Little White Cottage

Little White Cottage

Comments

I appear to have crocheted an unfeasibily long, weirdly furry umbilical cord 😲😆.... however it is turning into a rather snuggly rug, "adventures in crochet" all started by the fab Little White Cottage
I appear to have crocheted an unfeasibly long, weirdly furry umbilical cord 😲😆 however it is turning into a rather nice rug... Adventures in crochet.... all thanks to Little White Cottage
sadly I am not going to make ripping yarns this sun :-( :-( Phil is still away, (we have no heating or hot water, so he would not manage at home) and it is a bit too late and a bit too far to leave J..... will think of you all. PS I have crocheted a case for my phone, a first project after the crochet session, will post a piccie x
I miss your classes and the chats... :( ###

Learn to sew with Little White Cottage. Classes held at various venues in the glorious Cotswolds.

Operating as usual

30/08/2021

Hello Liberty’s 🙂

If you enjoy free machine embroidery or drawing with thread (by lowering the feed dogs in your machine) this could be for you.

Using the thread to draw the outline of the image and then filling in with watercolour. I’m sure it could be achieved the other way around too.

Simple and beautiful and just a little bit different.

Hello Liberty’s 🙂

If you enjoy free machine embroidery or drawing with thread (by lowering the feed dogs in your machine) this could be for you.

Using the thread to draw the outline of the image and then filling in with watercolour. I’m sure it could be achieved the other way around too.

Simple and beautiful and just a little bit different.

Timeline Photos 30/07/2021

Oh my gosh -perfect role alert!!

I would LOVE this position as it would combine my early years experience plus my sewing teaching into one glorious and fabulous job.

I have new job in a private school starting in September though. Good luck to whoever gets this role though as it will be fantastic.

📣 New vacancy 📣

We're looking to appoint a Sewing Lecturer to join our busy and thriving Learning
and Teaching department to teach on the Norland diploma.

Are you interested in this role or know someone who would be? Visit our website for more information and find out how to apply: https://bit.ly/3iREc8e

Photos from Little White Cottage's post 29/07/2021

These pyjamas saw action with all 3 boys. By the time they’d got to T the knees were thin and the threads were failing so after a while T went through the knee.

I cut the legs off and made them into shorts. It’s so easy to do and extends the life of the pyjama bottoms for just a bit longer. The leftover fabrics I put in my stash to use in smaller projects.

25/07/2021

Edward I was a natty decorator or at least his decorator was a natty decorator. I love this recreation of his bedchamber at The Tower of London that we saw today.

Based on contemporary accounts of what was there this painted wall design is something that I really liked. I’d love to do something like this in our bedroom.

I might even have a go creating the design on a bit of fabric.

Edward I was a natty decorator or at least his decorator was a natty decorator. I love this recreation of his bedchamber at The Tower of London that we saw today.

Based on contemporary accounts of what was there this painted wall design is something that I really liked. I’d love to do something like this in our bedroom.

I might even have a go creating the design on a bit of fabric.

25/07/2021

Now this looks cool....

I’m not into denim as a fabric for anything other than jeans. I don’t reuse our worn out jeans fabrics having only made 1 pair of Hubbie’s old jeans into a pair of dungarees for F when she was little.

We don’t need any purses or bags , I don’t wear denim skirts, F hates jeans (she doesn’t even own 1 pair if jeans) and I don’t need denim for patches.

But these poufs might have just turned my head to the world of denim.

The different colours really add to the design and it’s a feature of the work.

I might have to add the boys jeans to my old clothes drawer in the utility room to start a collection.

Treat your feet to a charming footrest made from old jeans or other sturdy fabric. See more examples and get the pattern here: http://quiltingdigest.com/treat-your-feet-to-an-upcycled-fabric-footstool/

23/07/2021

I was a bridesmaid many years ago and I got to wear a beautiful cotton dress. I kept it for years thinking I couldn’t do anything with it out of respect: it was expensive; I didn’t buy it; I should leave it as it is.

Having seen it hung in my wardrobe for years, one day I saw how ridiculous this was because if I hadn’t worn it in 5 years, really, it was very unlikely that I wouldn’t wear it in the next 5 years.

What a waste.

I made my own template for a summer top by drawing out half of the front on a folded piece of paper. Once I’d cut round the shape and unfolded the paper I had a symmetrical shape that I could use as a template. I did the same for the back piece.

I cut a back and front piece from the green fabric and then the same from the lining of the dress so I could use that to line my top.

I sewed the pieces right sides together all the way round but left a small section on the side seam so I could turn it right sides out which meant that all the seams were on the inside. I ladder stitched the gap and you’d never know it was there. This made the inside neat but also reversible.

For the straps, I made long lengths of fabric and crossed them over at the back. This not only added a bit of interest to the overall design but had a functional use as it helped fit the top to the body.

