Mr Pitt’s punishments was to make you run between two lines of the rest of the class, all armed with wooden rackets and with instructions to whack you. You were allowed to run through at top speed and sometimes got through unscathed.
Mr. Gregory left and the new head Mr. Perry took over. He seemed to be feared by the staff as much as the boys. I remember once during a science lesson Mr. Armstrong, “Louis” to us of course, got his finger stuck in a piece of tubing he had been fiddling with while teaching us. We all howled with laughter so much Mr. Perry stormed into the lab to see what was going on. We were silent at once and poor old Louis had to make some excuse while hiding his trapped finger behind his back. In our final year as students of the college we were amazed at yet another head, Mr. Whitmarsh, who used to give us work to do then put his feet up, smoke his pipe and read The Telegraph.
Jim (Tony) Skirving

Some of the memories of my classmates.

David Worley
I recall I sat the 13+ exam for the 'Tech' twice so when we started in 1958 I was 14, I remember the interview I had, it was held in the classroom directly above the main doorway. Mr Gregory the then headmaster and Mrs Naylor sat at a desk under the window, this was my first ever interview and I wasn't particularly confident. I must have been asked 'Why did I want to come to this school?' And in my reply I had talked about the school I was attending and the disruption to lessons caused by certain form members and the teachers problem with disciple (those classes where of 42-44 boys). I regretted saying these things almost as soon as they were out of my mouth, for I was being disloyal to my old school and teachers, to two other teachers I had only just meet. I was embarrassed, and even now thinking back on it, I still feel uncomfortable, silly isn't it?
Mrs Naylor (F***y as we boys called her though not to her face!) was to become our English and Geography teacher; she was an older lady with grey hair. She was a good teacher, firm and fair, with what seemed to be our best interests at heart as had Mr Gregory the head, he took us for maths. When he left he was replaced by Mr Perry (or the Big Bopper to us, for he was physically big and fat!) He never seemed to smile and he seemed unfriendly to the staff and us students alike.
I enjoyed my time at the 'Tech' although I never excelled at anything; I was middle of the road at most things except sport, definitely bottom of the class there. Mr Pitts the sports master would pick the basketball teams and our group would ask if we could go on a cross-country run. Off we would run enthusiastically until we were outside the main gates of the college in Walsall Rd, there the keenies would run down Hydes Rd, myself, big Ron and the rest would go for a walk around the town!

Derek Everton
It was great to get back to revisit Wednesbury Technical School where I spent my last two years of full time education and to meet some of the lads, who like myself at 13+, in 1958 had taken the opportunity to go for further education based on the more ‘technical’ theme, with the added bonus of knowing we were all of the same frame of mind, actually wanting to learn rather than school being just a chore which had to be done. With a knowledgeable crew of teachers all this made it a great two years to finish off schooling in preparation for the world outside where one had to earn a living!
One recollection of the Technical School days was of an Electrical Science lesson being given by Mr Benning; the lad sitting next to me was messing with some electric wiring, when all of a sudden there was a great white flash and a plume of smoke. He had short-circuited one of the 13 amp sockets on the workbench. Although he did survive being electrocuted and the sharp end of Mr Bennings tongue, he is sadly no longer with us today to enjoy these recollections. Mr. Bennings was a very knowledgeable teacher and I remember him well as he had been through the First World War, clearing the way in one operation, of b***y traps for the advancing allies. He was good at telling interesting stories of his experiences and it would not take much prompting to get him relating some of them, which sometimes didn't leave much time for the actual lesson, hence most of our yearly reports said, 'Could do better.'
All in all, ‘Wednesbury Technical School’ was a great school to have had the honour to attend.

Mike Turner
Most of my memories couldn’t be printed or we would all be branded as hooligans...It was a very happy school in crappy surroundings with extremely poor facilities but somehow managed to educate an assortment of strangers from different schools all over the West Midlands...One funny story that springs to mind was one afternoon a crowd of us ran across the road to catch the bus home...It was at the stop and about to move off...several of us managed to jump on the open platform but Bill was last and only managed to grab the handle at the back of the bus before it drove off...there was no room on the platform for him and the bus accelerated too quickly for him to let go so he ran very fast with giant steps to the next stop.