I wish I’d done this years ago.

It was relatively easy and showed me I could really make my own summer tops.

I was a bridesmaid many years ago and I got to wear a beautiful cotton dress. I kept it for years thinking I couldn’t do anything with it out of respect: it was expensive; I didn’t buy it; I should leave it as it is.

Having seen it hung in my wardrobe for years, one day I saw how ridiculous this was because if I hadn’t worn it in 5 years, really, it was very unlikely that I wouldn’t wear it in the next 5 years.

What a waste.

I made my own template for a summer top by drawing out half of the front on a folded piece of paper. Once I’d cut round the shape and unfolded the paper I had a symmetrical shape that I could use as a template. I did the same for the back piece.

I cut a back and front piece from the green fabric and then the same from the lining of the dress so I could use that to line my top.

I sewed the pieces right sides together all the way round but left a small section on the side seam so I could turn it right sides out which meant that all the seams were on the inside. I ladder stitched the gap and you’d never know it was there. This made the inside neat but also reversible.

For the straps, I made long lengths of fabric and crossed them over at the back. This not only added a bit of interest to the overall design but had a functional use as it helped fit the top to the body.

I wish I’d done this years ago.

It was relatively easy and showed me I could really make my own summer tops.

22/07/2021

I have always loved the work of William Morris. I've been lucky enough to visit Kelmscott Manor with a friend as a birthday treat a couple of years ago and loved walking through the rooms and imagining living there myself.

His fabric and wallpaper designs can be quite 'busy', quite bright and overpowering which are, generally, three things I don't like when it comes to design. We don't have heavy prints in our home and are colours are quite muted so it's interesting that there's something about William Morris that I like.

It could be the colour combinations, the subjects chosen (nature features heavily as was typical of the arts and crafts movement to which William Morris was a founding member) or the historical feel that the house and the fabrics have; the ability to feel and touch the past if you just turned your head quickly enough.

I'm not sure but The Strawberry Thief (pictured) is a particular favourite of mine. I can imagine me making up a cushion (of course with piping ;) ) using half a metre or buying a tapestry kit and quietly using the winter months to sew my way through the pattern with the long wool threads.

Winter was made for such things.

Do you have a favourite designer? What is it about their work they like?

Emma x
.
.
.
Photo credit: By The original uploader was VAwebteam at English Wikipedia. - Transferred from en.wikipedia to Commons by NotFromUtrecht using CommonsHelper., CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=8929907

I have always loved the work of William Morris. I've been lucky enough to visit Kelmscott Manor with a friend as a birthday treat a couple of years ago and loved walking through the rooms and imagining living there myself.

His fabric and wallpaper designs can be quite 'busy', quite bright and overpowering which are, generally, three things I don't like when it comes to design. We don't have heavy prints in our home and are colours are quite muted so it's interesting that there's something about William Morris that I like.

It could be the colour combinations, the subjects chosen (nature features heavily as was typical of the arts and crafts movement to which William Morris was a founding member) or the historical feel that the house and the fabrics have; the ability to feel and touch the past if you just turned your head quickly enough.

I'm not sure but The Strawberry Thief (pictured) is a particular favourite of mine. I can imagine me making up a cushion (of course with piping ;) ) using half a metre or buying a tapestry kit and quietly using the winter months to sew my way through the pattern with the long wool threads.

Winter was made for such things.

Do you have a favourite designer? What is it about their work they like?

Emma x
.
.
.
Photo credit: By The original uploader was VAwebteam at English Wikipedia. - Transferred from en.wikipedia to Commons by NotFromUtrecht using CommonsHelper., CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=8929907

22/07/2021

Goodness me it seems such a long time since I hosted children's sewing parties...

It seems so long since I hosted children's holiday sewing classes...

These are in the plan and will happen again but when things have calmed down bit.

I've got felt Christmas tree decorations going round my head at the moment so I think there will be a couple of sessions in the Christmas holidays, all being well (as my lovely friend Liz likes to say).

Once I've found a gorgeous venue I'll let you know dates and prices. These will be for both children and adults because who doesn't love a relaxing 2 hours hand sewing something beautiful while chatting to new friends?

Emma x

Goodness me it seems such a long time since I hosted children's sewing parties...

It seems so long since I hosted children's holiday sewing classes...

These are in the plan and will happen again but when things have calmed down bit.

I've got felt Christmas tree decorations going round my head at the moment so I think there will be a couple of sessions in the Christmas holidays, all being well (as my lovely friend Liz likes to say).

Once I've found a gorgeous venue I'll let you know dates and prices. These will be for both children and adults because who doesn't love a relaxing 2 hours hand sewing something beautiful while chatting to new friends?

Emma x

22/07/2021

I’m not one who spends time worrying about how I look or whether I’m wearing the ‘right’ fashionable clothes preferring to buy what I like from where I like and not worrying about labels.