David Rowbotham
Memories that have stayed with me from my school days include the English lesson that was being given by an Irish lecturer from the main college. We were in our last year leading up to sitting our G.C.E.’s and he had a laid back way of teaching. He would walk up and down the aisle talking generally about exam techniques and what examiners were looking for etc, when out of the blue he told us that he had been a witness to the hanging of Lord Haw Haw after the war. The class went very quiet as he explained in graphic detail how it all went and that has lived with me ever since.

One summer Mr Pitts our PE teacher organised a summer camp that about half the class elected to attend, this was probably run by Staffordshire County Council. The campsite was in Wales near to Towyn and ran through the summer with more than one school present at any one time. One of the organised events was to climb Cader Iris, the second highest peak in Wales. Day one was a trek to the base camp at the bottom of the mountain. Old photographs show that next day we set off in shorts and short sleeved shirts, which seemed fine as it was a fine sunny day. We had been told to take our swimming trunks as there was a lake half way up that we could have a swim. When we did reach the lake it was icy cold and not one of us even went for a paddle. As we walked along a narrow ridge to reach the summit the mist came down, followed by wind and rain. I recall we sheltered for awhile in a ruined stone building that some sheep were also sheltering in. The guide from the camp who assisted Mr Pitts, seeing that we were wet through and cold decided that, to get us off the mountain quickly we should take a short cut down a slope covered in stones and shale. We soon became stretched out with boulders dislodged by those further up flying past those leading the way. It was about this stage when the slope became very steep and the guide admitted that we were lost, that two of our party started to cry. Eventually just continuing downhill in the mist we came to a small road and flagged someone down to ask where we where. Admittedly this was before the days of instant internet weather forecasts, GPS and mobile phones but I honestly don’t recall seeing either of our leaders use a map or compass.