I’ve always loved charity shops and have bought not just clothes but furniture (F’s room is filled with entirely second hand wooden furniture) and books and plates and anything else that we need or could make use of.

I have had issues with dresses lately though and the way they fit me and make me feel. My changing body shape (I’m 45 and peri menopausal) means that there are more jiggly bits then there ever were and dresses seem to highlight and accentuate this. I need to find a new shape and style that works for me and that’s proving a little difficult.

While in Liberty’s yesterday I saw this beautiful dress. Yes, I was attracted by the fabric (aren’t I always?) but the shape and the way it was simple (the fabric did the talking really) and hung beautifully I knew this would be a dress for me to try.

I bought the pattern (Merchant and Mills ‘Trapeze Dress’) and I’m going to make it. It’s not tight, has short and long sleeve options and can be made out of so many different fabrics to give different looks.

I’ll keep you posted as to how I get on.

Emma x

I’m not one who spends time worrying about how I look or whether I’m wearing the ‘right’ fashionable clothes preferring to buy what I like from where I like and not worrying about labels.

I’ve always loved charity shops and have bought not just clothes but furniture (F’s room is filled with entirely second hand wooden furniture) and books and plates and anything else that we need or could make use of.

I have had issues with dresses lately though and the way they fit me and make me feel. My changing body shape (I’m 45 and peri menopausal) means that there are more jiggly bits then there ever were and dresses seem to highlight and accentuate this. I need to find a new shape and style that works for me and that’s proving a little difficult.

While in Liberty’s yesterday I saw this beautiful dress. Yes, I was attracted by the fabric (aren’t I always?) but the shape and the way it was simple (the fabric did the talking really) and hung beautifully I knew this would be a dress for me to try.

I bought the pattern (Merchant and Mills ‘Trapeze Dress’) and I’m going to make it. It’s not tight, has short and long sleeve options and can be made out of so many different fabrics to give different looks.

I’ll keep you posted as to how I get on.

Emma x

21/07/2021

It was the gorgeous Liberty :)

My next question is: did I buy fabric or something else?

It was the gorgeous Liberty :)

My next question is: did I buy fabric or something else?

21/07/2021

Where am I?

(I really am here!)

Where am I?

(I really am here!)

19/07/2021

It’s hot, hot, hot out there!

A couple of years ago I made F a reversible hat. It’s not something I’d sewn before and I was surprised how easy it was.

Accurate cutting, sewing on the machine and a little hand sewing to finish off.

I think I’ll make another one as this one is now much too small.

If you'd like to make one of your own, click on the link to buy the pattern from Oliver + S :
https://oliverands.com/shop/oliver-s-reversible-bucket-hat-sewing-pattern.html

It’s hot, hot, hot out there!

A couple of years ago I made F a reversible hat. It’s not something I’d sewn before and I was surprised how easy it was.

Accurate cutting, sewing on the machine and a little hand sewing to finish off.

I think I’ll make another one as this one is now much too small.

If you'd like to make one of your own, click on the link to buy the pattern from Oliver + S :
https://oliverands.com/shop/oliver-s-reversible-bucket-hat-sewing-pattern.html

17/07/2021

Another piped cushion using leftover material from my stash made with my new piping foot.

I bloody love a piping foot!!

SO much easier to make the piping (no pinning needed) and so much easier to sew into the cushion.

It’s interesting as I’m not ‘foot’ averse but I am someone who will make do which had always been fine in the past but actually, I’ve quite a few cushions to make up so really the proper foot makes the job so much easier.

Another piped cushion using leftover material from my stash made with my new piping foot.

I bloody love a piping foot!!

SO much easier to make the piping (no pinning needed) and so much easier to sew into the cushion.

It’s interesting as I’m not ‘foot’ averse but I am someone who will make do which had always been fine in the past but actually, I’ve quite a few cushions to make up so really the proper foot makes the job so much easier.

16/07/2021

Filling in some paperwork this morning.

This made giggle.

😂

Filling in some paperwork this morning.

This made giggle.

😂

15/07/2021

Still working hard on free machine embroidered letters. Luckily the awful ‘k’ in ‘make’ is hidden by the machine foot 😂

What sewing skill do you find hard?

What’s your sewing Everest?

Still working hard on free machine embroidered letters. Luckily the awful ‘k’ in ‘make’ is hidden by the machine foot 😂

What sewing skill do you find hard?

What’s your sewing Everest?

14/07/2021

Some lovely linen I’ve washed before I start making it into either a top or trousers. It’s stiffer than I thought it would be - that’s what you get from buying online I suppose - so it might better to be made into trousers.

It’s a deep maroon colour that will be lovely for the autumn.

Some lovely linen I’ve washed before I start making it into either a top or trousers. It’s stiffer than I thought it would be - that’s what you get from buying online I suppose - so it might better to be made into trousers.