Ron Smith
I think my funniest moment is still the first time Tony (Jim) and John (Bill) had their first mock scrap in the entrance hall (playground). I can remember most of the school forming around the walls and Tony and John going for each other hell for leather. The teachers then came out of their little "hut" in the entrance hall, thinking there was a riot, and then forming part of the circle and enjoying the "fight."
My memorable educational moment, was of Mrs Naylor taking us for English, she never had to raise her voice or threaten us with "Ted or the Bopper" to get us under control. She was a really good Teacher.
Bob Rushton
This is just a quick thought about Mr Banks, also known as, “Skuttsy” and his treasured to***co tin containing his best lathe cutting tools that he always kept in his jacket for security. (like David Worley’s wallet!) In a momentary lapse, whilst chasing some kid out of the workshop, he left the said tin on the workbench. I quickly nailed the tin to the bench, put the tools back in, lid on and elastic band slipped over and waited for his return. He did so, red and flustered and the relief on his face was a joy as he saw the tin, apparently unmolested, on the bench where he had left it – until he came to pick it up. The look on his face was an indescribable mix of reactions but surprise was certainly one of them.
Second thought – whilst messing around in the woodwork shop up at the Technical College I accidentally thrust a chisel into Brian Wood’s hand. On his way home, teacher “Rotty” Reynolds took Brian and me to Walsall hospital, where he had two stitches. ”Rotty” kept it quiet so he was a decent bloke after all. Brian’s mother never complained either but I wonder if she would have done if it happened in today’s compensation culture!County Secondary Technical School Wednesbury
The County Secondary Technical School Wednesbury was originally opened as Wednesbury Science School on August the 12th, 1896, occupying a position between the Post Office and the Town Hall. The interlinked initials WSS are above the front entrance and there are scientific instruments embossed in the brickwork, neither of which I ever noticed as a schoolboy. Included in the building were four stained glass windows, one of which was given by J. H. Thursfield, the 3rd mayor of the borough. It represented a laboratory with the portraits of Lord Kelvin, Faraday, Davy, and Roger Bacon in medallions. Another window, given by Councillor J. Knowles, the 5th mayor, represented a blacksmith at work, with portraits of Stephenson, Bessemer, Watt and Siemens in medallions, corresponding with those in the other window. The two others in the lecture hall represented a working colliery and the Willingsworth iron furnaces.
I don’t know when the school changed its name but I still have the school sports trophy that Derek and I shared in that last year of the school. The first names on it are from 1947 but the school may have changed its title before that. When I went there it was a 13+-examination entry school for boys who had failed their 11+ exams to High/Grammar School. It gave a specialist technical education in Engineering, Technical Drawing, Metalwork, Woodwork, Electricity, Physics, Maths and English, with a bit of Geography, History and P.E. thrown in. We were fully prepared to enter local industries of the time, which seems a much better idea than the over biased academic qualification system we have nowadays. Well, it would be if any industries were left!
The school served the whole of South East Staffordshire, only a few of us were from Wednesbury. My class were the last pupils at the “Tech” when it ceased to be a school in 1960. Those of us who wanted to take our G.C.E.’s were given another years education by the Technical College staff and any younger pupils were transferred to the newly opened Darlaston Comprehensive. The building continued in use until 1996 as an adult education centre and had been unvisited since except by pigeons and vandals.
I went to a talk at Wednesbury Art Gallery on the Patent Shaft, which is where I used to work from 1961 until its close in 1980, It was organised by Wednesbury History Society and I asked if they knew how I could access my old school. Tony Mallan told me to ring John Allen MBE. He was very helpful and gave me the key holders telephone numbers at Sandwell Council. I spoke to Bob Large, who was happy to help and made arrangements for us to visit the school on 6th April. I contacted two classmates who I met again last year and emailed a couple more. They in turn passed it on to whomever they had an address for and in the end there were 10 of us, Mick Turner, Bill (John) Balance, Kaiser (David) Rowbotham, Mike Craddock, David Worley, Derek Everton, Ron Smith, Ian Poxon, Robert Rushton and myself. We met at 11.00am on Monday morning; most of us hadn’t seen each other for 49 years. My son Mark came along too, to act as photographer. Bob’s colleague, Brian Stone met us and let us in. We were warned it would be in a bad state and it certainly was. It was stripped bare, even the sinks in the toilets had been ripped out. There was no electricity and it was fairly dark on ground level as the only light was from the front door. The upstairs classrooms however, which were our old rooms, were OK though, and after inspection, Brian gathered us together and got us to update each other on our careers. Only a couple had not pursued industrial careers but they both had used the skills learned in their leisure time.
We moved up to the pub for a bite to eat, a couple of pints and a couple of hours reminiscing. We all agreed we had thoroughly enjoyed school. One of the factors was there were only 120 boys in the whole school and only 30 in a class, so everybody knew everybody. There were only 8 teachers including the headmaster, compare this to the comprehensives of today with 1500 pupils and 80 staff. There were two other sites we used, a metalwork/machine shop at Dorset Road, Darlaston and the gymnasium and canteen at the Technical College, Kendrick Street, Wednesbury. Somehow we would have to commute to these during our lunch hour and eat!
At Derek’s suggestion, I agreed to put our memories into print and see if The Black Country Bugle would be interested. Here goes.

On my first day at school, I had a fight with another pupil on the stairs, and was caned by the head – a fine start. Like many people, I think, “It never did me any harm,” and it helped to keep me in check! My favourite lessons were science with Mr Dennis Armstrong, maths with Mr. Gregory, the Head, and P.E. Our PE teacher John Pitts, was ex-army and introduced us to basketball, which was hardly ever played in this country then. He still had forces contacts and we had some great times at RAF Cosford, playing the cadets. He trained us well at all forms of sport and physical fitness and in 1960 we won every event in the senior Wednesbury inter-school sports competition. Some of us went on to represent South East Staffs in the County Sports at Stafford. Unfortunately the team bus broke down and the heats for my main event, 440 yards, had already taken place! One of Mr Pitt’s punishments was to make you run between two lines of the rest of the class, all armed with wooden rackets and with instructions to whack you. You were allowed to run through at top speed and sometimes got through unscathed.
Mr. Gregory left and the new head Mr. Perry took over. He seemed to be feared by the staff as much as the boys. I remember once during a science lesson Mr. Armstrong, “Louis” to us of course, got his finger stuck in a piece of tubing he had been fiddling with while teaching us. We all howled with laughter so much Mr. Perry stormed into the lab to see what was going on. We were silent at once and poor old Louis had to make some excuse while hiding his trapped finger behind his back. In our final year as students of the college we were amazed at yet another head, Mr. Whitmarsh took over, he gave us work to do then put his feet up, smoke his pipe and read The Telegraph.
Jim (Tony) Skirving

Some of the memories of my classmates.

David Worley
I recall I sat the 13+ exam for the 'Tech' twice so when we started in 1958 I was 14, I remember the interview I had, it was held in the classroom directly above the main doorway. Mr Gregory the then headmaster and Mrs Naylor sat at a desk under the window, this was my first ever interview and I wasn't particularly confident. I must have been asked 'Why did I want to come to this school?' And in my reply I had talked about the school I was attending and the disruption to lessons caused by certain form members and the teachers problem with disciple (those classes where of 42-44 boys). I regretted saying these things almost as soon as they were out of my mouth, for I was being disloyal to my old school and teachers, to two other teachers I had only just meet. I was embarrassed, and even now thinking back on it, I still feel uncomfortable, silly isn't it?
Mrs Naylor (F***y as we boys called her though not to her face!) was to become our English and Geography teacher; she was an older lady with grey hair. She was a good teacher, firm and fair, with what seemed to be our best interests at heart as had Mr Gregory the head, he took us for maths. When he left he was replaced by Mr Perry (or the Big Bopper to us, for he was physically big and fat!) He never seemed to smile and he seemed unfriendly to the staff and us students alike.
I enjoyed my time at the 'Tech' although I never excelled at anything; I was middle of the road at most things except sport, definitely bottom of the class there. Mr Pitts the sports master would pick the basketball teams and our group would ask if we could go on a cross-country run. Off we would run enthusiastically until we were outside the main gates of the college in Walsall Rd, there the keenies would run down Hydes Rd, myself, big Ron and the rest would go for a walk around the town!

Derek Everton
It was great to get back to revisit Wednesbury Technical School where I spent my last two years of full time education and to meet some of the lads, who like myself at 13+, in 1958 had taken the opportunity to go for further education based on the more ‘technical’ theme, with the added bonus of knowing we were all of the same frame of mind, actually wanting to learn rather than school being just a chore which had to be done. With a knowledgeable crew of teachers all this made it a great two years to finish off schooling in preparation for the world outside where one had to earn a living!
One recollection of the Technical School days was of an Electrical Science lesson being given by Mr Benning; the lad sitting next to me was messing with some electric wiring, when all of a sudden there was a great white flash and a plume of smoke. He had short-circuited one of the 13 amp sockets on the workbench. Although he did survive being electrocuted and the sharp end of Mr Bennings tongue, he is sadly no longer with us today to enjoy these recollections. Mr. Bennings was a very knowledgeable teacher and I remember him well as he had been through the First World War, clearing the way in one operation, of b***y traps for the advancing allies. He was good at telling interesting stories of his experiences and it would not take much prompting to get him relating some of them, which sometimes didn't leave much time for the actual lesson, hence most of our yearly reports said, 'Could do better.'
All in all, ‘Wednesbury Technical School’ was a great school to have had the honour to attend.