It’s a deep maroon colour that will be lovely for the autumn.

14/07/2021

Over the years I've taught my sewing classes there are a few generalised things I've noticed that happen. Yes, my pupils are mostly women (men are more than welcome but I just don't seem to attract many male students) and yes, we make wonderful projects that pupils thought they never could but there's something more than that that's happened again with my latest set of students.

They make friends.

They connect to someone sitting next to or near to them in a way they probably don't ordinarily. The side by side nature of the classes means even the most shyest of student might find the confidence to talk to those who are near them. No one looks right at them or needs total eye contact because everyone's busy looking at what's happening with the fabric on their machines.

I've noticed that many of my students over the years come to my classes not just for the sewing but the connection with a regular group. It's like therapy for those who, perhaps, didn't need it but found they loved it when the 'therapy' fitted what their brains were looking for. We talk about our lives, our children, our not having children, our work, our health all while making something that didn't exist previous to the class.

'I'm chuffed with that!'

'I'm proud of that!'

'I'll give that another go!'

All said during a class or soon after the class has finished. Some students tell me quietly they have achieved something they thought they never could, some email me pictures of fabulous projects they made at home with their new enthusiams and confidence and some, because there are always these fabulous ladies, extol the virtues of what they are doing loudly and prouldly in class.

It takes all sorts to make a sewing class feel welcoming and comfortable and I hope my classes are just that.

If you're wanting to join something new really do take the plunge and give it a go. (You can see a nearly 3 year old T in the photo giving sewing a go.) Whether it's pottery, floristry, jewellery making or just finding a middle aged woman with slighty frizzy hair who loves spending 3 nights a week with wonderful students teaching them to sew. Book yourself on and give it a go.

Emma x

**My Autumn classes are fully booked but here's the link so you can keep an eye out if any places become available**
https://www.cirencester.ac.uk/w/store/adult_course/making-friends-with-your-sewing-machine-4/

Over the years I've taught my sewing classes there are a few generalised things I've noticed that happen. Yes, my pupils are mostly women (men are more than welcome but I just don't seem to attract many male students) and yes, we make wonderful projects that pupils thought they never could but there's something more than that that's happened again with my latest set of students.

They make friends.

They connect to someone sitting next to or near to them in a way they probably don't ordinarily. The side by side nature of the classes means even the most shyest of student might find the confidence to talk to those who are near them. No one looks right at them or needs total eye contact because everyone's busy looking at what's happening with the fabric on their machines.

I've noticed that many of my students over the years come to my classes not just for the sewing but the connection with a regular group. It's like therapy for those who, perhaps, didn't need it but found they loved it when the 'therapy' fitted what their brains were looking for. We talk about our lives, our children, our not having children, our work, our health all while making something that didn't exist previous to the class.

'I'm chuffed with that!'

'I'm proud of that!'

'I'll give that another go!'

All said during a class or soon after the class has finished. Some students tell me quietly they have achieved something they thought they never could, some email me pictures of fabulous projects they made at home with their new enthusiams and confidence and some, because there are always these fabulous ladies, extol the virtues of what they are doing loudly and prouldly in class.

It takes all sorts to make a sewing class feel welcoming and comfortable and I hope my classes are just that.

If you're wanting to join something new really do take the plunge and give it a go. (You can see a nearly 3 year old T in the photo giving sewing a go.) Whether it's pottery, floristry, jewellery making or just finding a middle aged woman with slighty frizzy hair who loves spending 3 nights a week with wonderful students teaching them to sew. Book yourself on and give it a go.

Emma x

**My Autumn classes are fully booked but here's the link so you can keep an eye out if any places become available**
https://www.cirencester.ac.uk/w/store/adult_course/making-friends-with-your-sewing-machine-4/

Videos (show all)

How to make a 6cm heart template
Here's the video showing how to make the first part of the flower that I crocheted the other day. I've just put F to bed...
Here's the video tutorial showing you how to make the cord we learned how to make in the Viking workshop the boys went t...
This is video number 2 as video number 1 ended embarrassingly with Ni**od getting caught up with a lovely chocolate Labr...
518 bags you lovely lot made.FIVE HUNDRED AND EIGHTEEN BAGS!!!To say I'm proud is an understatement.To say I was quite e...
Excuse the blocked nose and coughing but here's a quick Vlog letting you know how I decided which fabric to use for my d...
Here's a very sweet video of Little Miss F teaching 'Baby' how to jump.I love how she adores Baby :)

Location

Category

Address


Eastfield
Ashton Keynes
SN66PR
Other Education in Ashton Keynes (show all)
Tiny Tulips Childminding Tiny Tulips Childminding
Harris Road
Ashton Keynes, SN66PQ

OFSTED registered childminder, based in the village of Ashton Keynes. Graded GOOD in all areas September 2019.