Mike Turner
Most of my memories couldn’t be printed or we would all be branded as hooligans...It was a very happy school in crappy surroundings with extremely poor facilities but somehow managed to educate an assortment of strangers from different schools all over the West Midlands...One funny story that springs to mind was one afternoon a crowd of us ran across the road to catch the bus home...It was at the stop and about to move off...several of us managed to jump on the open platform but Bill was last and only managed to grab the handle at the back of the bus before it drove off...there was no room on the platform for him and the bus accelerated too quickly for him to let go so he ran very fast with giant steps to the next stop.

David Rowbotham
Memories that have stayed with me from my school days include the English lesson that was being given by an Irish lecturer from the main college. We were in our last year leading up to sitting our G.C.E.’s and he had a laid back way of teaching. He would walk up and down the aisle talking generally about exam techniques and what examiners were looking for etc, when out of the blue he told us that he had been a witness to the hanging of Lord Haw Haw after the war. The class went very quiet as he explained in graphic detail how it all went and that has lived with me ever since.

One summer Mr Pitts our PE teacher organised a summer camp that about half the class elected to attend, this was probably run by Staffordshire County Council. The campsite was in Wales near to Towyn and ran through the summer with more than one school present at any one time. One of the organised events was to climb Cader Iris, the second highest peak in Wales. Day one was a trek to the base camp at the bottom of the mountain. Old photographs show that next day we set off in shorts and short sleeved shirts, which seemed fine as it was a fine sunny day. We had been told to take our swimming trunks as there was a lake half way up that we could have a swim. When we did reach the lake it was icy cold and not one of us even went for a paddle. As we walked along a narrow ridge to reach the summit the mist came down, followed by wind and rain. I recall we sheltered for awhile in a ruined stone building that some sheep were also sheltering in. The guide from the camp who assisted Mr Pitts, seeing that we were wet through and cold decided that, to get us off the mountain quickly we should take a short cut down a slope covered in stones and shale. We soon became stretched out with boulders dislodged by those further up flying past those leading the way. It was about this stage when the slope became very steep and the guide admitted that we were lost, that two of our party started to cry. Eventually just continuing downhill in the mist we came to a small road and flagged someone down to ask where we where. Admittedly this was before the days of instant internet weather forecasts, GPS and mobile phones but I honestly don’t recall seeing either of our leaders use a map or compass.

Ron Smith
I think my funniest moment is still the first time Tony (Jim) and John (Bill) had their first mock scrap in the entrance hall (playground). I can remember most of the school forming around the walls and Tony and John going for each other hell for leather. The teachers then came out of their little "hut" in the entrance hall, thinking there was a riot, and then forming part of the circle and enjoying the "fight."
My memorable educational moment, was of Mrs Naylor taking us for English, she never had to raise her voice or threaten us with "Ted or the Bopper" to get us under control. She was a really good Teacher.

Bob Rushton
This is just a quick thought about Mr Banks, also known as, “Skuttsy” and his treasured to***co tin containing his best lathe cutting tools that he always kept in his jacket for security. (like David Worley’s wallet!) In a momentary lapse, whilst chasing some kid out of the workshop, he left the said tin on the workbench. I quickly nailed the tin to the bench, put the tools back in, lid on and elastic band slipped over and waited for his return. He did so, red and flustered and the relief on his face was a joy as he saw the tin, apparently unmolested, on the bench where he had left it – until he came to pick it up. The look on his face was an indescribable mix of reactions but surprise was certainly one of them.
Second thought – whilst messing around in the woodwork shop up at the Technical College I accidentally thrust a chisel into Brian Wood’s hand. On his way home, teacher “Rotty” Reynolds took Brian and me to Walsall hospital, where he had two stitches. ”Rotty” kept it quiet so he was a decent bloke after all. Brian’s mother never complained either but I wonder if she would have done if it happened in today’s compensation culture

06/01/2016

An abridged article of the above was printed in the Black Country Bugle. Anyone else got any photos or memories to share?

24/04/2012

Untitled Album

Pupils 19/02/2012

Pupils

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Holyhead Road
Wednesbury
WS10 7

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